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Full text of "Home Missionary, The (May 1888-April 1889)"

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THE 



Home Missionary. 



MAY, 1888, 




CONTENTS. f 



TREASURY NOTE 1 

THE SARATOGA MEETING 1 

FIVE GREAT DANGERS 3 

HOME MISSIONS RULED THE 

HOUR 4 

ATTEMPT— EXPECT 5 

"YOU KNOW HIM" 7 

ACCEPTABLE POCKETS 8 

NEW RACES COMING 9 

A CONVERTED LUMBERMAN.. 10 

FACING DEATH 11 

SPECIAL PROVIDENCES IN 

HOME MISSIONS 13 

A CONTINUAL PICNIC PARISH 14 

MISSIONARY CABBAGES 16 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN VIEWS .... 16 

ONLY A STEP 19 

THE CHRISTIAN EMPIRE 19 

WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 21 

Florida 22 



How California came into line 23 

Minnesota 23 

To the Point 24 

The Perseverance of one Saint 24 

A Precious Service 24 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 25 

Banner State this Month 25 

Home Missionary News 26 

What they have been Doing. . 27 

Questions and Answers 27 

Aunt Nabby's Proposition 29 

The Missionary Barrel 30 

For the Little Ones 30 

AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDU- 
CATION SOCIETY 31 

APPOINTMENTS 32 

RECEIPTS 32 

WOMAN'S STATE HOME MIS- 
SIONARY ORGANIZATIONS.. 44 
MISSIONARY BOXES 44 



Vol. LXI. No. 1. 



NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Bible House, Astor Place. 



SIXTY CENTS A TEAS, I IT ADVANCE, P0STA6E PAH). 



ENTERED AT THE POST OFFICE AT NEW YORK, N. V., AS SECOND CLASS [KAIL] MATTER. 



THE 

HOME MISSIONAEY. 

Go Preach the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

now shall they preach except they be sent? Rom. x. 15. 

VOL. LXI. MAY, 1888. No. 1. 

TREASURY NOTE. 

The close of the Society's sixty-second year brought special occasion 
for thanksgiving to God. He so moved upon the hearts of his children 
that the thirty-first of March found every note at the banks paid, and 
not a dollar due to any missionary who had i*eported labor. 

The debt at one time within the year had reached more than $75,000. 
Besides paying this large sum, the contributions and legacies enable us 
to replace not less than $30,000 of the $50,000 borrowed from the Swett 
Exigency Fund, on which the Society depends for paying its mission- 
aries during the usual summer drought. 

If, therefore, the friends of Home Missions will so provide that from 
this time until the Annual Meeting, June 5, the current expenses are 
met, leaving this part of the Swett Fund intact for use during the rest 
of the hot months, the summer's work will go vigorously on, and every 
laborer can be promptly paid, until the abundant autumn receipts fill 
the treasury once more. For a consummation so greatly to be desired 
both by givers and receivers, we devoutly pray. 



THE SARATOGA MEETING. 

The Sixty-second Annual Meeting of the American Home Missionary 
Society will be held in the Methodist Church, Saratoga Springs, N. Y., 
commencing on Tuesday evening, June 5th, 1888, with the annual ser- 
mon by the Rev. George Leon Walker, D.D., of Hartford, Conn. 
The meetings will close on Thursday evening, June 7th. The President 
of the Society, Rev. Julius H. Seelye, D.D. of Amherst College, is ex- 
pected to preside and deliver an address on Wednesday morning. The 
officers of the Society are making special efforts to secure a large attend- 
ance of representative laymen from all parts of the country, and the 
meeting on Wednesday evening will be addressed by well known persons 
of this class. 



2 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

The women will hold their meeting on Wednesday afternoon. 

Mrs. J. A. Biddle, of Hartford, Connecticut, will preside. A 
special effort has been made to secure speakers from the field. Mrs. J. 
W. Pickett, of Colorado, will give some Rocky Mountain experiences. 
Mr. Adams will speak of his work in Chicago. The work of the foreign 
departments will be presented by native speakers. Mrs. S. E. Eastman 
will give a familiar talk to young ladies, and Rev. W. G. Puddefoot will 
gather up the crumbs. At this meeting, Ohio will be represented by 
Mrs. J. G. W. Cowles ; Missouri, by Mrs. C. L. Goodell ; Florida, by 
Mrs. S. F. Gale ; and Washington Territory, by Mrs. N. F. Cobleigh. 
There are indications of an unusually large attendance of delegates from 
the Woman's State Unions. 

Representatives from the field will speak at the different sessions 
throughout Thursday. 

The prospects are that there will be a larger attendance than ever at 
the approaching auniversary. Those that go once are sure to go again 
and take their friends with them. But there is no danger of overcrowd- 
ing Saratoga. Ample accommodations will be provided for all, and all 
will be made welcome. 

Arrangements for reduced fares by North River boats, and railroads, 
will be published in the religious papers. 

The Rev. T. W. Jones, chairman of the local committee, has secured 
large reductions in rates of board during the meetings, as will be seen in 
the following list. 

In communicating with these houses the applicant will do well to 
name price at which board is desired, and ask for reply by return mail. 

HOUSES AT $1 PER DAY. 

Franklin House, Church St. ; Regent St. House, (Barrett) 209 Re- 
gent St.; Mrs. M. A. Gumey, 54 Phila St.; Mrs. Wright, 1 Ellsworth 
Block, Henry St.; J. H. Mabie, 23 Franklin St.; Wm. H. Waring, 25 
Franklin St. ; Garden View, Broadway ; West House, 48 Franklin St. ; 
H. Del Corral, 125 Phila St.; Mrs. L. Hayden, 101 Grand Ave.; Miss 
D. A. Pierce, 364| Broadway ; P. Markell, 5 Friedlander Row, Wash- 
ington St.; Mrs. E.Schmidt, 66 Caroline St.; Mrs. A. Reynolds, 2 
Friedlander Row, Washington St. 

HOUSES AT $1 TWO IN A ROOM, $1.25 ONE IN A ROOM. 

Continental Hotel, Washington St.; Broadway House, 522 Broad- 
way; Circular St. House, Circular St.; Vanderburg Cottage, 131 Phila 
St.; Mrs. Dr. Carpenter, 186 Regent St.; Columbian Place, Broadway; 
Mrs. H. M. Gilbert. 59 Henry St.; Tefft House, 33 Franklin St.; Preston 
House, 72 AVashington St. 

HOUSES AT $1 TWO IN A ROOM, $1.50 ONE IN A ROOM. 

Dr. Hamilton, Franklin St. ; Spencer House, Woodlawn Ave. and 
Division St.; F. E. Swan, 30 Woodlawn Ave.; Vermont House, $1.25. 



THE 



Home Missionary: 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



APRIL, 1889. 



"Go, . . Preach the Gospel." — Ma/rkxvi. 15. 

" How shall they Preach, except they be sent?" — Rom. x. 15. 



Vol. LXI. 



NEW YORK: 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

BIBLE HOUSE, ASTOR PLACE. 
18S9. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 3 

HOUSES AT $1.25 TO $1.50. 

Washburne House, Washington St.; Dr. 0. J. Traver, 103 Circular 
St.; F. E. Ravvson, Gl Spring St.. $1.25 to $2; Summer Rest, 75 
Spring St. ; Miss March, No. 1 Batchelor Block, Regent St. 

HOUSES AT $1.50 PER DAY. 

Trim Cottage, 01 Phila St.; Mrs. J. P. Scoville, 57 Phila St.; Albion 
House, 72 Front St.; Everett House, South Broadway; J. C. Fitzgerald, 
136 Circular St. 

HOUSES AT $1.50 TO $2 PER DAY. 

Congress Park House, Broadway ; Balch House, 526 North Broad- 
way. 

HOUSES AT $2 PER DAY. 

Worden House ; Dr. Strong's ; the American Hotel will probably be 
open as usual. 



FIVE GREAT DANGERS. 

At the last General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church a committee 
of thirteen elders was appointed to arouse the churches to the necessity 
of increased effort in behalf of mission work at home. The committee 
has just issued a circular in which the five following " items of undenia- 
ble facts" are presented as food for thought and incentive to action : 

1. First, to the immense, unceasing, and ever enlarging influx of 
foreigners — more than a thousand souls a day — mostly ignorant and 
irreligious, often discontented and restless, and not seldom vicious and 
criminal. Our civilization is thus undergoing dilution. We are engorg- 
ing ourselves with crude barbarism, far beyond the possibilities of easy 
assimilation. 

2. The country towns of the East, the old-time nurseries of our na- 
tional piety, suffering from the attraction of cities and the alluring invi- 
tations of the West, in part depopulated of the former devout stock, 
and rapidly filling with foreigners, hostile or indifferent to evangelical 
religion, threaten now to paganize our future rural population. Relig- 
ious indifference replaces devoutness, and there creep in Spiritualism 
and various low forms of fanaticism, followed by lunacy, vice, and crime. 

3. In the South eight millions of freedmen and their descendants, a 
distinctive and utterly unassimilated people, doubling in numbers every 
tweuty years, of whom scarce ten per cent, can read, appeal in tones 
monitory rather than suppliant, not only to benevolence, but to patriot- 
ism, nay, even to the instinct of self-preservation. 

Among large masses of the white population of the South, illiteracy 
and degradation are as great as among the negroes. 

4. In the West, new villages and cities constantly crystallize out of 
diverse and often inferior social fragments, which come from all lands 



4 THE HOME 31HSSI0NABY. May, 

and races. Foundations are forming of future States that must be god- 
less, immoral, and dangerous if not possessed and controlled by the 
Militant Church. 

5. And even more alarming and pressing is the problem of our mod- 
ern cities. In 1800 our entire population, except some three per cent. . 
was rural. In 1850 twelve per cent, lived in cities, and now a quarter of 
our citizenship. In 2000 A. D. one third of our population will be civic. 
Commerce, manufactures, railroads, sanitary reform, and infrequency 
of wars have made it possible for enormous masses of men and women 
to swarm at certain centers. Social congestion and disease result. Pov- 
erty becomes the grievance of hundreds of thousands, vice abounds, and 
Socialism and Anarchism arise to mock at wealth and culture, and to 
assail society. Thus in New York nearly one million of human beings 
dwell in tenement-houses ; and the prevalent social depravity, which, 
like physical contagion, flourishes nowhere so virulently as in crowds, 
bids fair to rival the common personal discomfort and discontent. From 
these overcrowded retreats of human misery, churches and all self-sup- 
porting institutions of social or religious culture flee away. In 1840 
there was in New York one Protestant church to two thousand of popu- 
lation; now there is one to four thousand. A like fate seems to impend 
over all our great or growing cities. And these misbegotten, unfed, 
untaught, and unhappy multitudes are American citizens, and, at the 
ballot-box, peers of the most eminent of our voters ; their political free- 
dom, a perilous privilege for them, is a fearful menace to us. 

It is no exaggeration whatever to say that all our institutions and our 
very civilization are challenged and threatened by facts so colossal and 
portentous. 



Home Missions Ruled the Hour. — It would seem from the 
enthusiastic account in the San Francisco Pacific, that the Home Mis- 
sionary meetings recently held in Grass Valley and Nevada City were of 
unusual interest and power. The church was packed to its utmost 
capacity in the morning to listen to the sermon by Rev. Dr. Barrows, of 
San Francisco, upon the text: " I tell you that if these should hold their 
peace, the stones would immediately cry out." The sermon was of a 
high order, both in delivery and thought, and at the close the speaker 
presented an earnest appeal to young men to square their characters 
with the promptings of their higher, and better nature. The evening 
service proved literally a mass meeting, the overflow filling the Methodist 
Church. The audiences were addressed by Prof. Foster, Superintendent 
Warren, and Pastor Sink. The latter, by the way, is the author of ali 
the hymns used upon this occasion in which " Home Missions ruled 
the hour." 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 5 

ATTEMPT— EXPECT. 

BY REV. WILLABD SCOTT, OMAHA, NEB. 

How easily in these days we go West! You may go West bodily in 
I'm -t v hours with the utmost comfort, ease, and indeed, cheapness. You 
may look out on the prairies, and see the cities and the hamlets. You 
may go West verbally in four hours; telegraph a question and receive an 
answer which will ease your care, strengthen your courage, or direct your 
purpose. We may go West in four minutes sympathetically, so that im- 
pulses shall run between us, and we shall be filled with the spirit of affec- 
tion. Father, you have a son there. Mother, you have a daughter there. 
Some of you, who are older, have grandchildren there. You are already 
transferring your family there. You are fast transferring your hopes; 
and in the very wills you are drawing to-day, your name has gone, you 
interest is going, and by and by you shall be there in the persons of your 
children. Your father came to this country when it was as unknown to 
his father as Nebraska and Missouri and Dakota are, to you. We have 
the same spirit of emigration, and if our children in their turn go farther 
westward, it is because the spirit is in us. 

But here comes a vital question, — Shall those western homes be 
Christian homes? You brought up your boy in prayer ; you baptized him 
into the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Y r ou 
received him into the membership of the church which inclosed you, and 
gave God thanks for the profession. And when he went, you bade him 
God speed, as my mother bade me, saying, " My son, never forget your 
religion." He has not gone beyond, the reach of your prayer. But, I 
ask you, will his home be Christian in the land to which he has gone? 
No doubt it will be a happy home, a prosperous home, but will it be a 
Christian Home ? Remember, that separation from the old ties is not 
simply in companionship and business, but also in religion. Remember, 
that freedom from the wholesome restraints of youth is likely to breed 
negligence. Remember the desolation in those new places where the 
church is not yet, and people are liable to coldness. Remember this, that 
very many who come from the East leave their religion behind them. 
They ought to be good Christian people there; — some are, — but there are 
many who are not. You haven't done your work so well, that they are 
kept in the strong embrace of Jesus Christ. Meanwhile, dominion is 
settling down upon that western country, and I ask you, where is our 
hope, when dominion lies in a region which isn't devout ? This is not 
simply a question like the question of foreign missions— an appeal to do 
good— but a question in the line of self-preservation; in the line that 
comes to one's own door, and we have need as American people to say, 
that sad will be the day if power comes to the Mississippi and the Mis- 
souri Valley, and it is not power in the name of Christ. 



G THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

Now, to meet this question two things are necessary. The first is 
churches, and the second is strong churches. We have a good many 
churches ; there are great domains which have them not. The half lias 
not been told. On all the frontiers there are great regions which are 
not yet occupied, or being occupied. And so, when the Secretaries say 
to us, " no new work," they are not simply cutting off an opportunity, 
but leading us into absolute suicide, because the people are entering, — 
and if the gospel enters not, then what ? I'll tell you what. There are 
two cities in the State of New York, in one of which when they were 
first settled, was built a theater, and in the other, a church. The in- 
habitants of these towns carry out to-day the principles indicated by the 
spirit which built in the one place a house of amusement, and in the 
other a house of prayer. People are crowding into these western places; 
and unless the minister goes in quickly, he goes in afterward to little 
purpose. Let them be for one year without the opportunities of the 
gospel, and the second year they will not care for the opportunity. It 
is a position which you cannot recover after the days go by. Those 
waters of opportunity will never return. The babyhood of a town is like 
the babyhood of a child, and more so, because it is the babyhood of the 
mind and not of the body. We doom the neglected town to illiteracy, 
and to the Devil. And it is scriptural that all the Devil requires is an 
opportunity in vacancy, clean, swept and garnished. He doesn't need 
home missionary meetings and conventions to stir up his courage; he 
is encouraged all the time. He is swift to devise messages ; he is in 
alliance with the people themselves, and all he asks is a vacancy, and 
you are making it when you say " no new work." 

We need strong churches. I like the idea of putting up the salaries. 
I wish we could pay a thousand dollars or more, to each pioneer mis- 
sionary. It would not require so much more as you think, because 
thousand-dollar men in some of those churches would soon bring them 
to self-support. Pardoii a word of Nebraska experience. The first year 
my church had $750 aid because it seemed necessary to start with a pretty 
good salary. The next year they said, " We cau't stand so much help," 
and we cut it down to $500. Then they said, "It is of no use, we've got 
to cut the sum down again;" and they cut it down to $300. We were 
badly off, and I said, " Let's go alone," and so we did, and then began 
our prosperity. 

We started fellowship meetings in Nebraska. Two and two we went 
through the State, as did the disciples of old at their Master's com- 
mand, and we reached 95 of our 160 churches, and told them how we 
loved them. We prayed for the blessing of God upon them, and it 
came. Kevivals followed in many of those instances, and then we asked 
them to think upon the cause, to come to self-support if they could, and 
if not, to practice large benevolence, and to retrench in their expenses. 
We raised the contributions from $2,000 to $4,100, averaging more than 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 7 

fifty cents per member throughout the State, and in some instances 
more than one dollar per member. At one place they said, " Don't 
come!" but we went. We told them that they owed a debt to the 
Home Missionary Society of twenty years' standing on what they had 
received. They hadn't been paying one-tenth percentage to the Home 
Missionary Society. It would be a curse to them, as the old quails were 
in the teeth of the children of Israel. It was wonderful how tney 
straightened up under it. We took a collection the next Sunday morn- 
ing, though they had not supposed we could. We went to the oldest 
church of a city. " I don't think you'd better try it," said the pastor. 
" We are going to try it," we replied. " Well," said he, "don't ask for 
$200; there are only 347 members." " We are going to ask for 1350," 
we said. " You can't get it," said he. " It isn't our business to get it, but 
to ask." We got it. That's the way we went through that country, 
and we had a grand work. 

I tell you, friends, we don't rest on God enough. We don't have 
confidence enough in the Almighty's willingness and power. William 
Carey said, the grandest words that were ever uttered, were, "At- 
tempt great things for God, and expect great things from God." At- 
tempt, and expect nothing, and yon get nothing. Marry, and put them 
together, and what may you not get! We have not gone far enough in 
dependence on God. Brethren, Attempt ! Expect ! 



"YOU KNOW HTM!" 



I have been recently called to take a daily walk of three miles 
through deep snow to visit a man suffering with a spinal affection. Each 
day I have read to him portions of God's Word. He lives on the prairie, 
with no neighbors within a mile. He gives me glad welcome every time. 
One day he pressed my hand and said, " I want you to tell me all about 
Jesus. I want you to set me right about him. You know him, and I 
want to know him, too. I have become conscious that I am a great sin- 
ner. I know I am. Tell me what I must do." I opened up to him 
the simple way of life through Christ alone, and he listened eagerly to 
every word. A\ T e then had a precious season of prayer. I shall not soon 
forget the scene, as we knelt in that prairie home. I took the sick man's 
hand in one of mine, and that of his wife in the* other, while five little 
children gathered about us. In a cradle near by nestled two young 
babes, only a few weeks old. It was a time to pour out one's heart to 
God. He seemed very near, and spoke peace to the troubled soul. It 
was a precious season, and I felt refreshed, as I made my way home 
through the deep snow. God's Word gives light. God's Spirit lights 
up the darkest soul. — Rev, W. Edwards, Ft. Abercrombie, Dak. 



S THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

ACCEPTABLE POCKETS. 

A lady in New York City, who is confined to her home by chronic 
illness, so that she cannot attend the Ladies' Home Missionary Society of 
her church, comforts herself by working at home and sending out " Per- 
sonal Boxes." The following letter acknowledges her latest offering to a 
missionary in Nebraska. 

"Dear Friend: — The box, so kindly sent by yon, arrived safely Mon- 
day noon. Everything in it was in good order. We are inclined to 
think we are getting more than our share of good things. Nearly 
everything in this box can be put to immediate use by us. The clothing 
was soon in service. The dolls and the dishes, and the ark, were also 
making the children glad, as soon as unpacked. A doll's tea-party was 
the order of the day yesterday. The books we shall enjoy more than I 
can tell you. If the missionary's "pants pockets " always have as much 
money in them as the pair you sent, it will be an experience that he 
hasn't had in his six years in Nebraska ! However, I do not complain. 
We have had a chance to learn the Apostle's lesson of contentment, and 
I hope not in vain. 

" I am sure, if we could see you, we should all be glad to express our 
warmest thanks to you in some more emphatic way than a letter permits, 
— but the letter being the only way possible, you will have to read 
thanks as though it were spelled love. And be sure that we remember 
you in our prayers, and, more important perhaps, be sure you remember 
us in your prayers, and no doubt you do. 

"And now a few words about our work here. We came here about 
eighteen months ago. The people at that time were very much discour- 
aged, as the great adversary had been at work among them. At the end 
of the first year, the prospect was more encouraging, but the last of July 
a tornado almost destroyed our sanctuary, and many thought that the end 
of the church as an organization had come. But it was not quite so bad 
as that. It would not have been a very heavy burden for some churches, 
but it was for us, especially as some of our members lost property by the 
storm. However, in November we were in our church again. The tower, 
which was entirely destroyed, has not yet been replaced, but the necessary 
funds have been pledged, and the work will be done as soon as the weather 
permits. 

"We have received some new members lately, and shall receive more 
at our next communion. We have a Young People's Society of Christian 
Endeavor, with about twenty-five members. My wife has charge of a 
Children's Missionary Society. "Your first letter was written on my 
birthday, so I shall look upon the box as a birthday remembrance. 

" Wishing you grace, mercy and peace, from God the Father, and our 
Lord Jesus Christ, with assurance of our continual remembrance of you, 
I am gratefully yours." 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 9 

NEW RACES COMING. 

BY REV. M. W. MONTOOMEKY, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

We must begin to take into our missionary work three other races 
from the northernmost parts of the Old World, viz.: the Icelanders, 
Finns, and Russians. 

Of the total emigration to the United States, — 455,000, for ten 
months, ending October 31st, — 98,000 are Germans, 68,000 are Irish, 
(>4,000 are Norwegians and Swedes, 41,000 are Italians, 24,000 are Eng- 
lish and Welsh, 22,000 are Russians, and lit, 000 are Scotch. For fifty- 
nine years from 1820 only 38,000 Russians entered this country, but 
now we have 22,000 of them coming in ten months. What is the sig- 
nificance of the opening of this new vein of immigration from the vast 
empire of the Czar ? 

Finland is the Baltic province of Russia, and borders on Sweden 
and Norway along their extreme northern limits. Finland is about the 
size of Dakota, having 140,000 square miles of surface, one third of which 
is water. The Finns number about 2,000,000 people and were under 
the dominion of Sweden from the twelfth century until 1809, when 
Sweden secured peace with Russia by ceding Finland. 

The Finns have no race affinity with the Swedes nor with the other 
Scandinavian peoples, but are a branch of the Ugrian race, and these 
latter are said to have a Mongolian origin. They speak the Finnish 
language, but in some localities, the people, especially the upper classes, 
still cling to the Swedish tongue, and many are said to regret that they 
are not under the crown of Sweden. The Finns are an affectionate, 
honest, cleanly people ; very fond of the vapor bath ; are great readers, 
and their newspapers circulate freely among all classes, and they discuss 
politics with an enthusiasm which surpasses that of their adjoining 
Russian and Scandinavian neighbors. 

These interesting people are coming to the United States almost in a 
tidal wave. There are about 35,000 Finlanders now in the United 
States, and of these 7,000 came during six months- in 1887. They 
bring with them their love for reading and have already some six news- 
fjapers in this country published in the Finnish language. One of these 
papers is published at New York Mills, Otter Tail County, Minn.; one 
at Ashtabula, O., and one at Calumet, Mich. The Finns, like the 
Scandinavians, are inclined to be Lutherans in religion. 

The largest Finnish settlement in America occupies portions of the 
counties of Otter Tail, Becker and Hubbard in Minnesota. The next 
largest is in Frederick, Brown County, Dak. ; and other settlements are in 
Minnesota, at Thomson, on the Northern Pacific Railroad; at Franklin, 
in Renville County; at Holmes City, in Douglas County; in Dakota at Fort 
Abraham Lincoln, Morton County; at Mapes, Nelson County; in Umatilla 



10 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

County, Oregon; in Klikitat County, Washington Territory, and in all the 
mining towns of Northern Michigan. Concerning the Icelanders, Mr. 
Eggert Johannson, editor of "Heimskringla," the Icelandic newspaper 
published at Winnepeg, Manitoba, writes as follows: 

44 1 beg to tender you my sincere thanks for the kind letter of August 
27th last, and the deep interest you take in the Icelandic race. In 
answer to your inquiries I beg to say: The number of Icelanders in 
North America at the present day is about 9,000, and of these 1,500 are 
new arrivals. Of this whole number some 5,000 are in Canada, the 
principal colonies being in Manitoba and the Northwest Territory. In 
the United States there are about 4,000, the principal colonies being in 
Northern Dakota, in Pembina, Cavelier and Walsh counties. There is 
also ay Icelandic colony in Lyon and Lincoln counties, the number of 
families being about 120, and a few in Minneapolis. 

" Iceland is controlled by Denmark. The religion is Lutheran and is a 
State religion. In this connection I may, however, remark that a certain 
congregation there has succeeded in breaking away from the body of the 
State Church, and is now, by the king and council, acknowledged a 
Free Church, and the ecclesiastical work, marriage contracts, etc., con- 
summated by the pastor chosen by the congregation, acknowledged legal 
and binding — an acknowledgment not got without some hard struggles. 
Thus my countrymen see with joy the dawning of a religious liberty, 
though yet bowed down by political oppression." 

The Icelanders are Scandinavians. Iceland — 500 miles north from 
Norway and touching the Arctic Circle — was settled by the old Norse 
stock, and her people speak the oldest form of the Norwegian tongue. 
Should the present rate of immigration continue for many years Iceland 
would be depopulated. — From a forthcoming Leaflet. 



A Converted Lumberman. — A wealthy lumberman has recently 
been converted here. Two days afterward he met some of his old 
friends, who approached him with scoffs and sneers, at the stand he had 
taken for Christ. He replied, " Boys, I am going to serve God, and be 
a different man in the future from what I have been in the past." Not 
long after, he received a letter from one of these " old friends," saying, 
" I am glad you are a Christian. Stick to it. God helping me, I'll go 
with you !" — Rev. C. F. Van Auken, Essexville, Mich. 

God has a purpose in everything he does or permits, but we are so 
ignorant of the language of God's love that we fail to comprehend its 
teachings. 

I cannot express sorrow for affliction. Ought we to be sorry for that 
which burns out earthly dross, and lifts us nearer to God, and tits us for 
higher Christian service? — Rev. W. E. Sillence. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 11 

FACING DEATH. 

January, 1888. 

We have been passing through strange experiences. We were just 
getting well under way for work after a very warm and trying summer, 
and everybody was anticipating, in common phrase, a boom for Tampa 
for the winter. And indeed everything did look fair for it. We had 
heard of large numbers who were coming here from the North this 
winter. Of course as a church we hoped and expected that we won hi 
come in for some of the general strength which would accrue to the city. 
All summer we had been holding the defensive against yellow fever at 
Key West, which was in regular connection with Tampa by two lines of 
boats, but the season had so far advanced that we were congratulating 
ourselves on having escaped the contagion, and no doubt were somewhat 
boastful of the fact that our city was able to protect herself from the 
fearful scourge which prevails more or less in Havana every year, and 
occasionally at other points along the western coast of Florida. But 
about noon of October 9th the report went quickly through our streets 
that a well known citizen had yellow fever in its most malignant form. 
Of course there was a good deal of scepticism as to the real character of 
the disease for some time, until the concurrent testimony of several re- 
liable physicians declared it to be a genuine case of yellow Jack. Very 
soon several others were taken sick with the same type of fever. At 
once a general panic took possession of the people, and they fled in all 
directions. The outward bound trains were loaded to their utmost 
capacity. Every available conveyance for moving goods and families was 
in demand, and in the course of twenty-four hours, when quarantine shut 
the rest of us in on all sides, the city looked desolate enough. Many 
who left had to mortgage their homes to secure the money needed, and 
some were so beside themselves in their haste as to forget even to lock 
the doors of their houses. I never thought before that human beings 
ordinarily cool and self-possessed could become so quickly and completely 
demoralized. As for myself, I had already counted the cost of coming 
into this latitude, and decided, long in advance of the actual outbreak 
of the epidemic, that in case it should come, my post of duty would be 
right here; and, though contrary to the advice of the leading physician, 
I remained. A good many of our northern families remained here also. 
But a good many whom I counted among my congregation went with the 
crowd. Of course all kinds of business, except caring for the sick, were 
suspended. Nurses experienced in yellow fever were telegraphed for, 
and we gave ourselves up to general hospital work. 

As the epidemic spread and got stronger hold, the situation became 
indeed very serious. It was difficult to procure good care for the sick, 
and sufficient help to bury the dead. Those who were in danger of 
becoming victims to the disease did not want to take more risk than was 



12 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

absolutely necessary. Into many a family I went where every member, 
seven or eight, would be prostrated at the same time. To meet the 
wants of the sick and destitute it was necessary to organize a relief so- 
ciety, and I was put on that. So that together with my ministerial and 
pastoral duties, and furnishing physical relief, I indeed had my hands 
and heart full. We avoided public funerals at the houses, but wherever I 
could, I conducted a brief funeral service at the grave. In the necessity 
of speedy interment many were buried without any religious service. 

For three weeks I was the only Protestant minister on duty; all the 
others, with the exception of the pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
had fled, and he was at once stricken with the fever, and lo, I only was 
left! The resident Catholic priest died of the disease. Another was sent to 
fill his place. He also died, and a third was sent to hold the post. Our 
church was open for service every Sunday morning until I was attacked 
by the scourge. The audience was necessarily small, and we had no even- 
ing service, as the people generally did not dare to be out in the night 
air. For days and weeks we seemed to be walking in the very Valley of 
the Shadow of Death. But the Lord was our Shepherd and in the 
midst of it all we feared no evil. Of course our regular church work has 
been sadly broken, and it will be some time before we get back to the 
position and strength we had reached before. The long stress of anxiety 
during the summer had made busiuess very dull in the city, so that our 
people, many of whom are dependent on their daily work for a living, 
and means to help support the church, were greatly straitened. But 
we should have come out all right in a financial way had the winter 
opened without the fever. Our progress toward self-support will be 
much slower than we had hoped — and yet we trust, if we are spared a 
return of the epidemic, that next year we shall more than recover the 
vantage ground we had gained. 

What we want now is the incoming of some families of genuine Con- 
gregational stock. The opening for such a class of people is good. 
Counting out this visitation of fever, which is not likely to be repeated 
for many years, the general healthfulness of this section cannot be ex- 
celled in all our country. While only one of our members has died, 
several of our congregation have, among them an organist, whose ser- 
vices in our little church seemed almost indispensable. But God knows 
best. The work of the last three months which was thrust upon me, 
has been a very precious one. I have been able to point some souls to 
Christ at the last moment of life. I have been permitted to speak 
words of comfort to others, in their affliction ; and in general I feel that I 
have now means of access to the whole community which I could not 
have secured through any other experience. 

The fever seems to have passed by, and as a church we are getting 
under headway again. All through the epidemic, our house of worship 
was open on Sunday mornings, with the exception of two. The outlook 



1888. THE ETOMB MISSIONARY. 13 

is encouraging on the whole, though we realize that the winter will in 
many respects be far less prosperous than it otherwise would have been. 
Many of our northern friends, from fear of the disease, will avoid us. 
There are schemes on foot already, by which the city wc are sure will be 
pushed ahead the coming year, and we pray God, with all other progress 
to give us growth in the right direction as a church. We are very grate- 
ful for the aid of the A. II. M. 8., and trust that our strength will in 
the near future be equal to our entire support. There is some very in- 
teresting missionary work near by waiting to be done among the Cubans 
who, to the number of about 3,000, have come to work in the large cigar 
factories of Ybor City, which is one of the outskirts of Tampa. Though 
nominally Catholic, they care but little for that form of faith, and by a 
wise leader, could be easily persuaded, I believe, to embrace the Prot- 
estant religion. I am sure that a Spanish-speaking teacher or co'porteur, 
or missionary could do a grand work among them. Could you come 
over and help us ? — Rev. Sidney Crawford, Tampa, Fla. 



SPECIAL PROVIDENCES IN HOME MISSIONS. 

One of the most interesting publications that I read, is The Home 
Missionary. It is a modern "Acts of Apostles." It is a narrative of 
darings, and deeds, and sufferings of heroes and heroines. It is a record 
of special interpositions of divine Providence. The same, with equal pro- 
priety, might also be said of " The Missionary Herald." 

It has occurred to me, that a book prepared by one competent to the 
undertaking — by a person who might say quorum pars magna fui, with 
the above title, or something similar, would be one of great interest and 
profit. As might be expected, the history of Home Missions has abounded 
with special divine interpositions. The cause is one that is very near to 
God, and there has often been a need for his special interposition in its 
behalf, as there was at the time of the planting of the first Christian 
churches, when, in a special manner, the angels of God encamped round 
about the preachers of the gospel. The same God has given his angels 
charge over our home and foreign missionaries in these latter days. 
Many of them could relate instances not a few, of hair-breadth escapes, 
and of timely interpositions, of scarcely less interest than those experi- 
enced by Elijah and Paul. Though the day of miracles may be past, 
there have often been experienced by our missionaries, incidents border- 
ing upon the miraculous. The Home Missionary and the Missionary 
Herald have recorded many of them; and doubtless there have been 
numberless more unrecorded. Let them be gathered up, and published 
in a permanent form, for the glory of God, and the strengthening of the 
faith of his people. — Massachusetts. 



14 THE HOME MISSIONARY May, 

A CONTINUAL PICNIC PARISH— m. 

REV. C. M. SANDERS, SUPERINTENDENT, COLORADO AND WYOMING. 

After tea I took the stage for Buffalo, Wyo., one hundred and sixty- 
five miles to the northwest. To me this stage trip was an eventful one. 
It is literally jammed into my memory. You must remember that I am 
on a visit to a " Continual picnic parish," and it takes a continual picnic 
to reach it. 

From Douglas to Fort Fetterman, a distance of ten miles, I rode with 
the driver; there were two passengers inside, — the stage, — office clerk of 
Douglas, and his girl. The four horses were spirited. Every stage- 
horse is named. " What are the names of these ?" I asked. " That nigh 
leader," said the man, " is Monte ; the other leader, is Keno ; the nigh 
wheeler, is Reckless, and the other, Danger." The driver was a young 
man whose home was once sixty miles west of ISTew York City. He was 
a jolly fellow, and seemed specially interested to make it lively for the 
party inside. "I will give them a picnic" he chuckled, and he did. 
He picked out the worst holes in the £oad, and started the horses at the 
right moment every time, to give the coach a fearful jolting. I had my 
hands full to hold on. My lower arms were too short for a good anchor- 
age on the foot-board, so I was obliged to do extra duty with my upper 
ones. The party inside took it all in good part and made the old coach 
ring with laughter. 

At Fetterman, there came a change of drivers and horses, and from 
this point I was the only passenger. This driver was a coarse, profane 
man, without the slightest inclination to accommodate any one. The only 
thing he seemed really to enjoy, was the privilege of swearing. The 
night was cool, and there were no blankets in the coach, and as I 'had 
none with me, I put on my thick overcoat, then a duster, and over them 
my slicker; covered my feet with my rubbers for warmth, and climbed 
into the coach for a long ride. The driver seemed disposed to put me 
through the same course of treatment endured by the couple from 
Douglas. 

I, of course, had the liberty of all the room in the coach. I was 
privileged to occupy any part I pleased, which I did. For a while I got 
along fairly well, but the seats grew hard ; I changed position a time or 
two — sat on the back seat a while, changed over to the front seat; I 
leaned in this corner, and then in that; reclined against all the soft 
places and rubbed them into hardness. I finally took the front cushion, 
which was stiff and hard, and placed it lengthwise of the coach, an end 
on each seat, and endeavored to make up a sort of berth. Took my 
small grip- sack for a bolster, and having no newspapers, crumpled up 
two handkerchiefs for a pillow, and stretched myself for a rest. "Come, 
Sleep, Sleep !" Wearied and anxious I waited — but just as "this 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 15 

sweet restorer" was about to usher me into forgetfulness, some rock on 
the road was sure to frighten away the good angel. 

" Sleep is no servant of the will; 
It has caprices of its own: 
When courted most it lingers still, 

When most pursued, 'tis swiftly gone." 

I was reminded of the bed of which the prophet makes mention, — 
" too short," even for me; I could say with Job, " I was not in safety, 
neither had I rest, neither was I quiet ;" when I looked for good, then 
evil came unto me and when I waited for light, there came darkness." 
I changed position. I tried it on this side, and then on that. I turned 
head first and then feet first. I sat up here, and sat down there, I 
bumped and thumped and rolled and pitched, but did not sleep. How 
good it was — how indescribable indeed the relief, when a stop was made 
to change horses! 

I didn't care how long they were about it. It was of no use to com- 
plain. There was no police officer within forty gunshots, and the driver 
had it all his own way. We were away out on even the ranchless plains. 
There are but few ranches outside of the stage station between Douglas 
and Buffalo. I meditated upon Paul's instruction to young Timothy: 
"Thou therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ." 
About midnight I held a small prayer-meeting, recalling the good ad- 
monitions of a mother in Israel, given me years ago, " Try and practice 
what you preach." My prayer was short and somewhat broken — but it 
was to the point. I cried out, "Dear Lord, 1 am going quite a ways 
to do what I can to encourage and help one of your churches. I trust I 
am about your work. Now, this experience is pretty hard — I cannot 
endure much more. I do desire to live to reach my destination and to 
be able to do something after my arrival. I pray that this ride may be 
made a little easier for me." 

Perhaps you smile. I didn't — and do you know, I found it true; 
" God is our refuge and strength; a very present help in trouble." The 
Lord did hear the prayer of that poor stage- tossed home missionary su- 
perintendent. There soon came a change of drivers. The new driver 
was not a Jehu, but a John; he avoided the holes and turned away from 
the stones and sought the smooth road. I did not forget to return 
thanks. I took courage, realizing again the strength and beauty of that 
golden text : "Fear thou not ; for I am with thee : be not dismayed ; for I 
am thy God: I will strengthen thee ; yea, I will help thee." 

At four o'clock we arrived at the breakfast station; I was not hun- 
gry, but it seemed to me that I had used up my supper, and as it was 
forty miles, or thereabouts, before we should come to another place 
where food could be obtained, I felt that something must be taken to fill 
up the waste places of the inner man, and ate what I could. Then Ave 
were off again. I rode outside until the sun began to make its hot rays 



16 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

felt, when I took shelter within. By afternoon, I had so learned the 
twists and turns of the coach, had become so used to its motion, and so 
hardened to its pitching, that I rode with comparative comfort. We 
reached Buffalo at a quarter past seven, having been on the stage twenty- 
four hours, — with four drivers, and forty-four different horses, — and on 
the road from Manitou four days. For supper I ate a toasted cracker 
and drank a cup of tea; then took a sponge bath, offered my evening 
prayer and retired. 

"Kind sleep afforded me 
The boon I craved." 

The next morning found me refreshed and able to do full justice to 
the breakfast that was set before me, and really in pretty good condition, 
to attend to the duties of " The continual picnic parish." 



Missionary Cabbages. — One dollar from one of our devoted German 
home missionaries, with this message : "The inclosed was handed 
me the other day by a Christian sister, poor in worldly goods, but rich 
in faith. In handing it to me she said, 'Last spring I planted a row of 
cabbages in my garden for Home Missions, and I never saw such large 
heads ! I got this dollar for them.' * She looked happy, and I know she 
was happy. She fully realizes Christ's words, ' It is more blessed to 
give than to receive.' How easy it would be to fill the treasury of the 
A. H. M. S. if all church members had the same spirit !" 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN VIEWS. 

EXTRACTS. 

In Home Missions are found stories of the greatest trial, the most 
cruel deprivations, and the most heroic self-sacrifice. Those who have 
seen the Home Missionary, and watched him in the conduct of his work 
can appreciate this statement. 

"And that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in 
His name, beginning at Jerusalem." 

Important news travels fast. Even in the old days this was true. 
When a man has news and desires to tell it, and has a neighbor who 
desires to hear it, the news will spread. Going to take a steamboat at 
the dock at Milwaukee, I bought a paper and read the news of the death 
of General Custer and his men in their last battle at Little Big Horn. 
I went to Lake Superior on that steamboat, and then shifted to a sail- 
boat, and in seven days was at Red Rock, an Indian village near the 



1SSS. THE HOME MLSXIOXARY. 17 

mouth of the Nepigon River, which empties into Luke Superior from the 
north. No steamboat, no m;iil of any regular kind had been received 
there for two weeks. We at once hired guides and canoes, bitting by 
our lirst camp lire I heard the Indians chatting about the death of 
" Yellow Hair " and his men. Jn eight days the news of the battle had 
been carried by Indian methods more than a thousand miles. So it is 
not remarkable that " the good news " brought from heaven to earth by 
Jesus Christ should have spread so far and so widely, even in the lirst 
century. Andrew hears something good to hear, and " he lirst findeth 
his own brother, Simon,'' and tells him. ".Jesus finds Philip, and Philip 
finds Nathaniel." A Samaritan woman meets Jesus at a well and talks 
with him; she forgets her errand, goes her swift way into the city, and 
says to everybody she meets, " Come, see a man who told me all things 
that ever 1 did: is not this the Christ ?" You are familiar with the 
long journeys of St. Paul. Not content to settle in one city or any city, 
he s;ivs, 'J must see Pome also." He touches all sorts and conditions 
of men, and talks to all. and tells one thing. Sometimes he is before 
kings, and sometimes he is with sailors. He talks to his jailer, and to 
the Roman soldier to whom he is chained; and not long after he is a 
prisoner at Pome, we read that he has brethren in Caesar's household. 
When he can travel no more he writes the good news. He is a debtor to 
the Jew, the Greek, the Roman, and the barbarian. He holds to the 
doctrine that good news is not a private possession, but is to be shared. 
It is a debt to be paid to all men. 

If we are not missionaries ourselves, we like to see them and read 
about them. I never stop "twenty minutes for dinner" at Portage, 
Wisconsin, without thinking of Father Marquette, with his canoe on 
his shoulders, making the loug " carry " between the Fox River emptying 
into the known, and the Wisconsin, running south and west toward the 
unknown. The Foreign Missionary is a more picturesque object than 
the Home Missionary. He has distance, perspective — an easier subject 
for a poem or an oration, I should say. But, if it is a question of toil, 
hardship, and self-denial, I believe I would, in debate, take the side of 
the Home Missionary. As you look out of the car window, you will see, 
between here and the Pacific, many steeples. Nearly all of them rep- 
resent home missionaries. A great deal of work has been put into the 
foundation under the sometimes homely finger that points to the sky. 

From steady reading of The Home Missionary one gets many good 
stories of men and women who had the charity that hopes all things, and 
believes all things, and never fails. There is an unwritten history of 
the planting of the gospel in the West. Men and women and children 
have had to " go without " to do it. Self-sacrifice is necessary for a while 
longer. This church sent a box of good and necessary things to a mis- 
sionary ;ip in Wyoming. I trust it reached him before the mercury 
froze in his cheap thermometer. Let us hope that he has no thermom- 



18 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

eter. I am never so cold as when I know how cold it is. I seem to 
adjust myself and go down with the mercury. 

Unquestionably it takes a good man and his wife in a country pecul- 
iarly money-making, to stay out of the general occupation and preach 
the gospel to a handful of people, from the standpoint of a Home Mis- 
sionary. I should think that the missionary of our mountain towns 
would in going to his appointments be tempted to turn aside and look 
for minerals. We must honor him if he walks straight on, and thinks 
only of the words of eternal life. Think of " the one thing" he does 
and of the many things that he refuses, and honor him more. 

America is a kind of mixing pot of the nations. We found the 
Indian here, we brought the negro here, and men of every nation have 
found us. 

Minneapolis has the largest Norwegian population of any city in the 
world except the capital city of Norway. We now have in the United 
States more than one fourth of all the Norwegians on earth. The need 
for going out to all the earth is somewhat lessened by the fact that all 
the earth is coming to us. If we have any good news to tell, we cer- 
tainly have a great opportunity to tell it, to men of every race. They 
are our next door neighbors. I believe myself that a vivid sense of obli- 
gation to God, a vivid sense of a day of judgment, a vivid sense of Jesus 
Christ, helps a man mightily to be good in his family, good in his 
neighborhood, good in his city and in his State. Convince anybody 
that there is no God, no life to come — and I do not believe that a corner 
lot in Denver would be worth any more than it was in Sodom. Intelli- 
gent selfishness will say that a church is a good thing for a town. A 
class of people that some churches have no use for, have use for some 
churches. For good reason the gamblers of Leadville have been the 
friends of the churches there, and of some of the men who have manned 
those — notably of that Home Missionary, Eev. Thomas Uzzell, now of 
the People 's Tabernacle down on Blake Street. 

To conclude, let me say that I have seen many a promising camp fire 
put out by piling on too much green wood, and also by neighbors who 
came too early to borrow fire. The country has now, in my humble 
opinion, taken in about as much foreign material as it can digest and 
assimilate. Seven thousand a week is rather too much just now at 
Castle Garden. Let us make a legal distinction between the people over 
the sea who desire to come here because they desire to become Americans, 
and those who come here for revenue only. Why put a tariff on pauper- 
made goods, and admit pauper labor, free? The best service America 
can render to the countries over the sea is to keep her own orig- 
inal fire Avell fed and burning brightly, so that the oppressed people of 
all the world can see the great light of the West — the Star of Bethelehem 
— multiplied. — Rev. M. )Y. Reed, in the " Rocky Mountain News." 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 19 

Only a Step. — Brother W. D. Webb, of White City, Kan., seemed to 
be in perfect health the day he died. We were holding revival services, 
and during the afternoon he said to me, "Preach the simple gospel to- 
night. Make it as plain as you can." lie sat in plain sight of me during 
the service, and his beaming face testified to his enjoyment of it. At 
the close of the sermon he came forward, and seated himself in a chair 
near the pulpit evidently intending to speak after the singing of a 
hymn. AVhile we were singing the first verse, " Come over the line, it is 
only a step," he was stricken with paralysis, and died in two hours and 
twenty minutes. The hearts of the people were very tender as they laid 
him away, and they begin now to realize in some measure what he has 
been to them. — Rev. W. G. Veazie, Junction City, Kan. 



THE CHRISTIAN EMPIRE. 

T. W. HOIT. 

O, strike the golden lyre, 

A song of triumph raise, \ 

And speak your strong desire | 

In notes of loudest praise: 
For lo ! His standard is unfurled — 
We claim for Christ the Western world. 

His are these smiling plains, 

And His the rolling sun; 
Supreme in power He reigns, 
The omnipresent One: 
For lo! His standard is unfurled — 
We claim for Christ the Western world. 

The Lily of the Vale 

And Rose of Sharon, fair, 
Shall flourish and prevail 
In heavenly beauty there: 
For lo! His standard is unfurled — 
We claim for Christ the Western world. 

Let all the nations come, 

Their vows to freedom pay; 
Let scoffing lips be dumb, 
Christ is the Truth and Way: 
For lo! His standard is unfurled — 
We claim for Christ the Western world. 



Father, assist us now; 

O, Holy Spirit, bless, 
Till every knee shall bow 
And every tongue confess: 
For lo! His standard is unfurled — 
We claim for Christ a ransomed world. 
St. Louis, February 10, 1888. 



20 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

The new church in Wallace, Kansas, was dedicated Jan. 22d, Brother 
Broad preaching the sermon. It is an attractive and well located struc- 
ture 40 by 20, with tower, and cost with furniture $2,000. Only about 
$170 is unpaid on the building which is nearly covered by subscriptions. 
The small remaining amount due on the pews and organ is to be paid in 
installments by this energetic church and community. Much credit 
for this good financial exhibit is due to the pastor, Rev. Thos. Marsh, 
who has labored with untiring zeal both in the temporal and spiritual 
interests of the church. On the same lot with the church, is a neat 
parsonage costing about $1,000, which was mostly contributed by the 
Connecticut Woman's Home Missionary Union. Sunday, Jan. 22d, was 
a joyful day for this new, earnest, and most westerly of our churches in 
the central portion of Kansas. 

Rev. George Belsey, of Lead City, Dakota, has received and ac- 
cepted a call to the pastorate of the new Congregational Church of 
Kane, Pa. This church, which was organized on the 29th of last De- 
cember, with a membership of twenty-five, now numbers forty. They 
start out with the determination to "run alone" and do without aid 
from the Home Missionary Society. They have purchased for $1,100 a 
fine corner lot, on which they intend to build- Plans have been adopted 
for a building to seat 300, on which work will be commenced right away. 

It is hoped to dedicate free of debt, and to this end the friends are 
making great efforts. It will, however, be a great struggle, and help 
from the sister churches will be thankfully received by the pastor,or A. 
Y. Jones, Clerk. 

A contribution in gold was sent by a Srmday-school in Northamp- 
ton, Mass., (Mr. F. R. Drake, Superintendent), to a home missionary 
Sunday-school in Howard City, Dak., about which we have a pleasant 
message from the pastor. He says : " Yesterday I gave my Sunday- 
school that twenty dollars from Northampton. I presented it in the 
form of a story, and no suspicion was awakened until I handed out the 
gold piece. You should have heard the expressions of delighted surprise. 
The superintendent tried to respond, but his eyes filled with tears, and 
he almost broke down. The school passed a hearty vote of thanks, and 
a copy of that resolution has been sent to the school at Northampton." 

The Tabernacle Congregational Church of Joplin, Mo., Rev. 
J. Wesley Johnson, pastor, has recently been reopened with very im- 
pressive services. The improvements have added very much to the ap- 
pearance, comfort and convenience of the church. The building has 
been newly carpeted, repainted, and fitted up in a style worthy of the 
pastor and congregation. Great credit is due the Ladies' Society, under 
whose auspices the new improvements have been carried on. 



is.ss. 77/ A' 110 Ml- UIS^IOS'MIY. 21 

Roman's gcjttivtmcnt. 



"The work of our hands— establish Thou it" 
How often with thoughtless lips we pray; 
But lie who sits iu the heaven shall say, 

" Is the work Of your hands so lair and tit 
That ye dare so pray?" 

Softly avc answer, " Lord, make it fit— 

Tiie work of our hands, I hat so we may 
Lift up our eves and dare to pray, 

"The work of our hands — establish thou it,' 
Forever and aye " 



The list of Woman's Home Missionary Organizations may be found, 
hereafter, upon the last page of the Magazine ; also, the list of States 
not yet organized. "Would it not be encouraging and helpful to each 
new society, when it joins the sisterhood, to receive an official letter of 
welcome and sympathy from those already organized ? 



The Woman's Fund for Missionary Salaries may be found at the close 
of the receipts. 



A new feature of the annual meeting of our Woman's Department at 
Saratoga in June, will be an address to young ladies by the authoress of 
that attractive leaflet, " Coming Out." There is also a pleasant prospect 
of good speakers from the field. Young ladies, let us welcome you to 
Saratoga this year. 



Our faith has been greatly strengthened of late by the steady increase 
of intelligent interest in Home Missions, among the women of these 
United States. In 1886, we, representing the fourteen Home Missionary 
Organizations of this country, appealed to other States to join the noble 
sisterhood. Iowa, alone, responded. In 1887, we were permitted to 
extend greetings to the new Nebraska Union, only. Nevertheless, the 
seed sown during these waiting years did not perish, and our hearts are 
made glad by the addition of two new Unions within two months. 
Would that this experience might continue in the months to come, until 
the women of our forty-four States and Territories shall thus have clasped 
hands for God and our Native Land! 

Another cause for thanksgiving is an increasing desire among women 
for a more intelligent comprehension of the present needs of our land. 
In the old times we ignored any need of a Home Missionary which could 
not be met with the scissors and needle. We did not study, or even read 



22 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

missionary literature. The soul, mind, and body were absorbed in prepar- 
ing, packing, and sending away multiplied boxes into missionary homes. 

What change has come over us ? Simply this : While we send not 
one box less to relieve the pressing needs of the missionary, we have 
begun to study about his field, his work — all the fields, and all the work 
of this Society, and of its sister societies who stand together with this, 
to meet the present crisis in our land. Moreover, we are not satisfied 
simply to provide the missionary with clothing, we want to make him 
our representative in the field. We want to feel that through him, 
we are at work there, and so we become responsible for the whole or a 
part of his salary. 

This intelligent interest is revealed to us by a constantly increasing 
demand for our literature. We cannot but hope that its liberal distribu- 
tion, may, during the coming year, bring enlarged gifts to our treasury. 



FLORIDA! 

Last December, Florida asked this question: "How shall we go to 
work to form a State Union?" With hearty alacrity each sister Union 
of the sixteen organizations, furnished the applicant with the story of its 
own methods and experiences. Then came this: — 

" Winter Park, Fla. Jan. 20, 1888.— The ladies of the Home Mis- 
sionary Society of this place passed a vote of thanks, at their last meeting, 
for the encouraging and helpful words so kindly sent to us, with leaflets, 
reports, and suggestions from the various State Unions. We are probably 
the youngest band of home missionary workers, and we ask a continued 
interest in your prayers. We hope soon to form a State Union. Mrs. L. 
W. Capen, Sec." 

" March 13, 1888. — During the meeting of the Congregational Asso- 
ciation, held at Interlachen, A Florida Woman's State H. M. Union 
was formed. President, Mrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville ; Vice-President, 
Mrs. P. T. Hall, Jacksonville ; Treasurer, Mrs. L. C. Partridge, Long- 
wood ; Secretary, Mrs. Nathan Barrows, Winter Park. It is our desire 
to become a recognized member of the family. 

Florida is a big State, and has thirty-five Congregational churches, 
for the most part small and feeble, only one of which is self-supporting ; 
but it is our aim to have an auxiliary in every one of them. Please 
wheel us into line ! — Mrs. JV. Barroivs, Sec." 

We have been watching somewhat anxiously for this Florida Union. 
Would the courage of these few consecrated women hold out to organize 
for State work, in a field so immense, with so scant a supply of laborers ? 
We seem to hear the Master's voice: "0, woman, great is thy faith; be it 
unto thee, even as thou wilt." With grateful hearts we joyously " wheel" 
you " into line," and give you the united greetings of the sisterhood. 



1888. TEE HOME MISSIONARY. 23 

HOW CALIFORNIA CAME INTO LINE. 

A few moments before the "copy" of the April Home Missionary 
went to the printer, came the joyful tidings that California women 
had joined the ranks of those who believe in organized effort for the 
redemption of our land. We are now furnished with the method by 
which this happy result was accomplished. 

A Woman's Home Missionary Society was formed in the First Con- 
gregational Church of Oakland, Nov. 12, 1886. The meetings constantly 
increased in interest, which was intensified by the reading of missionary 
letters at each session. Monthly envelopes were obtained and distrib- 
uted, — and at the first annual meeting they were able to report $259.80. 

A new impulse was given to this little band of home missionary 
women by the presence, and inspiring words of Mrs. E. S. Williams, 
President of the Minnesota W. H. M. Society. 

Undoubtedly the Oakland society was the nucleus, and origin of the 
State society. These devoted women were in earnest, and this is the 
way they went to work : a few weeks before the meeting of the Gen- 
eral Association of California they prepared and sent seventy-six pack- 
ages to seventy -six Congregational pastors in the State. Each package 
contained a copy of the report of the Woman's Department of the A. 
H. M. S., some of our best leaflets, and a strong appeal for a Woman's 
State Organization. Of course they were successful ! At that meeting 
the California W. H. M. Society sprang into being. Its organization was 
fully completed at an adjourned meeting in Novembei*, 1887, and its first 
quarterly meeting was held last February. The thirteen earnest women 
who braved a heavy storm to attend this meeting, spent most of the time 
in devotional exercises. The first five auxiliaries were reported, as 
having been organized in the First, and Plymouth Avenue Congregational 
Churches of Oakland, Golden Gate, Saratoga, and Grass Valley. May 
long life, and spiritual prosperity attend this child of faith and prayer! 



MINNESOTA. 



This W. H. M. S. which took the lead in woman's work for Home 
Missions in 1872 has recently added fresh interest to the cause by a 
successful annual home missionary mass meeting, for the women of Min- 
neapolis. The secretary, Mrs. Chase, tells us that they draped three large 
United States flags high up on the wall of the church, facing the audience, 
and beneath them, ten different foreign flags, — the Chinese dragon form- 
ing a striking center piece among the latter. There was telegraphic greet- 
ing " from the City of the Angels, — the present retreat of their president — 
to the angels of the Minneapolis churches in their heavenly mission." 



24 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

Mrs. Jenkins in her address " Our Sunday-schools for missions," took 
the ground that every Sunday-school should be a Mission Band, — an 
advance upon the plan of " a mission band in every Sunday-school." 
The president, Mrs. Williams, sent a ^ good paper." from California, 
entitled, "E Pluribus Ununr" showing that through Christ alone could 
our present " pluribus" (so much more truly pluribus than the original 
one), be made " unum." The foreign work of the society was represented 
by Mr. Montgomery, Mrs. Coleman, Miss Elwell, Mrs. Torrey, and Miss 
Fanny Boohek. In the French department they received communica- 
tions from Secretary Coit, Treasurer Palmer, and Mr. Amaron of Massa- 
chusetts. The exercises included speakers in behalf of the A. M. A., the 
N. YV. E. Com., and the A. C. U. Much interest and gratification were 
expressed by the large audience. This Woman's Union has determined 
to raise $5,000 this year for the A. H. M. S. 



TO THE POINT. 



The New Nebraska W. H. M. U. gives its plan of work as follows : 
(1) Subscription list passed around. (2) Envelope system. Pledge a 
sum payable at each society meeting. (3) A Missionary Box in the 
home as an object lesson. To know about the work, subscribe for The 
Nebraska Congregational Neios, and The Home Missionary. 



Tiie Perseverance of one Saint. — A lady in Meriden, Ct. — 
not a lady of "elegant leisure" — determined to comfort the hearts of a 
few home missionaries with the luxury of the " Sunday School Times," 
fresh from the office. After some thinking and writing, walking and 
talking, she has succeeded in furnishing sixty-eight home missionaries 
with this valuable paper, fresh and new, and has also sent three com- 
plete files of the same paper to an institution at the front. Each mis- 
sionary will doubtless appreciate this effort, but he will think all the 
more of the gift because of the letter, which she also found time to 
write, showing her thorough interest in his work. 



A PRECIOUS SERVICE. 

Missionary life on the frontier is not all sunshine, neither is it 
all shadow. This has certainly been a hard winter, and to keep an ap- 
pointment with an eighteen mile ride before you, with the thermometer 
twenty or more degrees below zero, has required a good deal of moral, 
as well as physical courage ; but now that the backbone of winter is 
broken, we are looking forward to the summer work with renewed in- 
terest. 



isss. THE HOME MISSlOXMtV. 25 

I would like to take the readers of The Home Missionary with me on 
a visit to the home of one 6t the pioneers of this great Northwest, in 
one of the three fields of which my husband has charge. We must take 
a drive of six miles from our home here, before reaching this home. 
We find the head of the house, the good old deacon, who has lived 
the allotted time of man, prostrated upon a bed of sickness, we fear 
never to rise again. About twenty persons have gathered ready for a 
short preaching service and at its close to take into the membership of 
the little church, two of the number, a son of the deacon, and his 
wife. The latter is in the prime of life, but the dread disease, con- 
sumption, has placed its stamp upon her, and a few short weeks, perhaps 
(lavs, are all that is left to her of this life. It could not help but be a 
precious meeting to us, for with these two so near the border of the 
spirit land, it almost seemed us if we caught a glimpse into the un- 
seen world. The sweet communion service brought the blessed Savior 
very near. We hope this may he but the beginning of greater things 
for this little church, and with an addition of twelve to one of the other 
two churches, we cannot but feel that God's blessing has followed the 
work of the past. — Mrs. D. W. Morgan, Detroit, 21 inn. 



(Dxxv ^Jcmncj JYopte. 



You will notice, that with this number, The Home Missionary cele- 
brates her sixty-first birthday. I hope you are better acquainted with your 
venerable friend than you have ever been before. And now, during the 
coming year, be very faithful to her. Read her messages to you. Try 
and carry out her plans to help this great Society which belongs to you 
as much as it belongs to your father and mother. Look up the places 
on the map, about which you read. Be true patriots — and study your 
own land. Find out what is going on here. Don't be content to read 
the Young People's Department, only. Read the whole. Take up one 
State at a time, and make a study of it. W T rite to the editor about your 
mission circle. Answer the questions. Send your pennies to the 
treasurer, and do all this for Christ's sake. 



BANNER STATE THIS MONTH. 

Ix Contributions — Massachusetts. 

f.St Answers to Questions — New Hampshire. 

During this 3 r ear the Banner State will be that State whose young 
people send the greatest number of answers to the Questions, and the 
largest contributions in mouey. As we shall close up the account every 
month, all the States have equal opportunity to be represented. 



26 TEE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

HOME MISSIONARY NEWS. 

We shall try this year to furnish you with a monthly chapter of mis- 
sionary news, which will contain all that we know of what our young 
j>eople are doing for Home Missions. If you have any items of interest, 
please send them to the editor. 

In Minneapolis, Minn., the young people have a " Help-one-another 
Club." They hold meetings, and give in "testimonies" which must be 
very interesting. 

Two boys in Norwalk, Ct., send fifty cents "for the debt." They 
think it will, at least, go a little way to help, and by and by they hope 
to send more. 

The little daughter of a German missionary in Minnesota sends us 
$1.00, and says, " You may put it where most needed. I earned it all 
myself running errands. My wish is that God will bless every cent of 
it. I pray that God will bless The Borne Missionary, and the Home 
Missionary Society." 

A ten-year-old boy in Fitchburg sends $1.00 and says, " I would like 
to give you more, but I belong to the 'Earnest Workers,' and have to 
give my money to them, so I can't afford to give you any more just now, 
but you will hear from me again by and by." 

This from four children in Suffield, Ct., the youngest of whom 
prints his name in very large capitals. It is written to Mr. Schauffler : 
"Mamma has been reading to us about your Bible Headers' school for 
Bohemians, and that you need more money for it. We pity those poor 
Bohemians, and we want to help them. So with papa's and mamma's 
help we make up one dollar for you. We hope a great many of those 
Bohemian children will learn to love Jesus." 

Harwinton, Ct., is a country place, and the houses are scattered over 
the hills ; therefore it is very difficult to get about among the people, 
and raise money for missionary work. A lady there has a Sunday-school 
class of twelve boys. She has formed them into a club, called " The Try 
in Earnest Club." These Try-in-Earnest boys go over the hills to 
those scattered houses and collect money for Home Missions. They like 
to go, and the people like to have them come. 

The "Joyful Workers," of Spokane Falls, W. T.,— Kosine M. Ed- 
wards, Secretary,— send us $4.75. They organized in May, 1887. The 
society is composed of girls from ten to twenty years old, and their aim 
is to help the missionary cause. As their church is a home missionary 
church they give one half of their money to that. The girls are getting 
up an entertainment to raise money enough to buy a communion service 
for this little church. The young secretary says that when they break 
their jugs they will send us some more money. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 27 

The " Mount Hermon Band" of boys, in Ware, Mass., are not yet 
tired of home missionary work. In fact, they are more wide awake than 
ever, and continually devising new ways to raise money for the good 
cause. Their recent temperance entertainment was a complete success. 
They delighted the audience with music and recitations, ending the 
good time with a temperance dialogue, and ice cream. Admission ten 
cents. They cleared fifty-three dollars. Somebody must have been glad 
to rest, when it was over, and we suspect it was the devoted lady who 
has these boys in charge. A pleasant letter from the secretary, Hugh 
M. Scott, assures us of their warm interest in our work. He says they 
have been studying about the Bohemian boys, and have raised some 
money for the Bohemian work, also for the French work. These 
" Mount Hermon" boys have a bright red card, on which is printed 
"Mount Hermon Band, Honorary Member," which they sell to older 
people for twenty-five cents. We have yet to learn to what privileges 
the "Honorary Member" is entitled, but we do know that he is not 
allowed to vote ! 



WHAT THEY HAVE BEEN DOING. 

From a Young People's Mission Circle : — I am authorized by 
our Mission Circle to write you what we have been doing the past winter. 
We took up for a topic, China, and have had some very interesting 
meetings, about the Chinese — their manners, their customs, and their 
religion, which teaches that man has two or three souls, and that they 
lived in several different beasts and reptiles before they came into a 
human body. The last state of the soul is sleep, and that is called Nir- 
vana. We hope that they may soon know of the true God, and live for 
him, and learn to pray to him instead of to their idols. The young 
people are getting roused up, so that they are coming and joining the 
circle, and now we have a membership of about one hundred. We 
gave a very successful entertainment on Thursday evening, February 
23d; the programme was our regular Chinese recitations, etc., after 
which we served ice cream and cake to a full house. — Jonathan Sim- 
mons, Sec, Gilbertville, Mass. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 

The following correct answers to our list of questions, are furnished 
by Jessie Lane, Detroit, Mich., Harris Hubbard, Iroquois, Dak., and 
"The Lois Jewett Club," Webster, N. H. 

31. Where has Superintendent Albrecht gone? 
A. Niigata, Northern Japan. 

32. What is the name of the new Superintendent, who has taken 
his place ? 



28 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

A. Rev. Moritz E. Eversz. 

33. What Society does this Magazine represent? 
A. The American Home Missionary Society. 

34. Are you trying to help this Society? 
A. Yes/ 

35. Why? 

A. Because of the good work which this Society has heen doing for 
so many years, and the great need that this work should he carried on. 
— " The Lois Jewett (Mh." 

36. How are you helping this Society? 

A. By giving our time, money, sympathy, and prayers. 

37. How old is the American Home Missionary Society? 
A. Sixty-two years old. 

38. In what year was it born? 
A. May 10, 1826. 

39. Were there any other home missionary societies in our country, 
then ? 

A. There were. 

40. What were their names ? 

A. The Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians, and 
others in North America ; The Missionary Society of Connecticut ; The 
Berkshire and Columbia Missionary Society ; and The Massachusetts 
Missionary Society. There were a few other local societies in New Eng- 
land and New York. 

41. Where did these societies send missionaries? 

A. Some sent them into destitute parts of their own States, some 
to northern parts of New England, and some to the banks of the Mis- 
sissippi. 

44. Why was the American Home Missionary Society started ? 

A. Because a more economical, and much better system was needed 
to support the missionaries, and build churches in the western States 
and Territories. 

43. Who first suggested such a society? 
A. Nathaniel Bouton. 

44. Where was he going at the time? 

A. From Andover to Newburyport, Mass. 

45. Tn what was he riding? 
A. A stage-coach. 

46. Who were his companions? 
A. Several theological students. 

47. What effect did his suggestion have upon these companions ? 

A. They became very much interested, talked about the subject a 
good deal during the ride in the stage-coach, and afterwards wrote about 
it in the newspapers. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 29 

One young girl answers question 36 in this way: " I hope I help the 
Homo Missionary Society when I let my mamma go away to speak, and 
do not make any fuss al>out it." 

48. Why did certain eminent ministers of New England go to Bos- 
ton, Mass., Jan. 11. 1826 ? 

49. In what city was The American i Lome Missionary Society formed? 

50. How many people came together to form it, and in what church 
did they meet? 



AUNT NABBY'S PROPOSITION. 

Do you remember Aunt Nabby's proposition to you on " The Home 
Missionary's birthday' ' just one year ago? Let me recall it, that I may 
tell you what came of it. 

A mother gave her little boy two bright new pennies and asked him 
what he was going to do with them. After a moment's thought the 
child replied, " I am going to give one to the missionaries, and with 
the other I am going to buy a stick of candy." After a while he re- 
turned from his play and told his mother that he had lost one of the 
pennies. "Which did you lose?" she asked. " I lost the missionary 
penny," he promptly replied. 

When Aunt Nabby read this in TJie Home Mhsitnw.ry, she took off 
her glasses and put on her "thinking cap." It seemed to her that a 
great many missionary pennies had been lost in this way. So she wrote 
a letter to the young people who read "The Home Missionary," advising 
them to make the same " divide" of all the pennies given to them, or 
earned, that this little fellow did, but to be sure and have a good strong 
box to drop the Missionary penny into, so that it couldn't get lost, before 
the time came to send it to the Home Missionary Society. Then she 
promised on The Home Missionary" s next birthday — ten cents to each of 
the first ten boys and girls who should respond to this appeal; 

And now comes a letter from Windsor Locks, Ct. , telling of the first ten 
boys and girls who accepted AuntNabby's proposition. How did it hap- 
pen that they were all from one town? It seems that their minister's wife 
went to the great meeting of this Society, at Saratoga, last June. When 
she came home she wanted to raise some money for a suffering family 
in Dakota, so she placed a missionary box on a shelf in the dining 
room, and every time any member of the family left the door open 
between the dining room and kitchen, a contribution must be put into 
that box. When it was opened they found in it, ten dollars ! The chil- 
dren in that place became quite enthusiastic over Aunt Xabby, and 
so a young woman living in the minister's family made ten fancy boxes 
for those who wished to accept her proposition. Of course the old lady 
has kept her promise, and the minister's wife says she is making 
preparations to invite these ten boys and girls to the parsonage, give 



30 THE HOME MISSIONART. May, 

them each the extra ten cents, read them a letter from Aunt Nabby, 
and the story of "The Easter Penny" from the December Home 
Missionary. After which she will serve them with hot chocolate and 
other good things. My impression is that these young people expect to 
follow the " Easter Penny" plan during the coming year. 



THE MISSIONARY BARREL. 

Some time ago I received a letter from a young lady in Cambridge, 
111., informing me that a Society of Young Ladies would like to send 
me a " barrel." Would such a barrel as a young society could send be 
acceptable? From the letter one would have thought that the barrel 
might have been removed from the station without the aid of even a 
hand-cart! Two days before Christmas I took that barrel on a pair of 
bob sleighs down to the parsonage. 

It was a family opening. You can imagine how pleased we were to 
receive good warm clothing for each member of the family. I went to 
church, and saw the old year out, dressed in a new suit of clothes. 
Among many other gifts my wife received a new bonnet. I often hear 
the expression among the people, " How very becoming !" In point of 
fact it seems to me to be one of the most becoming bonnets she ever 
wore. Dresses and other garments were snugly packed in. We found a 
doll, called Ida, and a new cradle, and scrap-books, and a harmonica, 
etc. The doll has received a vast amount of attention, and the har- 
monica is a source of continual pleasure to our little boy. 

Perhaps one of the most pleasing incidents in connection with the 
barrel was the initiation of our little four-year-old son into coat and 
pants. After donning his new suit he put up his left hand, and in 
imitation of our church service, pronounced the benediction. I have 
penned these lines to assure our young friends that there is great joy in 
the reception of a good barrel ; and if our joy is great, and our gratitude 
goes forth, your joy must indeed be great, who with nimble fingers and 
willing, loving hearts, remembered us so generously at Christmastide. — A 
Home Missionary in Dakota. 



The monthly statement of the "Young People's Bohemian Fund," 
will be found at the close of the Receipts. 



FOR THE LITTLE ONES. 

Two little eyes to look to God ; 
Two little ears to hear his word ; 
Two little feet to walk his ways ; 
One little mouth to sing his praise ; 
Two little hands to do his will, 
And one little heart to love him still. 



IHSS. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 31 



Rev. John A. Hamilton, D.D., Secretary. 
Rev. Theodore Y. Gardner, Western Secretary. 
James M. Gordon, Esq., Ireasurer. 
10 Congregational House, Boston. 

[Money for the Society may be sent to James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer, No. 10 
Congregational House, Boston ; or to Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., 34 Bible 
House, New York.] 

Colorado College. — Colorado College is located centrally in a State 
which has the material basis for a large population and great power. 
The area of the State would cover Switzerland six times and leave a rem- 
nant as large as New Hampshire, physically. The location of the college 
at Colorado Springs is all that could be desired. The climate, the scenery, 
and the society are of the best. For foundation, the college has a campus 
of thirty acres, and a valuable reservation of twenty acres. These were 
donated by Colorado people. On the campus is a fine college building. 
This is of stone, and was erected by the liberality of the citizens. There 
is a library of about six thousand volumes ; various scientific apparatus ; 
and a thorough outfit for assaying, and metallurgical illustrative work. 
The courses of instruction are four, of which two are preparatory. The 
classical course corresponds to that of the better class of our eastern col- 
leges. The college is distinctively Christian, but not sectarian. It has 
a responsible Board of Trustees. 

Colorado people have honored themselves by their generous gifts to 
the college. They are now planning to meet a certain special and im- 
perative need ; that is, to build a Ladies' Hall, and Club House, from 
lack of which the college is at great disadvantage. Surely, the noble 
devotion of the friends of the college, east and west, who, knowing, 
many of them very intimately, its history, its condition and its needs ; 
and who, seeing, beyond the limitations of the present, the grand college 
that is to be, have stood by it in all weathers, and will continue to stand 
by it, is the strongest possible testimony to its worth. All the friends 
of Christian education who desire to see Colorado College solidly set up 
for its work are invited to take hold together, that the college may 
secure the amount of endowment now needed. Two hundred thousand 
dollars would place this college on an excellent footing. 

Gifts and pledges and remembrance in wills are invited. — Address 
Prof. G. N. Marden, 13 Tremont Place, Boston, Mass. 



One of the two great objects of The American College and Educa- 
tion Society is to aid deserving young men in preparing for the Christian 
ministry. In its history of seventy years its beneficiaries have numbered 
more than 7,000. They have been among the most able, and consecra- 
ted representatives of the pulpit of the older States, and foremost in the 
establishment of churches in the new West. 



32 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



^pjxoiutmjmts in HJXartlr, 1888. 



Not in commission last year. 

Bears, Alfred H.,Lead City,>3o. Dak. 

Brodhead, W. Henry, Denver, Colo. 

Brown, William M., Blue Rapids, Kan. 

Crawford, J. (.'., Nickerson an<l out-station, Kan. 

Davies, David M., Bevier, New Cambria aud 
Kbenezer, Mo. 

De Long, D. 1)., Arkansas City, Kan. 

IK- Long, Thomas W., Ainsworth, Neb. 

Dickinson, Samuel W., .Minneapolis, Minn. 

Oilman, William L., Harmon, Colo. 

May, Jacob, York and Sutton, Neb. 

Nelson, Andrew H., Marinette, Menomonee and 
Minnekauue, Wis. 

Rogers, Alonzo, Blair, Neb. 

Rouse, Fred. T. , West Superior, Wis. 

Runyan, William s.\ Grates Valley, Michigan Val- 
ley and Rose Bush, Or. 

Stowell, Alexander D., No. Lawrence and Stock- 
holm Depot, N. Y. 

Thompson, Gilbert T., Nicholas Junction, Mo. 

Re-commissioned. 

Barnes, George B., Hankinson, Forman and Har- 
lem, No. Dak. 

Battey, George J., Canova, Carthage and out-sta- 
tions, So. Dak. 

Bickford, Levi F., Olivewood and Monk Hill, So. 
Cal. 

Cole, Henry H., Tucson, Ariz. 

Dada, William B., Coloma, Mich. 

Davies, James, Pullman aud Union Flat, Wash. 
Ter. 

Dawson, William E., Seattle, Wash. Ter. 



Drake, Andrew J., Iroquois, Esmond and vicinity, 

So. Dak. 
Eldridge, John W., Beaverton, Or. 
Griffiths, Griffith, Alturas, So. Fork, Canby and 

Centerville, Cal. 
Hall. KussellT., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Efobart, Miss Clara, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Hood, E. Lyman, Sante Fe, New Mex. 
Houlding, Horace W., Prescott, Ariz. 
Jewell, J. Spencer, Albuquerque, New Mex. 
Johnson, Alfred P., Springfield, Mo. 
Keene, Aaron H., New England City, No. Dak. 
Kelsey, Lysander, Washoiigal, Mt.Pleasant and 

out-stations. Wash. Ter. 
Killip, Robert, Chested Butte, Colo. 
Knight, Horace B., Bremen, Ind. 
Loomis, Eli R., Walla Walla, Wash. Ter. 
Mathews, Robert J., Hamilton, Mo. 
Pearson, Samuel, West Cedar Valley and Orford, 

Neb. 
Read, Eugene B., Montrose, Colo. 
Rod berg, John P., Maple Rapids, Brunswick and 

Mora, Minn. 
Rood, John, Forest Mills, Lake City, Zumbrota 

and Roscoe, Minn. 
Ruddock, Edward N., Villard, Minn, 
s.-m borne, George M., St Louis, Mo. 
Scotford, Henry C, Kansas City, Mo. 
Stone, Sidney, Ada, Minn. 
Taylor, Horace J., Anacortes, Wash. Ter. 
Tuttle, Charles F., Clare, Dover and out-station, 

Mich. 
Walton, Richard C, Highmore, So. Dak. 
Wolfe, Joseph, Whatcom, Wash. Ter. 
Wheeler, William C, Alma, McFarland and vi- 
cinity, Kan. 



gtcceiirts in 2*lavcTt, 1888. 



The following statement includes the amounts paid directly into the Treasury, together with, 
those reported by Auxiliaries, as expended in their fields during the last Missionary year. 
The sums expended by Auxiliaries within their bounds are marked (*). 



MAINE— $318.68. 

Maine Missionary Society *$17,905 08 

Auburn, H. F. B. Root.. 10 00 

Bangor, Interest on the Kittredge 

Fund, by J. L. Crosby, Treas. Maine 

Miss. Soc 150 00 

Brownville, bv Rev. W. H. McBride.. 7 30 

Bucksport, Miss J. H. Homer 23 00 

Hallowell, Miss S. B. Oilman, $10; 

Mrs. S. Page, $10 20 00 

Kennebunkport, Union Ch. and Soc, 

by J. Titcomb 36 23 

Machias, Center Street Ch., by A. L. 

Heaton _ 6 85 

Norridgewock, A Friend. 5 00 
Orono, Cong. Ch., Dea. E. Mansfield, 

by Rev. C. B. Wathen 25 00 

Portland, Friends of the Bethel Ch... 5 00 
Sherman Mills, Wasnbnrn Memorial 

Ch., by I. C. Bumpus _. 5 00 

Somerset Co., A Friend .. 10 00 

Waldoboro, Mrs. H. H. Lovell 10 00 

Union, Mrs. S. L Norcross. 3 80 

Yarmouth, Miss G. H. Young 1 50 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— §6,192.30; of which 
Legacies, $5,400.13. 

New Hampshire Missionary Society. *$11,703 10 



Received by L. D. Stevens, Treas. N. 

H. H. M. Soc: 

Concord, First $4 00 

A Friend 200 00 

Hampstead 18 00 

Hampton 7 00 

Mason, Mrs. P. W. Wilson.. . 4 00 

Peterborough, Union Evan. 
Ch. 40 00 

Temple, Cong. Sunday-school 1134 $284 34 

Alstead, Miss E. Gorhain 5 00 

Bennington, Miss E. Whittemore, by 

T. C. Whittemore 5 00 

Bethlehem, Mrs. B. F. Winch, in full, 

to const, her a L. M., by Rev. N. P. 

Philbrook 10 00 

Campton, Two Friends 5 00 

Center Ossipee, by Rev. N. M. Bailey 20 00 
Concord, First Ch., by the Kev. F. D. 

Ayer, to const. Miss E. A. Folger 

and Mrs. J. C. Ordway L. Ms 100 00 

On account of Legacy of James Mc- 
Queston, by Messrs. Dole and Ste- 
vens, KxV 3.60100 

Chesterfield Factory, O. J. Butterfield 10 00 
Eppiug, F. W. Spaiilding and family 

for Debt . 8 00 

Exeter, Second Cong. Ch., by Miss E. 

A. Chadwick, $14.40 ; special, $10 .. 24 40 



1888. 



THE HOME M1SSWXARY. 



33 



Goffstown, A Friend for the Debt $20 00 

Hampton Falls and Scabrook, Ch., 
$8.1.-)-. Rev. J. Kimball, $10, by W. 

H. Batcholdcr 18 15 

Hanov.r, A Friend 10 00 

Hill, Mrs. H. M. Butler, by Rev. V. 

W. Blackmail 5 00 

Hinsdale, C. \V. Clark, in full, to const. 

('. 1'. Hall a L. M 7 07 

Hillsborough Bridge, by Rev. D. W. 

Goodate 17 25 

Caroline M. Kmmham, to const. 

Rev. A. B. DwiiinbiiL. M 50 00 

Jaffrey, Mrs. (;. A. Phelps 6 2j 

Lisbon, Mary K. Cunnnings 4 00 

Lyme, Legacy of Marinda M. Em- 
mons, by C. F. Kingsbury, Kx 1,799 18 

Manchester, J. W. J . . 20 00 

Mason, Kev. C, F. Crathern, $1 ; Rev. 
David Goodwin, $1 ; Mrs. II. B. Hos- 
mer, $1; Mrs. C. 15. Goodwin, $1; 
Mrs. L. J. Goodwin, $1, by Rev. D. 

Goodwin 5 00 

A Friend _ 5 00 

Mil ford, li. Mansfield, for Debt. 2 00 

New Hampshire, Stratham 5 00 

Newmarket, T. II. Wiswall 10 00 

North Hampton, J. L Philbrook 20 00 

Northwood Center, Ellen E. Wiggin.. 4 DO 

Mrs. E. E. Wiggin.. 2 00 

Pelham, Mrs. E. W. Tyler 10 00 

Piermont, by Rev. W. A. C. Converse 15 00 

Pittsfield, "First," by M. 11. Nutter.. 24 00 

Rindge, A Friend 1 00 

Sanbornton, A Minister's Widow 10 00 

Stratham, "O " 2 00 

Tamworth, Mrs. F. Davis 20 0(3 

Temple, Sunday-school, by C. N. 

Col burn, $8.05; Mrs. G. Goodyear, $3 11 05 

Troy, Trin. Ch. by E. Buttrick 10 11 

VERMONT— $453.14. 
Vermont Domestic Missionary So- 
ciety *$10,284 16 

Barnet, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mary Abbott 1 00 

Berlin, Ladies'Sew. Soc, for Woman's 

Dept., A Birthday Offering, by Mrs. 

H. E. Perrin 4 00 

Chelsea, by Mrs. W. P. Townsend 11 91 

Cornwall, H. Robbing, by Rev. M. C. 

Stebbins 10 00 

Essex, Mrs. M. H. Seaton 5 00 

Middiebury, From the estate of B. 

Preston, dec, by E, C. Severance, 

Ex 30 00 

Rupert, Birthdav offering from " Little 

Cristy," hv Mrs. C. A. Perrv . 1 00 

St. Albans, First Ch., $38; for 

Woman's Dept., $26, by Rev. C. S. 

Smith, Sec. Vt. Dom. Miss. Soc 64 00 

St. Johnsbury, Woman's H. Iff. Soc. of 

the North Ch., by Mrs. W. P. Smith 59 98 

L. D. Hazen, to const. C. D. Hazen 
a L. M 50 00 

Master Joseph Fairbanks, special 1 25 

Sharon, E. K. Baxter... 25 00 

Springfield, Mrs. F. Parks, for the 

Debt, by A. Woolson 50 00 

Stowe, A. Smith _ 20 00 

Swanton, A Mother and Daughter, two 

Mites. 2 00 

Vermont, A Friend 5 00 

Wallintrford, A Friend.... 100 00 

Friends. 3 00 

Woodstock, A Friend 10 00 

MASSACHUSETTS— $19,352.76; of which 
legacies, $4,250.47. 

Massachusetts Home Missionary So- 
ciety *$44,500 09 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas. 

By request of Donors 8,376 99 

of which $7 for Bohemian work, 
and $25 for Children's Bohemian 
Fund. 



For Slavic dept., Oberlin $63 78 

For Work among Foreigners in the 

West 4,500 00 

Dr. Dexter, 50 00 

Agawam, A Lady 2 00 

Amherst, North Cu. 10 00 

Andover, Edward Taylor 20 00 

A Friend 5 00 

Ashhuruhum, A Friend 50 

Ashiicld, S. Williams 3 00 

Bedford, Ladies' Home Miss. Soc, by 

Mrs. W.G.Webber 25 00 

Dea. J. P. George... 2 00 

Berk lev, A few Friends, by A. E. 

Dean.. 50 00 

Beverly, On account of Legacy of J. 

Lovett, by C. T. Lovett, Ex 250 00 

Boston, Woman's Home Miss. Assoc, 
by Miss Sarah K. Burgess, Treas., 

special for Salary Fund 195 00 

Rev. L. Farnham. 10 00 

W. F. Putnam, to const, him a L. M. 100 00 

"A Friend in need " 25 00 

True Friend 1 00 

A Friend 1 00 

Boston Highlands, M. L. S., a Thank- 
offering, $5; Two Mites, $1 6 00 

Brimfiekf, Dea D. Brown _ 5 00 

Cambridge, M. C 20 00 

Cambridge, "Sick Subscriber," 

special ._ 25 00 

Campello, S. H. Foss 5 00 

Clinton, C. L. Swan 100 00 

Dalton, by H. A. Barton, Jr., to const. 

Mrs. Z. Crane, Jr., a L. M 9G 50 

Danvers, Legacy of Mrs. C. H. Gould, 

by C. H. Gould, Ex. 500 00 

Dea. E Peabody's Sunday-school 

class in Maple Street Ch 16 00 

Danvers Center, C. A. Keif e 140 

Dedham, First Ch., extra, by C. 

Guild.. 75 00 

First Ch., add'l., by C. Guild 30 00 

Easthampton, Payson Ch. Sunday- 
school, by D. M. Lyman, to const. 
Miss L. A. Ferry a L. M., for the 

Children's Bohemian Fund 50 00 

East Charlemont, on account of 
legacy of David Smith, $1,094.90; 
and of Levi Smith, $2,405.57 ; by 

Josiah Trow, Ex 3,500 47 

Enfield, Estate of J. B. Woods, by 

Rev. K. M. Woods 50 00 

Framingham, A Friend. _ 25 00 

Georgetown, Memorial Ch., by L. P. 

Palmer 53 80 

Gilbertville, Young People's Mission 
Circle, by F. Humphrey, Treas., 

special 25 00 

Two Friends, for Debt 2 00 

Globe Village, Evan. Free Ch. Soc, 

by A. L. Hyde... 56 56 

Greenfield, Second Cong. Sundav- 

school, by K. T. Slate.... 25 00 

Rev. A. G. Loomis.. 12 00 

Greenwich, H. M. Woods, by C. F. 

Woods 20 00 

Hadley, First Cong. Sunday-school, 
for Sunday-school work, bv J. W. 

Marsh 1100 

Hatfield, by Rev. R. McE. Woods.... 24 56 

Jamaica Plain, C. T.Bauer 25 00 

Lancaster, Evan. Sunday-school, by 

Ellen Wasgatt 16 78 

Lawrence, Trinity Ch., by A. T. 

Woods 49 78 

T. C. Whittemore... 5 00 

Lincoln, A Friend of the West 2 00 

Lowell, Pawtucket Falls, E. M. H.... 20 00 

Marion, S. D. Hadlev 10 00 

Marlboro, Lillian M.'Goodale... 1 00 

A Friend. 5 00 

Milton, M E. V 3 00 

Mrs. e. D. Wadsworth 5 00 

Mittineague, Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
the Cong Ch., by Mrs. S. C. De- 
mond 50 00 



34 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



Y. P. S. C. E., by L. E. Smith, 

special $a5 00 

Newburyport, Miss A. P. Bassett 4 40 
North Amherst, Mrs. E. E. Fisher, by 

Rev. G. E. Fisher 5 00 

North Andover, Ladies' Miss. Assoc, 

by J. S. Sanborn, to const. Mrs. E. 

Wooley a L. M 50 00 

North Chelmsford, Second Cone. Ch., 

by A. II. Sheldon, to const. Mrs. G. 

Hyde a L. M., $52; Mr. J. H. and 

Mrs. J. A. Clark, $50, to const. Mrs. 

H. D. Clark a L. M 102 00 

Norton, Trin. Ch., by Rev. J. P. Lane. 51 00 

AFriend 10 00 

Palmer, Second, by Chas. Marsh. 100 00 

Pittsfield, Mrs. M. S. B. Todd, to 

const. Martha C. T. Hill and Anna D. 

Paddock L. Ms 100 00 

Plymouth Co., A Friend 2 00 

Quincy, J. H. Wheble 2 00 

Rehoboth, by F. A. Bliss 25 00 

Sandwich. MissM. A. Gregory 5 00 

Sheffield, by H. Dutcher 10 09 

Shelburne Falls, A. N. Russell, $2.50; 

H. A. Russell, $2.50 5 00 

Sixteen Acres, V. H. Pease and family, 

$5; a few Friends, $1 6 00 

Southboro, L. S. Newton 40 

South Hadley Falls, John Gaylord 15 00 

Spencer, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Powers. 1 00 

Springfield, Dr. D. F. Atwater 20 00 

H. Cooley 15 00 

E. W 5 00 

Stockbridge,A Friend 5 00 

Ware, Ladies' H. M. Soc. of the East 

Cong. Ch., by Mrs. H. O. Draper, to 

const. Mrs. A. T. Perry a L. M 50 00 

Watertown, Lady Friend 5 00 

Wellesley, Miss M. A. Stevens 10 00 

A Friend. 10 00 

West Boylston, C. T.White 2 40 

West Newton, J. C. King, for the 

Debt 1 00 

Worcester, Salem Street Ch., by E 

Tucker, Jr 41 75 

Collected by Three Young Ladies, 

by Mary R. Green, special 7 60 

Mrs. H. M. Smith 5 00 

Friends, a Thank-offering 2 00 

AFriend 20 00 

RHODE ISLAND— $1,184.17. 

Rhode Island Home Miss. Soc. +$3,496 27 

Received by E. Barrows, Treas. 
R. I. H. M. Soc. : 

Central Falls Ch $65 50 

Providence. Central Ch 440 00 

Beneficent Ch 125 00 

630 50 

Bristol, First Ch. Ladies' Soc. by M. 

A. Watson 20 00 

Little Compton, United Cong. Ch. 
Woman's Dept.,by A. H. Simmons 2 00 

Pawtucket, by E. R. Bullock 150 00 

Providence, Ladies' H. M. Soc. $300 ; 
Friends in Union Ch.,by Rev. J. H. 

Mcllvaine, D. D, $15 315 00 

AFriend, by E. Knight 1 00 

Rev. R. W. Williams 15 00 

E. G. Hopkins 100 

El wood Ch., by H. T. Root 29 67 

H. G. Thresher, for Debt 20 00 

CONNECTICUT— $12,175.66; of which 

Legacy, $303.67. 
Missionary Society of Connecticut.. *$15,988 89 
Miss. Soc. of Conn.. W. W. Jacobs, 

Treas., by Rev. W. H. Moore, Sec. 669 08 
Received by Mrs. S. M. 

Hotchkiss, Treas. Womans H. 

M. Union: 

Bridgeport, Ladies' 
H.M. Soc. First Ch $75.00 



Pomfret Center, Ladies' H. M. 
Soc. for Debt, by MiBsC. M. 
Adams $15 00 

90 00 
Toward fund for horse for Rev. 

E. Richards: 
Canton Center, Mrs. W. G. 

Halleck and sister ...$2 00 

Hartford, First, Ladies' H. M. 

Soc. by Miss E. Bunce 21 50 

Ladies' Soc. Pearl St. Ch 5 00 

Norwich, Sunday-school, 
Broadway Ch., and Friends 15 00 
Helping Hand Soc, Broad- 
way Ch. 5 00 

Buckingham Chapel Sun- 
day-school, by Mrs. E. C. 

Hinckley 5 00 

Stonineton, First Ch., by 

Miss^E. A. Smith 10 00 

$153 50 

Bethlehem, A Friend 5 00 

Bristol, by K. Peck 107 37 

S. E. Root, to const. Mrs. John Birge 

aL. M. 100 00 

Bridgeport, for Debt, Mrs. A. M. 

Doten 3 00 

Brooklyn, First Trin. Ch., by M. W. 
Crosby, to const. C. S. Woodbridge 

a L. M. 5000 

Friends _ 15 00 

Chaplin, A Thank-offering 2 00 

Cheshire, by A. C. Peck 27 44 

A Friend 30 00 

Colebrook, Mrs. C. C. Dustin 3 00 

Columbia, Cong. Sunday-school, by J. 

Hutchins 24 00 

Connecticut. AFriend 500 00 

Connecticut, N. N. D 5 00 

Connecticut, A Friend, An Easter Gift 30 00 
Cromwell, Ch. in part, by Rev. H. G. 

Marshall 27 00 

Durham, S., A Thank-offering 5 00 

East Avon, by Rev. N. J. Seeley 13 00 

East Haddam, Mrs. E. Smith 2 00 

East Hartford, First Cong. Sunday- 
school, byD. L. Williams 32 89 

East Windsor, Mrs. S. L. Wells 5 00 

Ellsworth, by Rev. J. H. Milller 9 75 

Enfield, S. E. Reynolds 500 00 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Leete, to 
const. Miss E. A. Scranton a L. M. 50 00 
Hadlyme, $4; R. E. Hungerford, $5 9 00 

Hartford, " Gladly given back" 2 00 

N. Case 100 00 

Mrs. M. C. Bemie, special 10 00 

Higganum, by R. J. Gladwin 23 00 

Kensington, by A. J. Benedict 25 00 

Lyme, "A Widow's Mite" 1 00 

Middletown, First Ch., Mr. and Mrs. T. 
G. Mather, by Rev. A. W. Hazen.. 1,000 00 

W. M. Dean 5 00 

Millington, Ch., $1; East Haddam, A 
Friend, $4, by Rev. G. L. Edwards.. 5 00 

Monroe, Friends of the Cause 20 00 

North Branford, Mrs. N. W. Pease.... 25 00 
New Britain, South Ch., Sunday- 
school, by E. H. Caee 24 02 

New Haven, J. L. Ensign 10 00 

College Street Ch. , Mrs. M. H. Town- 
send 25 00 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Rice 15 00 

AFriend 4 00 

Northfield, Ch., $53.19; A Thank-offer- 
ing from a Friend, $25, by L. S. 

Wooster 78 19 

North Haven, Mrs. E. A. B 10 00 

New London, Miss Lockwood, by Mrs. 

B. P. McEwen, special 10 00 

Norwich, Mrs. E. G. Thompson 25 00 

AFriend 10 00 

Park Ch., by H. L. Butts 7,308 24 

AFriend 1 40 

North Stonington, Two Friends 15 00 



1SSS. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



35 



Plainville, Mrs. H. D. Stanley $5 00 

Pomfret, Rev. C. P. Grosvenor 1 00 

Rockville, Second, by E. E. Chap- 
man... 500 00 

Baybrook, Lucy B. Ward. 30 00 

Scotland, by He v. G. A. Brran 33 80 

South Windham, Miss E. E. Talbot 1 00 

Btonlngton, A Friend 5 00 

A Friend 15 00 

Suttield, James P., Willis A., Lillian, 
and Charley Pierce, for Children's 

Bohemian Fand 1 00 

Terryville, by O. M. Allen 73 00 

Walfingf ord, Miss J. Beadle 40 

West Haven, Mrs E. Smith 10 00 

Mrs. B. C.Kimball 5 00 

Windham, by W. S. Clark 51 91 

Windsor, Cash 5 00 

Windsor Locks, A Friend 5 00 

Woodbury, Miss 10. Wheelock. 2 00 

Legacy of Sarah J. Iteming, by A. 

A. Hoot, Adm 303 07 

NEW YORK— $5,764,83. 

Received by Rev. C. C. Creegan, 
D. D 

Copenhagen __.$37 50 

Deer River 6 00 

43 50 

Received hy Mrs. L. H. Cobb, 

Treas. Woman's H. M. Union: 

Angola, Woman's Aux 14 00 

Brooklyn, 11. S. C 432 25 

Canastota, Mrs. W. W. War- 
ner 1 00 

Hammondsville, Ladies' Aux. 10 00 

Homer, Mrs. C. Hitchcock .5 00 

Ironville, Ladies' Aux 6 50 

New York City, Sunday-school 
of Pilgrim Ch. for Children's 

Bohemian Fund 15 00 

Perry Center, Ladies' Benev. 

Soc. special 25 00 

Riverhead, Women's H. M. 

Soc 29 00 

Shelburne, Ladies' Aux. to 
const. Minnie C. Coats aL. 

M 71 00 

Sydney, Ladies' Aux 6 00 

604 75 

Received by Rev. V. D. Garret- 
son: 

Albany 17 60 

North Lawrence 42 00 

Schenectady 50 00 

Stockholm 11 44 

Watertown 33 35 

144 39 

Albany, Miss M. Learned 50 00 

A Friend 30 00 

Antwerp, First Ch., by A. Hoyt. 58 50 

Binghamton, Elizabeth Van 
Valkenburg, by J. Van Valk- 

enburg 3 00 

Berkshire, A Friend 10 00 

Brooklyn, Plymouth Ch., by S. V. 

White 1,613 30 

South Cong. Ch.,by E. D. Ford 103 83 

H. S. C, special, $166.30; B. D. Bene- 
dict, $25; Annie Z. Cobb, $1; Mrs. 
Martin H. Day, $1; A Lady Friend, 

$1 194 00 

Canaan Four Corners, Mrs. A. Barstow 5 00 

Chippewa Bay, E. L. Higbee 1 00 

Coney Island, by Rev. E. O. Tade 2 00 

Eldred,by Rev. H. P. Hamilton 5 00 

Far Rockaway, Mrs. P. S. Harris 1 40 

Flushing, R. B. Parsons 26 50 

Griffin's Mills, by Rev. M. B. Dodge.. 1 38 

Hamilton, Friends in Cong, Ch. by O. 

S.Campbell 9 00 

ByO. S. Campbell 5 00 

Homer, by S. C.Webb 38 25 

Hoosick Falls, A Friend 5 00 

Jamestown, First, by Rev. E. C. Hall 33 40 
Jordanville, Nrs, C."F.W 10 00 



Lewi6 and Wadham's Mills, by Rev. A. 
R.Crawford $9 75 

Little Valley, by Mrs. W. C. Parker.. 10 00 

New Lebanon, by J. Kendall 30 20 

New York City, Broadway Tabernacle 
Ch., in part, bv I. K. Fisher, Treas. 
$958.74: ('. N. Bliss $250; Dr. A. H. C. 
and Wife, $300; E.F. Browning, $100; 
II. Dunham. $100; F. F. Thompson, 
$100; A. 0. Armstrong, $35: R. Mc- 
Namee, $35; Mrs. J. McKenzie, $35; 
S. F. Stanton, $35; C. B. Knevals, 
$35; P. V. Van Valkenburgh, $35; G. 
Richards, $35; Mrs. Maghee, $15; 

E. West, $10; S. M. Knevals, $10; 

F. A. Snow, $10; Mrs. E. B. Hopkins, 

$5; A Little Girl, $13 1,995 74 

Pilgrim Ch. by H. N. Lockwood, to 
const. Mrs. C. T. Sutton and 
others L. Ms 345 02 

Union Theol. Sem. Soc. of Inquiry, 
by R. E. Farrier 15 00 

Mrs. J. M. Fiske, $25: S. A. W. $15; 
one of the "King's Daughters," $10 50 00 
North Java, by Rev. J. H. Mallows, 2 25 
North Lawrence, Mrs. Nancy Wil- 
liams, a Birthday offering 5 00 

Oneonta, A Thank - offering, L. J. 

Safford 5 00 

Oriskany Falls, Rev. A. S. Worden... 7 50 

Otsego, Ch., $7 05; Women's H. M. 

Union, $13.50; by Rev. J. R.Chaplin 30 55 

Patchogtie, First, by F.Hammond.. 17 00 

J. S. Havens. 5 00 

Poughkeepsie, Anne S. Banfteld 24 40 

Rochester, Plymouth Ch., M. Adams, 

by Rev. M Adams 5 00 

Sayville, A Friend, for Debt 5 00 

Sherburne, A Friend 5 00 

Summer Hill, by Rev. C. H. Curtis.. 6 77 

Syracuse, Plymouth Ch.,by H.C. Hem- 

mingway 165 83 

Union Falls, F. E. Duncan 10 00 

Wading River, by Rev. W. H. Seely.. 15 00 

Walton, First, by G. W. Fitch 150 00 

Wilmington, by Rev. D. Fish 2 42 

NEW JERSEY— $605.43. 

Arlington, J. B. Peck 10 00 

Chatham, by Rev. R. S. Stone 5 00 

Chester, by Rev. G. W. Plack 12 36 

East Orange, Trinity Ch., by R. D. 

Weeks 400 00 

Westrield,by J. R. Connoly 178 07 

PENNSYLVANIA-$78.42. 

Ashland, by Rev. E. T. Griffith 15 00 

Cambridge, First Ch., by A B. Ross. 5 00 

Cambridgeboro, Mrs. S. E. McFadden 1 00 
Edwardsdale, Welsh Ch., $10 ; Miss J. 

Dare, $1 ; by W. L. Roberts 11 00 

Neath, by W. S. Davis 5 10 

Pittsburgh, Cong. Ch., South Side, by 

Rev. D. M. George 13 00 

Riceville, by Rev. A. B. Sherk 1 32 

Sharon, by Rev. G. Henshaw 20 00 

Slatington, by Rev. W. H. Jones 5 00 

West Bangor, by Rev. J. Cadwalader 2 00 

MARYLAND-$7.00. 

Frostburg, Ch., $5 ; D. Harris, $1, by 

E. H. B. Richards 6 00 

F. Rees 1 00 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $270.00. 

Washington, First, $170; Dr»Patton, 

$30, by S. H. Galpin 200 00 

Mt. Pleasant Cong. Ch., by C. B. 
Chatfield 70 00 

ALABAMA— $88.55. 
Mobile, S. R. Merriwether, $2 ; J. J. 

Jackson, $1.50 3 50 

Shelby, by E. D. Upham 85 05 



36 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



NORTH CAROLINA— $3 00. 

Southern Pines, Union Sunday-school, 

by Carrie E. Wiggin $3 00 

ARKANSAS— $30.96. 

Arkansas, D 3 50 

Little Rock, by Rev. R. H. Read 9 46 

Rogers, by fiev. J. G. Bailey 18 00 

FLORIDA— $149.95. 

Glencoe, Mrs. D. L. Coe, $5; W. A. 

Coe$5 10 00 

Melbourne, by Rev. A. B. Dilley_ 10 00 

Mt. Dora, by Rev. J. II. Jenkins.... 8 21 
Norwalk and Kerr City, by Rev. B. T. 

Stafford 2 50 

Sanford, Mrs. M. Lyman _ 10 00 

Tampa, by F. J P. Maefarland 30 55 

Winter Park, Women's II. M. Soc.,by 

Mrs. L. C. Partridge 5 00 

By T. W. Lvman 03 69 

Dr. S. H. Bassinger.... 10 00 

TEXAS— $34.00. 

Palestine, bv Rev. E. F. Fales 25 00 

Sherman, by Rev. R. A. Wheelock.. 9 00 

INDIAN TERRITORY— $15.55. 
McAllister, by Rev. J. H. Van Dyne. 10 00 

Vinita, Prof. J. McCarthy 5 5 

NEW MEXICO— $6.00. 

Deming, by Rev. C. L. Diven 6 00 

ARIZONA— $52.38. 

Benson, by Rev. R. T. Liston 52 38 

OHIO— $1,242.94. 

Received in Feb. by S. P. Churchill, 
Treas. Bohemian Board, Cleveland : 

Brooklyn Village $19 38 

Kirtland, Sunday-school 5 00 

Lorain 10 00 

Madison, Central Sunday- 
school. 20 00 

Medina, Sunday-school 15 45 

North Amherst, Sunday- 
school ._ 8 00 

West Williamsfield, Sun- 
day-school __ 6 31 

Spring Creek, Penn., Sun- 
day-school 1 00 

West Spring Creek, Penn., 

Sunday-school... 1 00 

86 14 

Received by Phebe A. 
Cralts, Treas. Ohio Wo- 
man's H. M. Union : 
Burton, Mrs. A. S. Hotch- 

kiss $3 00 

Columbus, Emma and 

Walter Mahony _ 97 

York, L. M. 8oc 10 00 

13 97 

Ashtabula, Sunday-school, SecondCh., 
$11.38; for Children's Bohemian 
Fund, $7.73 ; by Rev. G. B. Davi- 
son 19 11 

Belden, by Rev E. A. Hoffman 18 75 

Brighton, by O. F.Gogs 2 60 

Brdokfield, Welsh Oh., by J. L. 

Thomas 8 00 

Cincinnati, Young People's Miss. Soc. 
of the Central Ch., by Mrs. C. Mein- 

inger, Jr _, 35 00 

Columbus, First, by F. C. Sessions.. 450 00 
First Cong. Sunday-school, by J. W. 

Estill. 100 00 

Rev. B. Talbot 1 00 

Cornerville, by A. D. Follett 2 00 

Cortland, Sunday-school, by Rev. G. 

C. Jewell 1 58 

Cow Run, $3.50 ; Marietta, $3 ; Moss 
Run, $5, by Rev. R. G. Beynon.... 11 50 



CrotbT), Mrs. A. C. Durfey, $5; Mrs. 

H. F. Clark, $1.50 $6 50 

Harniar, bv D. Putnam 135 35 

Hartford, $9.17 ; Cortland, $6, by Rev. 

J. C. Jewell _ 15 17 

Lodi, Ladies' Miss. Soc, for Debt 4 00 

Marietta, by A. D. Follett.... 110 88 

Mt. Vernon, bv P. B. Chase . 50 00 

Norwalk, T. H,... 2 00 

Oberlin, First, bv H. G. Husted .. 126 39 

Prof. E. P. Barrows.... 10 00 

A Friend .. 20 00 

Penfield, bv Rev. J. C. Hughes;.. 3 00 
Plain City, Rev. C. S. Irwin, for 

ground-hog skin 3 00 

Tontogany^J, Whitehead. 6 00 

Wellington, C. F. West 100 



INDIANA— $358.45. 

Received bv Rev. E. D. Curtis: 

East Gilead $1 65 

Elkhart 50 00 

Indianapolis, Mayflower Ch. 

W. 11. M. U. special 28 67 

Plymouth Ch., Ladies 1 

Union 25 00 

Kokomo, Ladies' II. M. W... 14 6/ 

Macksville, Bethany Ch 3 00 

Received by Rev. Charles Evans: 
Brazil, C. T. Andrews, $5; 
Major Collins, $5; Rev. C. 
Evans, $5; Mrs. U. K. An- 
drews, $1; Miss L. C. An- 
drews 25c. , Miss C. Andrews 
25c, Mrs. W. S. Smith, 50c, 

Mrs. C. Jones, $1. $18 00 

Cardonia.... 2 70 



122 99 



20 70 

Indianapolis, Mayflower Ch., 
by Rev. N A. Hyde, D. D___. 30 51 
Plymouth Ch., by Rev. O. C. 

McCulloch 31 00 

Terre Haute, Ch., $120.38; 
Woman's H. M. Soc, $32.87, 
by C. B. Brokaw 153 25 

ILLINOIS— $351.36. 

Illinois Home Missionary Soc *$16,685 55 

Illinois Home Miss. Soc. by 

Rev. J. B. Tompkins, Sec... $150 00 
Woman's Home Miss. LTnion 

of Illinois by Mrs. B. F. 

Leavitt, Treas.: 

Chicago,Leavitt Street Ch p 86 

Rockford, Woman's H. M. 

Union, Second Ch 10 50 

13 36 

Beecher, Mrs. A. H. Perry 5 00 

Byron, T. H. Read. 2 00 

Freeport, W. Bruce 10 00 

Geneseo, Mrs. P.Huntington 10 00 

Mrs. E. L. Atkinson 5 00 

Payson, J. K. Scarborough. 100 00 

Princeton, A Friend, for Debt 25 00 

Sycamore, Mrs. E. Wood 5 00 

Toulon, Mrs. J. C. Starrett 25 00 

Western Springs, Lovella Sillence.. 1 00 

MISSOURI— $1,330.93. 

Received by Rev. F. B. Doe: 
Bevier, by Rev. C. J. Sage.... $31 41 

Lathrop 2 00 

Nichols 7 70 

St. Louis, Compton Hill Ch.. 20 50 

Olive Branch Ch. 2 00 

Webster Groves 219 00 



Received by Mrs. A. E. Cook, Treas. 

Billings, L. H. M. S $1 00 

Carthage, L. H. M. S. of Cong. 

Ch. 18 00 

Kansas City, L. H. M. S. of 

Olivet Ch 5 00 



$282 61 



isss. 



the home missionary. 



37 



Kidder, From Mite Boxes, 
Three S ouugest classes in 

Sunday-school.. $5 80 

Lebanon, L. II. M. S. of ( long 

Ch 10 00 

Neosho, L. H. M. 6 of Cong. 

Ch.... .. 5 00 

Ozark, L. II. M. s. Riverdale 

Ch - 1 00 

St. Louis, L. II. M. S. of 

FirstCh. - 16 60 

L. II. M s of Pilgrim Ch._ 77 50 
Verdella, Ladies H. M. S. of 

Pilgrim Ch.. 1 00 

Webster Groves, L. II. M. S. 27 00 

— $167 90 

Hamilton, by Rev. G. T. Hol- 

Combe 17 29 

Kansas City, First Ch., by J. F. 

Downing 246 00 

La Grange, by Rev. J. Reuth 5 00 
Mine La Motto, by Rev. J. B. 

Johnston . 9 00 

Pierce City. Cheerful Workers, 
Mission Baud, First ch., by 

Mrs. II. c. Shoemaker... 6 00 

Ritchey, by Bev. c. Combs. 2 15 

Romance,'Z. J. Feemster 10 00 

St. Louis, Pilgrim Ch., by G. L. 

Day 331 00 

Hon. W. Currier 100 00 

Sedalia, by W. H. Van Warner 110 05 

Springfield, by A. R. Sprague. 40 08 

Windsor, by Rev. F. W. Hullinger.. 3 25 

MICHIGAN^ $3,793. 81. 

Received by Rev. L. Warren. 

Alamo, Dea. Julius Ilackley.. 20 00 

Armada, Sunday-school 15 00 

Alpine and Walker ._ 20 00 

Barry and Johnstown _ 7 65 

Bedford 15 25 

Clinton, add'l... 5 00 

Cooper, Young Ladies 1 Soc. 15 00 

Covert, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Delta 9 00 

Dexter 18 00 

East Tawas 3 25 

East Gilead, Rev. L. Curtiss. 3 00 

Frankfort 4 75 

Gfalesburgh, A Friend 50 00 

Gavlord 10 10 

Grand Rapids, First 200 00 

Irving 4 30 

Jerome 3 50 

Lansing, Ch. 179 23 

Lerov 27 15 

Leslie 13 89 

Lowell 27 50 

Manistee, A. H. Lv:nan 5 00 

Manistee '. 30 00 

Muskegon, Ch., add'l... 3 59 

Nashville, "Contributor"... 5 00 

Owosso 18 54 

Portland 46 33 

Reed City. 25 00 

Sand-tone. 17 05 

Shelby 6 00 

Tawas City 2 40 

Verm on tvi lie, Sunday-school 

and Individuals 11 00 

Waeousta 13 00 

West Adrian _ 30 00 

$934 50 

Received by Mrs. B. F. Grabill, 
Treas. Woman's II. M. Union: 

Alba. $9 00 

Alamo, Pledge cards... 7 50 

Allegan, in full, to const. 

Mrs. Sarah Tvler a L. M. . . 38 00 
Allendale, W. H. and F. 

M. S._. . 6 00 

Alpena 11 80 

Ann Arbor, General fund 

$11.50; special $5. 16 50 



Athens, Women of the Ch.... $8 00 

Chesterfield, Mite Boxes 1 80 

Coloma 5 00 

Detroit, W. M. 8. Port w ayne 

Ch., $5; Helping Hand Soc., 

$1. 6 00 

Dexter 7 00 

DowagVkc 10 00 

Farwoll , 3 00 

Flint. Y. P. M. S. 20 00 

Prankftrrf 5 00 

Galesburg, W. IF and F. M. 
s. Mite Boxes. $t8J95; Bea- 
con Fund, Sl.05 20 Oj 

Grand Rapids, W. H. M. 8. 

Park Cong, Ch. 50 00 

Penny collection 1ml. Cong. 

Ch __ 6 62 

Grandville, Women of the 

Ch. 5 00 

Greenville, General fund, 
$14.20: Hunter Horse Fund 
10c: Young People's ( 'hris- 
tian Society, sio: .Mrs. R. S. 

Ellsworth, $5 29 30 

W. H. M. S. of Woodward 
Avenue Ch., to const. Mrs. 
B. M. Wilcox a L. M..__. 75 00 

Hancock 35 00 

Hartford.. 3 20 

Lake Linden 10 70 

Litchfield, special 12 £0 

Lowell 31 00 

Muskegon. .Mrs. R. S. Thomp- 
son, for Salary Fund 10 00 

New Baltimore 5 00 

North Adams 10 00 

Perry, $9; Children's Mission 

Band, $3. 12 00 

Portland, Fanny WadsworthS. 5 00 

St. Johns 4 00 

St. Joseph _ 11 00 

Sand Beach, Mrs. C. L. Nims. 10 00 

Shelby 5 00 

Stanton 13 50 

Three Oaks 6 00 

Vernon 10 46 

Vicksburg, W. H. M. S., $12; 

Busy Bees M. S.,$2 14 00 

West "Adrian, L. M. S 10 00 

Ypsilanti 5 00 

North Star Mission : 
Litchfield, Sunday- 
school $5 80 

Ludington, Sunday- 
school 5 00 

Maple Rapids,Sunday- 

school 1 80 

Napoleon, Sunday- 

-eliool.. 3 80 

Portland, Mrs. White's 

Sunday-school class 1 00 

Romttb, Juveniles of 
the Sunday-school.. 2 30 

Salem, Sunday-school 5 00 

Stanton. Sunday- 
school 12 60 

Ypsilanti, Sunday- 
school 3 50 

3 00 

43 SO 



Bv Mrs. E. F. Grabill, add'l. 

Bangor $4 00 

Benzonia, Pledges of W. M. S. 5 96 

Carson Citv 7 00 

Covert, L. M. S. $10.13: Chil- 
dren's Mission M. S.,$1.97._ 12 10 
Detroit, Ladies' Union, Second 

Ch.. 50 00 

Duncan City 3 00 

Dundee '. 5 00 

Edmore, Ladies 6 00 

Galesburg, Y. L. M. S 10 00 

Grand Blanc, $17.67; for Bea- 
con Fund, $1.05 18 72 



$610 38 



38 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



Grand Rapide, W. M. S.. Sec- 
ond Ch $5 30 

Highland Station 5 00 

Hubbardston 7 65 

Kalkaska, $2.55; Willing 

Workers, $2 4 55 

Laingsburgh 3 50 

Lansing 10 00 

Owosso,iIome Miss. Band, $5; 

Mite Boxes, $5.52 10 52 

Somerset 9 32 

North Star Mission: 
Augusta, Sunday- 

school $7 50 

Bedford, Collection.. 10 00 
Carson City, Sunday- 
school 3 00 

East Saginaw, Sunday- 
school 32 00 

Grand Blanc, Sunday- 
school 31 00 

Kalkaska, Sunday- 
school 3 00 

Lansing, Mrs. Leete's 
Sunday-school class 

of boys 3 95 

Mason C'itv, Iowa, Mrs. 

Abby Blancb.ard.-_ 100 
Michigan Center, Mrs. 
Stewart's Sunday- 
school class of boys 1 30 
New York City, Rev. 

A. H. Clapp 5 00 

Potterville, Sunday- 
school 1 80 

Richmond, Mrs. Seth 

Lathrop 1 00 

St Joseph, Sunday- 
school of Second Ch. 5 10 

105 65 $283 27 

Collections reported for Salary Fund: 

Hopkins Station $4 00 

Muskegon 15 00 

Nashville 21 50 

St. Louis - 4 00 



Received by Rev. C. F. Van 
Auken: 

Essexville $3 ,2 

Hudson 43 00 

Ithaca 20 58 

North Star 2 25 

Somerset 21 44 



45 50 



90 39 



Received by Rev. F. W. Bush, 
for " Sugar Island Pony:" 
Detour, Dr. W. B. House and 

others $9 50 

East Tawas, Rev. W. C. Allen 

and others 4 25 

Edmore 9 10 

Flint ,Mrs. Holman, Mrs. Lov- 

ell and others 8 15 

Highland Station, Rev. G. E. 

Lincoln 100 

Kalamo 2 29 

Laingsburgh, Mission Band .. 5 00 

Lawrence 3 00 

Perry, Mission Band of 

Friends. 7 00 

St. Ignace, F. G. Truscott 

and others 7 00 

Salem, Second Ch 5 44 

Saugatuck 20 00 

Victor, Sunday-school _ 4 66 

Ada and East Paris, by Rev. W. P.Wil- 
cox - 

Allegan, I. B. Bailey 

Athens, O. N. Hunt 

Augusta, by Rev. J. D. Shults... 

Baldwin, by Rev. R. Vivian 

Bancroft, add'l, by Rev. A. T. Water- 
man 



86 39 

23 00 
5 00 
20 00 
14 36 
1 25 

4 00 



Sunday-school of Cong. Ch. by G. 

Kirker 

Banks, $25.38; Eastport, $3.94, by 

Rev. P. F. McClelland 

Bay Mills and Superior, by Rev I. B. 

Lillie 

Bellaire, $11.50; Central Lake, ?5c, 

and Clam Lake, $5.00. by Rev. H. A. 

Kerns 

Bellaire and Central Lake, by Rev. H. 

A. Kerns 

Breckenridge, $9.15; St. Louis, $1, by 

Rev. W. Woodniansee 

Bridgeport, by Rev. A. A. Wall... 

Bridgman, by Rev. J.J. Bunnell 

Calumet, A. Friend 

Chase, $15.55; Rev. J. Nicol, $5, by 

Rev. J. Nicol _ 

Chesaning, by Rev. W. H.Millar 

Chippewa Lake, by Rev. J. B. 

Roberts _ 

uiare, by Rev. C. F. Tuttle 

Clio, $26.25; Genesee Ch., $13.75, by 

Rev. F. C. Wood 

Coloma, by Rev. W. B. Dada 

Columbus, by Rev. W.I. Hunt 

Coral, by Rev. L. P. Spelman 

Detroit, Woodward Cong. Ch., by F. 

D. Taylor, to const. S. N. Peck, C. 

C. Miller, M. D.,T. A. Hubel; E. H. 

Crowell and Mrs. R. Gilmore L. 

Ms 

Fort Wayne, Cong. Ch. by J. R. 

Wal ker 

Dundee, by Rev. C. W. Carrick 

East Lake, by Rev. H. C. Hurlbut 

Edmore, by Rev. H. Marsh 

Farwell, by Rev. T. A. Porter _ 

Fruitport and Nunica, by Rev. J. H. 

Dole 

Grand Haven, by Rev. R. Lewis 

Grandville, by Rev. G. Benford 

Greenville,T. L. Stevens, by E. F. Gra- 

bill 

Hancock, by Rev. G. F. Waters, in 

full, to const. J. Ross and S. String- 
er L. Ms 

Hart, by Rev. J. E. Smith 

Hartford, $10.90; Lawrence, $11.25, by 

Rev. S. Taylor 

Hopkins, Sunday-school of Second 

Ch.,byRev. W. De Puy 

Hudsonville, by Rev. I. B. Jones 

Ithaca, by Rev. A. H. Norris 

Jackson, First, by W. C. Lewis 

Kalkaska, $3.75; Excelsior, $2, by 

Rev. W. Sidebotham 

Laingsburgh, by J. V. D. Wyckoff 

Lake Linden, E. Henwood _ 

A Friend 

Mancelona and Westwood, by Rev. B. 

J. Baxter ._ 

Nashville, $21.50;Woman's Miss. Soc, 

$15.37, by Rev. F. Hurd — 

Northport, $5; Omena, $10; Leland, 

$7.12, by Rev. C. D. Banister _ 

Olivet, by G. W. Keyes... 

Onekama, by Rev. C. H. Tickner 

Onondaga Jjy Rev. P. M. Crips 

Orion, by Rev. A. C. Webster. 

Oxford, by Rev. J. A. Wells 

Pentwater, by Rev. L. F. Waldo 

Perry, by Rev. O. C. Bailey 

Rockford, by Rev. W. W. De Geer 

Romeo, W. Loud _ 

St. Ignace, by Rev. C. E. Taggart 

St. Joseph, by Rev. J. V. Hickmott.. 

Salem, First Ch., by M. B. Gelston 

Saranac, by Rev. M. C. Dixon _ 

Sault Ste. Marie, Rev. J. C. Van Auken 

and others for Miss'y horse _ 

Sherman, Cleon audMarilla, by Rev. 

R. Redeoff 

Sugar Island, by Rev. J. McGregor 

Tawas City, Mrs. M. A. Kelly 

Vermontville, P'irst, by Mrs. M. Bale.. 

Mrs. W. N.Benedict 



2 00 

29 32 

260 

16 75 



10 15 

11 00 
10 00 

5 00 


20 55 
5 00 


12 31 
10 00 


40 00 
22 60 
25 51 
25 34 



276 04 

6 50 
6 25 
6 00 
17 26 
10 00 

2 00 

42 91 

2 64 

20 00 



98 00 
36 65 

22 15 

10 00 

6 82 
15 00 

271 83 

5 75 

7 50 
20 00 
25 00 

11 65 

36 87 

22 12 
80 00 
15 26 

6 00 
90 00 

5 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 
10 00 
27 95 
18 00 
22 00 
15 00 

115 00 

22 50 

6 50 
1 00 

42 55 
5 00 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



39 



WISCONSIN-$75.40. 

Wisconsin Home Missionary Soc *$11, 249 95 

Baldwin's Mills, C'h., by H. S. Bald- 
win 15 00 

Burlington, Clara Kantsky., 10 00 

Kenosha, by Miss E. L. Stanbridge.. 15 00 

Menonionee Falls, T. Lewis 5 00 

Pewaukee,S. Ilenimings 5 00 

Washburn, by Rev. G. A. Hood 20 40 

Waukesha, S.H 5 00 

IOWA— $232.85. 

Iowa Home Missionary Society *$12,265 99 

Alden, L. Burnham 5 00 

Ames, Mrs. Kate Ray 5 00 

Cherokee, A Friend to const. R. A. 
Lewis, W.J. Coakes, Miss A. Bal- 
lard and Mrs. E. Fobes L. Ms 200 00 

Edgewnod, Mrs. and Mr. N. G. Piatt.. 10 00 

Muscatine, Mrs. E. Kirby 5 00 

Mary Weiman._ 2 60 

Whitten, W. M. Hollister, by Rev. E. 

Adams 5 25 

MINNESOTA— $1,155.06. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley: 
Alexandria, Sunday-school... $10 00 

Brownton, W. M. S 4 25 

Cannon Falls 20 00 

Clearwater, Mary and Willie 
Merrill, $2 ; Rev. G. W. Sar- 

geant,$3 5 00 

Glencoe, Mrs. A. H. Tebbetts. 5 00 
Glyndon, Ch., $11.62; Sundav- 

school, $1.19.. 12 81 

Medford, by D. McKinley 9 00 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 207 97 

Pilgrim 30 73 

George H. Rust, to const. 
Mrs. Josephine V. Rust a 
L. M., $100: Thomas Hale 
Williams, $15; In Memo- 

riam, $10 125 00 

Rochester, Sunday-school 4 10 

B. D. Toan 100 

St. Paul, special 12 50 



447 36 
Minn. Woman's H. M. Soc, Mrs. 
J. N. Cross, Treas. 

Anoka 10 00 

Benson, Sundav-school 2 00 

Elk River, W. M. S 10 00 

Fairmont, Ladies 5 00 

Faribault, Officers and Teach- 
ers, Deaf and Dumb School 9 00 

Friends 1 00 

Freeborn, '-Useful Workers." 25 00 
Hancock and Lake Emily, M.S. 14 60 
Hutchinson, Y. P.M. S, special 125 

Lake City, W. H. M. S 30 00 

Mapleton, Ladies 4 00 

Minneapolis, Plymouth W. H. 
M. S., to const. Miss Nettie 
Stevens, Miss Ella G. Beard 
and Miss Ella W. Bucknam, 

L. Ms 131 68 

Plymouth, Y. L. M. S 11 67 

Mrs. Taintor 25 00 

Open Door, W. M. S. Special, 

$5; Y. L. M. S., $5 10 00 

Second, Missee' Sunday- 
school Class 15 25 

Children 8 Mission Band. 7 50 

VineCh.,W. M. S 10 00 

Owatonna, W. M. S., $4.71; 

Aux., $20.29 25 00 

St. Paul, Plymouth, W. H. 
M. S. $32.68; Sunday-school, 

$9.09 41 77 

Atlantic, Y. L. M. S 12 50 

Sauk Center, Ladies' Society, 

of which $15 special 25 26 

Sunday-school 8 00 



Stillwater, W. M. S .$4 00 

West Union, H. M. S 10 00 

Winona, W. H. M. S 100 00 

Zumbrota, H. M.S 7 65 

West Orin, W., Mrs. Royena E. 
Herrick - 4 50 



$561 63 $1,008 99 

Appleton, by Rev. J.T.Marvin 3 00 

Benson, by Rev. C. A. Ruddock 2 40 

Center Chain, G. R. Brown and Wife 3 25 

Janesville, by Rev. H. R. Baker 10 25 

Northfield, by C. W. Grcss 61 64 

Princeton, by Rev. A. J. Hayner 4 00 

Red Wing, A Friend 10 00 

Rochester, W. H. Knapn 5 00 

Rush City, by Hev. W. Bergstrom 3 00 

St. Cloud, W. F. Hicks 4 00 

St. Paul, Atlantic Ch., by C. S. Col- 
ton 6 02 

Mrs. C. M. Hyde 2 00 

Sleepy Eye, by Rev. S. M. McNeill 5 51 

Wabasha, by G. P. De Long 17 50 

Winona, by Rev. H. M. Herrick 5 50 

Anonymous 3 00 

KANSAS— $1,125.92. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Dougherty, 
Treas. Kan. H. M. Soc: 

Woman's H. M. Soc 113 82 

Anthony 42 00 

Ash Rock, Harmony and New 

Maiden 4 75 

Atwood — . 10 00 

Bird City 5 30 

Diamond Springs 3 30 

Douglas 9 87 

Emporia, Welsh 10 00 

Rev. G. T. Holyoke 5 00 

Ford, Ladies' Miss. Soc 4 20 

Fort Scott 15 39 

Kiowa 10 00 

Lawrence, Plymouth Ch 126 24 

Manhattan 3 00 

Newton 4 50 

Olathe 25 00 

Oneida, W. H. M. Soc 3 00 

Osawatomie _ - 5 00 

Ottawa 100 00 

Paola. 37 38 

Salem 3 68 

Seneca, Thank-offering 2 00 

Sterling, Mr. Higley 5 00 

Stockton, F. E. Thompson 1 00 

Topeka, Rev. L. P. Broad, 

special 10 00 

Valley Falls 17 35 

Wallace 6 00 

WhiteCity 15 00 

Wyandotte, First 28 25 

736 03 

Alma, by Rev. W. C. Wheeler 4 50 

Altoona and Village Creek, by Rev. T. 

V. Davies 2 15 

Arkansas City, by Rev. D. D. De Long 15 00 

Burlington, First, by W. C. Sears 33 00 

Cheney, by Rev. J. H Lippard 5 00 

Council Grove, by Rev. L. Arrnsby 6 00 

Fairview, byE. W. McCnne 6 70 

Fairview and Iowa Union, by Rev. L. 

M. Bonnett 5 00 

Junction City, Rev. W. C. Veazie 5 00 

Kanwaka, $2; Tonganoxie, Ch.,$3, by 

Rev. A. M. Richardson 5 00 

Lenora, Wakeman and Glen Valley, 

by Rev. L. V. Slasor 1 00 

Manhattan, Ch., H. Marshall, by Rev. 

R. M. Tunnell 5 00 

Milford, by Rev. R. B. Foster 3 00 

Netawaka, by Rev. R. W. Harlow 20 00 

Osage City, by Rev. J. V. Jones 5 61 

Partridge, by Rev. F. B. Hyde 2 20 

Partridge, $25; Sedgwick, $11; Rush 
Center, $3; by Rev. W. C. Veazie. 39 00 
Severy, A. P. Polgrist 100 



40 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



Topeka, First, by II. E. Bowman, to 
const. F. L Evarts, G. W. Bradford, 
Mrs. C. L. Griffin, Mrs. C. li. Morri- 
son, Mrs. W. A. Coats and Prof. J. 

T. LovewellL. Ms. 

Wabaunsee, Mrs. M. E. Noyee 

Wyandotte, by Rev. W. M." Wellman. 

NEBRASKA— $690. 52. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile: 
Arborville, by Rev. J. E. 

Storm $20 00 

Arlington, A Friend, by Mrs. 

L. II. Lewis G 00 

Ashland, by F. II. (.'nicker- 
ing 10 or 

Camp Creek, by G. T. Lee... 11 00 
Eagle, by Rev. W. S. Hills... 14 00 
Friend, by Rev. W. E. David- 
son 5 00 

Hastings, by Rev. W. Wal- 
ters, for Lamplighters 20 00 

Kearney, by Rev. J. Askin... 42 50 
Milford, by J. W. Blackburn. 7 12 
North wood Center, N. II., by 

Mrs. E. E. Wiggins 12 00 

Omaha, First, by J. C. Wil- 
bur 150 00 

Springfield, by C. Smith 17 41 

Sutton, by W. C. Walter .... 10 22 
Syracuse, by Rev. E. II. 

Baker £ 50 

Talmage, by Rev. I. T. Hull . . 13 00 
York, Ch., by J. C. Kilner, 
$00 ; Cong. Sunday-school, 
by II. Seymour, ^1*4... 74 00 



$330 23 
1 00 
4 50 



$429 82 
Received by Mis. D. B. Perry, 
Treas. : 

Arborville. $10 00 

Lincoln, First 59 50 

( Mnaha, St. Mary's Avenue .. 5 00 
Syracuse 10 00 

$84 50 514 32 

Blair, by E. N. Bradley 28 15 

Doniphan, by Rev. J. H. Embree 5 00 

Eagle, H. C. Wolph 2 00 

Freewater and Moline, by Rev. J. W. 

Hadden.... 1 00 

Inland, by Rev. G. Grob __ 2 80 

Lincoln, First, by Rev. E. S. Ralston. 100 00 

Long Pine, by Rev. S. I. Hanford 12 05 

McCook, by W. F. Lawson 5 30 

New Castle, by Rev. W. J. Parker 4 55 

Norfolk, Rev. J. J. Parker 8 15 

Petersburg and West Cedar Valley, by 

Rev. S. Pearson 3 25 

Ravenna, by Rev. R. M. Truvers 2 30 

Seward, First Ch., Birthday offering, 

by Rev. A. M. Darley 1 05 

NORTH DAKOTA— $19.70. 

Caledonia, Ladies' Soc, by Rev. E. II. 
Btickney ._ 12 10 

Fort Abercrombie, Ladies' H. M. Soc. 

of Cong. Ch., by Rev. W. Edwards.' 5 60 

Sanborn, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Donald- 
son, by Rev. J. W. Donaldson 2 00 

SOUTH DAKOTA-$151.37. 

Received by Rev. D. R. Tomlin : 

Alexandria $10 00 

Chamberlain.. 21 04 

Frankfort 7 28 

Redfield 20 Oil 

Watertown 10 00 

68 92 

Alexandria, $10; Miss II. Burton, $5, 

by Rev. A. T. Lyman 15 00 

Arena and Logan, by Rev. M. E. 

Bacon 6 25 



Canton, by Rev. J. L. Granger 

Chamberlain, by Rev. W. B. Hub- 
bard 

De Smet, by Rev. J. R. Bonney .. 

Dover, by Rev. J. II. Cumey _ 

Howard City, by Rev. 1. A. Shanton.. 

Howard, J. E. Mallery 

Huron, Woman's II. M. Soc, by Mrs. 
S. Fi field 

Oahe, Shiloh Ch., by T. L. Riggs 

Scotland, F. R. M 

COLORADO— $0.00. 

Crested Butte, Ladies' Miss. Soc, by 
Mrs. V. F. Axtell 

MONTANA— $20.00. 

Billings, Rev. B. F. Shuart _ 

Livingston, by Rev. W. C. Fowler 

UTAH— $16.25. 

Ogden City, by Rev. A. J. Bailey 

( AL1FORNIA— $148.67. 

Auburn, by Rev. C. L. Corwin 

Belmont, Mrs. E. L. and Miss H. 

Reed.. 

Cedarville and Fort Bidwell, by Rev. 

E. D. Howells 

Gold Hill, by Rev. J. H. Warren 

Los Angeles, A M. Duncan 

Modesta, by Rev. W. O. W. Pringle .. 

Murphy's, by Rev. H. Chapman 

Ontario, by Rev. W. H. Wolcott 

Riverside, by Rev. T. C. Hunt 

San Francisco, Charlotte S. Barnard. 

Sierra Madre, by Rev. L. H. Frary 

Westminster, by Rev. D. Goodsell 

West Point, by Rev. A. K. Crawford- 



$2 75 

15 00 

15 25 
2 20 

16 00 

1 00 

600 

2 00 
40 



6 00 



10 00 
10 00 



16 25 



$3 £0 

20 00 

9 00 
5 00 
5 00 
9 00 
15 00 
17 00 
11 00 
10 00 
27 67 
2 50 
14 00 



OREGON-$317.32. 

Received by Rev. G. H. Atkinson, D. D. : 

Dalles $15 00 

Mt. Zion 2 75 

17 75 

Received by James Steele, 

Treas. Or. and W. T. II. M. 
Soc. : 

Or. and Wash. Ter. Woman's 
Board of H. M $34 30 

Corvallis, Rev. G. H. Lee and 
wife 5 00 

East Portland, First 15 77 

Oregon City, Mrs. W. Fish, by 
Mrs. (i. H. Atkinson 3 65 

Portland, First Ch., to const. 
J. Steele and F. M. War- 
ren, Sr., L. Ms 188 00 

246 72 

Arlington and Pasco, by Rev. D. 

Wirt 47 00 

Corvallis, by Rev. G. H. Lee 4 25 

Portland, Mrs. M. D. Kelsey.. 1 00 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $107.01. 

Cheney, by Rev. A. II. Howells 21 56 

East Tacoma, by Rev. S. L. Cheadle.. 15 00 

Seattle, by Rev. II. L. Bates 25 (X) 

Spokane Falls, by Rev. J. Edwards .. 6 00 

"Joyful Workers," in First Ch., by 

Roxine M. Edwards _ 4 75 

Walla Walla, First, by Anna Hill 17 05 

First Ch., $13.45; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$2.55 16 00 

West Fcrndale, by Rev. G. Baker 2 25 

Home Missionary 404 20 

Expended during the year by the Aux- 
iliaries named ■. .$144,079 14 

Received at this office, in March, 1888. 58,331 26 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



41 



Donation* of Clot/tiny, etc. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Ladies 1 Benev, Soc, of 
Central Oh., bv Mrs. •James 11. Goldey, 
two barrels and freight $201 27 

Elyria, O., Ladles' Home Miss. Soc, by 
Miss C. K. Crandall, two boxes and 
cash 136 14 

Farmington, Ct., Ladies" Benev. Soc, by 

F. ('. Jones, barrel and box 146 24 

Hartford, Ct., Ladies' Sue. of Asvlnm 

Hill Ch., by Mrs. J. II. Cone, barrel.. 158 00 
Ladies' Home Miss. Soe. of First Cli., 
by Miss Emma Runcc, through The 

Woman's Home Missionary Union of 

Conn., barrel and cash 75 00 

Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. of Pearl St. 
I'll., by Hatlie B. Cowles, throtlgh 
The Woman's Cong. Home Miss. 
Union of Conn., barrel 66 04 

Ladies' Sew. Soc. of South Ch., by Mrs. 

Charles 11. Smith, through TheWom- 
an's Cong. Home Miss. Union of 
Ct., box and barrel 410 00 

Littleton, X. II., Ladies' Soc, by Julia 
A. Eaton, box and freight 80 00 

Middletown, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. 
Soc. of First Ch., by Miss C. M. Ba- 
con, barrel, cash and freight 106 00 

New Haven, Ct.., Ladies' Home Miss. 
Soc. of First Ch., by Mary E. Ben- 
nett, three boxes and cash 692 62 

Ladies' Aid Soc. of United Ch., by 
Louise H. De Forest, two boxes 391 76 

New York City, Ladies' Home Miss. 
Soc. of Broadway Tabernacle Ch., bv 

Mrs. W. D. Harper, twenty trunks 4,429 13 

State Charities Aid Assoc, bundle. 

Norwich, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 
of Broadway Ch., by Gertrude H. Lin- 
nell, through The Woman's Cong. 
Home Miss. Union of Conn., box 252 45 

St. Louis, Mo., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 
of Pilgrim Ch., by Mrs. W. J. Wash- 
burn, and package from Ch. in Mem- 
phis, four barrels and package 558 15 

Salisbury, Ct., Ladies' Sew. Soc, by 

Mrs. Monroe Clark, barrel 62 73 

Springfield, Mass., Class Sixteen of First 
Ch. Sunday-school, by Miss L. Bates, 
two barrels 75 00 

Springfield, O., Ladies' Miss. Soc of 
First Ch., by Lucy R. Grant, package. 7 95 

Stonington, Ct., Ladies' Soc of Second 
Ch., by Martha C. T. Hill, two boxes, 
cash and package 212 62 

SufBeld, Ct., Young Ladies' S. S. Class 
of First Ch., by Ella M. Clark, through 
The Woman's Cong. H. M. Union, 
Conn., box 17 50 

W 7 est Hartford, Ct., Elmwood Soc, by 
Mrs. Fred A. Handall, barrel 62 45 

Grinnell, Iowa, by Mrs. T. O. Douglass : 

Charles City, box 65 00 

Clinton, box.. 45 (X) 

Davenport, box 56 00 

Denmark, box 55 00 

Des Moines, Y. H. S., box 20 00 

Dunlap, box 40 00 

Franklin, box 15 00 

Gilman and Newbury, box 35 00 

Grinnell, three boxes 155 00 

Muscatine, box 58 00 

Ona\va,box 116 00 

Ottumwa, box 35 00 

Rockford, box 100 00 

Traer, box 60 00 

Webster City, box . 25 00 

Greenville, Mich., bv Mrs. £. F. Grabill: 

Galesburg, W. H. M. S , box 41 28 

Muskegon, W. H. M S., box and cash 80 00 
Vicksburgh, Busy Bees, quilt 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONAKY 
SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Massachunetts Home Missionary 
Society, in March, by Hkv. Edwin B. Palmek, 
Treas. 

A friend, "F." $ 50 

Amherst, North, by S. E. Harrington, to 
const. Mrs. Caroline F. Dickinson and 

(has. H. Kellogg J, Ms 80 00 

Sophia E. Hubbard 5 00 

Andover. South, by George Gould, for A. 

II. M. S. 131 25 

West, by E. F. Holt 50 00 

Ashtield, by Mrs. Daniel Williams, to 
const. Benjamin Stars, a L. M. of A. H. 

M. S 56 10 

Berkley, b\ -Rev. J. E. M. Wright 4 00 

Boston, "B. & L. " for largest need, 

special 10 00 

Charlestown, First, A Friend 1 00 

Winthrop, bv George S.Poole 146 45 

Dorchester, W, A. Dyer, for A. H. M. S. 5 00 

Second, by Miss K. Tolman, of wh. 

§30 for A. II. M. S 119 17 

Jamaica Plain, Central, by K. W. Wood 100 00 
Boylston St., Primary Class in S. S., 

by Miss l.la.I. Hammerle 5 00 

Mt. Vernon, by Mrs. Susan Collins 5 00 

Several Ladies, by Mrs. J. S. Ambrose, 

for A. H. M. S 10 00 

South, Phillips, Mrs. A. Simonds 25 00 

Rev. Geo. F. Stanton, to const. Miss S. 

Augusta Dole, of Lowell, & L. M 30 00 

Braintree, First, by A. B. Keith 18 81 

Brimtield, First, by M. H. Corbin 6 20 

Brockton, Porter Evangl., by Geo. C. 
Cary, to const. Chas. A. Jenny, Frank 
W. Sears, and Annie G. Packard L. Ms. Ill 01 

Cambridge, A Friend, >'H." 1 00 

Cambridgeport, Wood Memorial, by 

Mrs. J. C. Stevens 96 

Chelsea, First, by H. W. Jeffers 36 00 

Chicago, 111., Partial returns from W. F. 

Davis Suit 148 70 

Conway, Lucy E. Hale, by Rev. C. B. Rice. 3 00 

Cummington, E. S. Pettengill, for A. H. 

M. S 5 00 

Dalton, MissC. L. Crane 100 00 

W.M.Crane ._ 100 00 

Dana, by Rev. J. G. Willis 2 00 

Dartmouth, South, by E. B. Sturtevant. . . 15 00 
Dedham, First Evangl. S. S., by E. P. 

Burgess, for Chn. Bohm. Fund 25 00 

Deerfield, Orthodox, by Rev. A. Hazen, 

D.D, for A. H. M. S __ 27 19 

South, bv C. A. Stowell.for A. H. M. S. 49 05 

Duxbury, bv Dea. Sheldon 4 00 

Enfield, bv *L. D. Potter 50 00 

Everett, First, S. S., by A. B. Shrpardson, 

fortheDebt 15 39 

Fairhaven, Sarah Pop.- 3 00 

Fall River, Central, by R. B. Borden, of 

wh. $52.57 from Mon. Con. Coll 293 62 

Falmouth, A "shut-in." 5 00 

"Coelum" 1 00 

Fitchburg, C. C, by II. A. Hill, for A. H. 

M.S..... 5158 

Rollstone, by W. E. Clifford, to const. 
Miss Marv L. Barker, WarrenB. Wheel- 
er, and Herbert W. Eaton L. Ms 90 00 

Framingham, "A Friend". 40 00 

Franklin, First, bv Chas. Gowen _ 43 02 

Gloucester, West, by Rev. J. C. Alvord.. 10 00 
Greenfield, Second, by Lucy A. Sparhawk 45 00 
Hadley, First, by Alphonso Dickinson .. 47 77 
Hampden Benevolent Association, 
by Chas. Marsh, Tr. 

Agawam $21 31 

Feeding Hills. 15 00 

Holvoke, First 20 30 

Ladies" Home Circle 15 00 

Ludlow, First, to const, with pre- 
viousgifts, Rev. M. P. Dicker 

a L M 19 00 

South Hadley Falls. 20 00 



42 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



Springfield, North $159 69 

Women's Miss. Society 5 25 

OlivetS. School 17 49 

South 182 05 

"West Springfield, Park St 51 50 

Y. P. S. C. E., for A. H. M. S.. 25 00 

Wilbraham 30 50 



$582 14 

1 00 

32 35 

12 35 
24 40 



Heath, Rev. B. B. Cutler 

Holbrook, Winthrop, by Elisha Holbrook 
Holden, by Rev. W. Rand, for A. H. 

MS 

Holland, by Rev. Solomon Bixby 

Housatonic, by S. W. Wright, to const. 

Rev. F. £. Butler and T. G. Ramsdell 

L. Ms 110 74 

Hyde Park, E. P. H, by J. Ellery Piper.. 5 00 

First, byJ. Ellery Piper 50 00 

First, S. S., by Chas. F. Holt, for A. H. 
M.S.. 25 00 

I. C. Burgess 10 00 

Lawrence, South, by J. Y. Buzzell 27 84 

Lexington, Hancock, by W. W. Baker... 20 00 
Lowell, Eliot, by James Howard 38 88 

First, by I. Warren Bisbee, to const, 
with previous gifts, Arthur M. Field, 

aL. M 18 00 

Ludlow, First, A. T. Jones, for A. H. M. 

S 10 00 

Maiden, First, by Herbert Porter, of wh. 

$77 for Debt 161 75 

Linden, S. A. D., for A. H. M. S., and 
to const., a L. M 50 00 

Mrs. J. W. Wellman, by Rev. W. G. 

Puddefoot, for A. H. M. S 10 00 

Marlboro, Union Evangl. by Rev. A. F. 

Newton, to const. Daniel Austin Walker 

and Dea. Chas. F. Robinson L. Ms. of 

A. H. M. S 100 32 

Marshfield, East, Second, Men's Bible 

Class, by Israel Hatch 9 00 

Mass. "L. D.,"forA. H. M. S..._ 30 00 

Medfield, Second, by Francis S. Wright. 89 41 
Medway, Village, by Rev. Rufus K. 

Harlow, for A. H. M. S 175 32 

West,C. Albert Adams 10 00 

Middleboro, Second, by Eben Pickens 58 39 

North, by S. White, to const. Warren 

S. Gibbs, aL. M. of A. H M. S 53 72 

Millis, Miss Marinda Daniels, to const. 

MissE. Phillips,aL. M 30 00 

Montague, by Sanford Marsh. 36 00 

Montreal, P. Q., Ella F. M. Williams 10 00 

Nahant, Est. of Geo. Curtis, by L. C. 

Waterman, Trustee 5000 00 

Natick, First Sunday-school, by R. E. 

Bowers, to const. Rev. F. E. Sturgis, a L. 

M. of A. H. M. S 50 00 

New Bedford, North, by J. W. Hervey, 

for A. H.M. S 138 00 

Thatcher A. Hatch, by J. W. Hervey, 

for A. H.M. S ._ ._ 5 00 

Newbury port, Prospect St., by C. A. 

Bliss, for A. H. M. S..._ 283 54 

New Hampshire, "L.," for A. H. M. S.._ 10 00 
New Salem, Thank-offering for services 

of Rev. L. Jones, by Rev. A. H. Plumer 5 00 
North Brookfield, First, by A. G. Stone, 

to const. A. J. Goddard, Hervey F, 

Moore, and Mrs. Helen H. Clapp L. Ms. 

of A. H. M. S 175 00 

Northfield, Trinitarian, Two Ladies, by 

Miss Mary T. Dutton _ 10 00 

Paxton, by Rev. A. Morton, for A. II. M. 

S 4 00 

By C. A. Streeter _ 18 00 

Plymouth, Pilgrimage, by George G. 

Dyer 183 48 

Quincy, Evangelical, by Rev. E. Norton. 6 35 

Randolph, Parsonage, by Rev. J. C. Lab- 

aree, for Boh. work 7 00 

Revere, Beachmont, J. F. Bowditch, by 

Thomas Britton _ 3 29 

Samokov, Bulgaria, Pilgrim, for A. H. M. 

S ._.;. .... 10 00 

Sherborn, Pilgrim, by Lowell Coolidge— 30 00 
Shutesbury, by N. A. Briggs COO 



Somerville, Prospect Hill, by M. P. 

Eliot $5129 

South bridge, by F. W. Eaton 92 22 

Stoneham, by Rev. D. A. Newton to const 

Mrs. D. A. Newton.a L. M. of A. H. M. S. 53 27 
Stoughton, First, by Sam'l Clapp, interest 

onmortgage 100 00 

Sunderland, by Rev. W. G. Puddefoot, 

forA.H.M.S 27 52 

Taunton, A Friend, for the Debt 5 00 

Templeton, Trinitarian, by John Whitte- 

more 18 88 

Walpole, Orthodox, by Frederic Guild... 62 55 

Walthain, Phebe S.Garfield 1 40 

Ware, A Friend in the work 1 00 

Wareham, First, by H. W. Barrows 36 00 

Wayland, "L.," for A. H. M. S 5 00 

Wendell, by Rev. P. F. Barnard 11 50 

Mrs. E. H. Evans, by Rev. P. F. Barnard 5 00 
Weymouth and Braintree, Union, by H. 

A. Pettingell, of wh. $100 to A. H. M. S. 122 65 
Whitinsville, special, by Edward Whitin, 

for A. H. M. S 405 87 

Whitman, by W. R. Vining 76 52 

Wilbraham, North, Grace Union, by H. 

W. Cutler, to const. Reuben Sikes and 

Fred. Pease L. Ms. of A. H. M. S 130 25 

Williamsburg, Ilaydenville, by H. Clay 

Smith, for A. H. M. S 1000 

Winchester, A Friend 2 50 

Winchester, First, by Eugene Tappan... 31 80 

for Slavic Dept. Oberlin 63 78 

Worcester, Old South, by Geo. M. Pierce, 

to const. H. H. Merriam, a L. M 36 14 

Union, by S. Newton, for A. H. M. S. . 340 10 

Wrentham, Miss Jemima Hawes 50 00 

$11,608 28 

Home Missionary 10 20 

$11,618 48 



Donations of Clothing, etc., received and reported 
at the rooms of the Mass. Home Miss. Society, 
in March. 

Andover, West, Ladies, books, (and 
cash, $41.60) $81 60 

Boston, Park St., Ladies, by Mrs. J. E. 

Parker, supplies (and cash, $12.50.).. 60 00 

Lee, Ladies 1 Benev. Society, by Miss C. 

Rowland, barrel and freight 54 00 

Newton, Eliot, Ladies' Benev. Society, 
by Mrs. E. J. Locke, barrel and box 
and freight _ 171 80 

Newtonville, Central, Ladies, by Mrs. 
E. E. Stiles, two barrels and freight.. 97 05 

Springfield, Eastern Avenue, by Mrs. 

S. S. Rich, barrel 57 00 

South, Ladies, by Mrs. G. C. McClean, 
supplies 317 91 

Westboro, Ladies' Sewing Circle, by 
Miss Susan M. Miller, two barrels and 
freight 115 67 

Worcester, Piedmont, Benev. Union, 
by Mrs. T. A. Shaw, two barrels and 
freight 170 00 

$1,125 03 



ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society 

in, February, Aaron B. Mead, Treas. 

Amboy $25 00 

Ashkum. _ 6 84 

Bartlett 18 50 

Beecher 22 70 

Bunker Hill 34 00 

Bureau 21 46 

Byron 12 30 

Canton 50 60 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



43 



Chebanse, W. II. M. Union $3 00 

Chenoa, Mrs. E. M.Pike 5 00 

Chicago, Plymouth Ch. 187 61 

New England Ch., Ladies' Miss. So- 
ciety 10 50 

"Steady Streams " 17 16 

South Park Ch 10 00 

Church of the Redeemer 50 00 

Crystal Lake 17 26 

De Pue 27 73 

Dover, Miss M. M. Allen 5 00 

Joseph B. Allen 1 00 

Farmington, special 110 00 

Oalva 37 40 

Geneseo 199 49 

Jug and Envelope Band 10 00 

Glencoe 98 18 

Granville, special 121 12 

Marseilles 65 50 

Mendon, special 91 28 

Mrs. J. Fowler 25 00 

Special, James II. Dudley 50 00 

Henry P. Baldwin 25 00 

Mrs. Benton 10 00 

Millburn 15 00 

Morton, Ladies' Society, $7.65 : Young 
Missionaries, $8.48 ; S. S. Birthday 

Box, $6. _ 22 13 

Oak Park, S. S., $35.50 ; Ladies' Benev. 

Society, $16.50 52 00 

Payson 40 00 

Plymouth, Mrs. It. C, and Miss Amy 

Burton 10 00 

Riley, Mrs. Maria J. Sears 5 00 

Roberts, Young People's Miss. Society. 15 00 
Rock Falls, $14.50; W. H. M. Union, 

$8; Mrs. C. V. Wright, $1.. 23 50 

Rockford, First Ch., Ladies 1 Society... 18 91 

Roodhouee, special 53 00 

Roseville 28 11 

Sheffield, Ladies' Miss. Society 3 45 

Springfield, Second 15 00 

Stark 9 00 

Sycamore, special 41 50 

Tiskilwa, Geo. C. Kellogg 10 00 

Udina. 2 50 

Victoria, W. H. M. Union 10 00 

Wauponsee Grove 3li 00 

Waverly, special 50 00 

Winnebago, special 5 00 

Winnetka 35 93 

Woodstock 3 50 

A Friend, special.. 79 74 

Bureau Association, for De Pue Mission 50 90 



$2,003 79 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTI- 
CUT. 

Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut, 
in March, Ward W. Jacobs, Treas. 

Barkhamsted, by Rev. J. B. Clarke 2 00 

Bozrah, by Rev. Geo. A. Miller 18 00 

Bridgeport, Park Street, bv F. W. Storrs, 
with contribution of Dec. 19th, 1887, 
to const. Mrs. Frances J. McLellan 
and L. H. Baker, both of Bridgeport, 

Ct.,L. Ms _ 61 00 

Canterbury, First, one sixth of income 
from Est. of Emblem L. Williams, by 

L. B. Morgan, Trustee 10 42 

Derby, Birmingham, J. Tomlinson, per- 
sonal .... 10 00 
East Haven, by F. T. jarman 28 30 



Litchfield, Milton, by Rev. Geo. J. Har- 
rison $10 88 

Meriden, First, by W. II. Catlin, for A. 
II. M. S., to const. Rev. Charles A. 
Williams, Mrs. Inez G. Taylor, Mrs. 
Sarah A. Higby, Mrs. Eliza A. Butler, 
Mrs. Lydia Miller, Nathan Olds. Sarah 
Potter, Henry S. Wilcox, all of Meri- 
den, Ct., L. Ms 400 00 

Middletown, First, by L. F. Denio 67 52 

New Britain, South, by Win. H. Hart, 
from Mrs. J. W. Cooper for A. II. M. 
S., to const. Mrs. Elizabeth S. Smith, 
Mrs. Mary E. Booth, John P. Bartlett 
and Elisha II. Cooper, all of New 

Britain, Ct., L. Ms 203 41 

New Haven, College Street, by Samuel 

Lloyd Ill 86 

Davenport, by Rev. I. C. Meserve, $75 ; 

forA.H. M.S., $50 125 00 

Newington, by II. M. Robbins 35 45 

Oxford, byR. B. Limburner. 21 98 

Plainfield, Wauregan, by Rev. H. S. Fel- 
lows &5 00 

Redding, by T. M. Abbott, add'l 3 50 

Seymour, by Robert A. Weaver 23 19 

Stratford, by C. C. Wells 20 31 

Thompson, by Josiah W. Dike 11 75 

Torrington, Third, A Friend, by F. M. 

Wheeler 10 00 

Voluntown and Sterling, Ekonk, by Rev. 

John Elderkin 17 76 

Winchester, West Winsted, by John 

Hinsdale 100 97 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber 75 00 

Poquonock,by L. R. Lord 37 20 



$1,440 50 



A Correction: In Connecticut receipts of April 
Home Missionary, instead of " Woodbridge, by 
F. T. Jarman, $25," read " Hamden, Whitney- 
ville, by F. T. Jarman, $25." 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY 
SALARIES. 

Previously acknowledged $3,483 91 

Indiana, Indianapolis 59 67 

Massachusetts, Boston, $195; Mitti- 

neague,$35 230 00 

Michigan, Hopkins Station, $5; Mus- 
kegon, $25; Nashville, $21.50; St. 

Louis, $4 55 50 

Minnesota, Hutchinson, $1.25; Minne- 
apolis, $5; Sauk Center, $15 21 25 



P,850 33 



CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledged $2,368 07 

Connecticut, Suffield 1 00 

Massachusetts, Easthampton, $50; M. 

H. M. S., $88.78. _. 138 78 

New York, New York City 15 00 

Ohio, Ashtabula 7 73 



$2,530 58 



u 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



May, 1888. 



Woman's 



j»tatc g. 



New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org. 

1805, Miss Annie A. McFarland. Concord, Sec. 
Minnesota Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. 1872, Mrs. H. L. Chase, Minneapolis. Sec. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1880, Mrs. Gertrude A. Denio, Bangor, Sec. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1881, Mrs. Leroy Warren, Lansing, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 1881, Mrs. Geo. L. Epps, f opeka,Sec. 
Ohio, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1883, Mrs. Flora K. Regal", Oberlin. Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 1883, Mrs. C. C. Creegan, Syracuse, 

Sec. 
Wisconsin, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct , 1883, Mrs. C. Matter, Brodhead. Sec. 
North Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1883, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Har- 

wbod, Sec. 



|*X. ©vcjaiti nations. 

South Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary 

Union, org. Sept., 1884, Mrs. S. E. Young 

Sioux Falls, See. 
Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Jan., 1885, Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, Hart- 
ford, Sec. 
Missouri. Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1885, Mrs. E. P. Bronson, 3100 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1885, Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Iowa, Woman's Home Missionary Union, <>rL r . 

June, 188(5, Miss Ella E. Marsh, Grinnell, Sir. 
California, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 1887, Mrs. M. L. F. Eastman, Sec. 
Nebraska, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

Nov., 1887, Mrs. L. F. Berry, Fremont, Sec. 
Florida, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Feb. 1888, Mrs. N. Barrows, Winter 

Park, Sec. 



miimoxxt a Woman's £tatc £t. pc. ©inanimation. 



Alabama. 

Arizona. 

Arkansas. 

Carolinas. 

Colorado. 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Georgia. 

Idaho. 

Indiana. 



Indian Territory. 

Kentucky. 

Louisana. 

Maryland. 

Massachusetts. 

Mississippi. 

Montana. 

Nevada. 

New Jersey. 

New Mexico. 



Oregon. 

Pennsylvania. 

Rhode Island. 

Tennessee. 

Texas. 

Utah. 

Vermont. 

Virginia. 

Washington Territory. 

Wyoming. 



gXisstonaru Jtoscs. 



For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the homes of 
its missionaries, with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance of these favors 
is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribution, attention is invited 
to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, if practi- 
cable, how soon a box will probably be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applying to the Secretaries, notify them without delay so as to 
guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. If several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the Secre- 
taries, whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, not 
by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise as "fast freight," by railroad, 
taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in the box. 
and the money, $2, $3, or $4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of freight (if it 
cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter of acknowledgment 
should be addressed. 

6. Report to the Secretaries the forwarding taf the box, its estimated value, and the amount sent 
for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the Secretaries, 
put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from whom it comes, and 
the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of acknowledgment. 

8. Mark the box, "American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New York," 
adding the name of the place from which it tomes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing money for freight, and stating the time when and the line by 
which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide in the assignment 
of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and sex of each child for whom 
the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants of the Society. It needs the same amount of 
money, therefore, in order to fulfill its' stipulations with its missionaries, as if no such gifts were 
provided; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or diminish their contribu- 
tions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are needful. 



TEE HOME MISSIONARY. 



ihT 

X- H ome Mi ss i° nar y 



Advertising Department. 

ripHE attention of the readers of THE HOME MIS- 
SIONARY, and of business men generally, is called 
to its advantages as an advertising medium. It has a 
large circulation, covering the whole country, and the use 
of its pages cannot fail to secure the most satisfactory 
returns. Address, 

The Argus Printing Co. 

44 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J. 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



The Argus Printing Co. 

No. 44 Montgomery Street, 

JERSEY CITY. 

New York Office, - - 150 Nassau Street. 
^ 

OUR JOB DEPARTMENT. 

TTAVING recently added the latest styles of type, and all modern improve* 
ments pertaining to this department, and employing the best workmen, 
we are prepared to execute First-class Printing at moderate prices. 



OUR BOOK DEPARTMENT. 

TN this department we are second to none in the State. With a large force 
of compositors, and the only type-setting machines in New Jersey, we can 
furnish all classes of Book and Law Printing with great despatch. 



OUR PRESSWORK DEPARTMENT, 

/^CCUPYING three floors of our magnificent building, and filled with the 
latest improved machinery, is able to cope with any house in New York 
as to prices and speed in turning out all kinds of presswork. 



OUR ELECTROTYPING DEPARTMENT 

IS a new departure in the printing trade in Jersey City, and with the newest 
labor-saving machinery, we can guarantee perfect work and entire satis- 
faction with the productions of this department. 



ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED. 



<•>- 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



The Jersey City Argus 



ONE Y DEMOCRA TIC PAIL Y NE WSPAPER 
PUBLISHED IN JERSEY CITY. 



LARGEST CIRCULATION IN HUDSON CD 



Offers unexampled advantages to advertisers, being a 
family paper, which reaches all classes in all parts of 
the County, from Bergen Point to Union Hill. No 
advertiser can afford to overlook it. 

Main Office: No. 44 MONTGOMERY STREET. 
Branch Offices in NEW YORK CITY, H0B0KEN AND BAYONNE. 

CHAS. S. CLARKE, Jr., Manager. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



MOZART PARLOR ORCAN and AVERY SEW- 
ING MACHINE, Worth $150, Both for $60. 

A GREAT 
COMBINATION. 




DIMENSIONS: Height, 
74 in.; Depth, 11 in.; 
Length, l"> in.; Weight, 
boxed, 3"i0 lbs. 

This 1 1 ,i ml - ■) m e 
Parlor Organ, 5 Oc- 
taves, «• <> n t a i n i n g 
Four .Sets of Reeds, 
Nine Stops, Two 
Knee Swells, Price, 
S90 00. 

Elegance of Finish, 
Elasticity of Touch, 
Pipe-like Tone. Origin- 
ality of Design. Beauty 
of style. 



NEW improved high 
arm, new niechniih :afl 
principles and rotary 
movements, automatic, 
direct and perfect act i mi 
cylinder shuttle, self- 
acting needle, positive 
feed, no springs, few 
parts, minimum weight, 
no friction, no noise" no 
wear.no fatigne,no"tan- 
trums," capacity unlim- 
ited, always in order, 
richly or n am e n ted, 
nickel plated, and gives 
perfect satisfaction. 



Having perfected arrangements for the purpose 
of introduction, with the manufacturers of the 
above Organs and Sewing ^Machines, which are 
listed at $90109 and $60 00 respecti vely, we are able 
to offer both at the price of the Sewing Machine, 
$00.00. Both fully guaranteed satisfactory or 
money refunded. Ad dress for further particulars, 
or call and examine at the warerooms of the Sew- 
ing Machine and Organ Association. 

{From the Christian at Work. ) 
We hereby call the attention of our patrons to 
the sewing machine and parlor organ combina- 
tion, by which both of these valuable articles 
(which every well-ordered home finds so indis- 
pensable) are offered at the price of an ordinary 
sewing machine. The reference given, that of the 
Alford & Berkele Co., is sufficient with us to be- 
lieve that the Company will do as they say. We 
consider it one of the best offers ever made in this 
direction. 

P. C. CANDEE & CO., Sole Agents. 

No. 7 West 14th Street, New York City. 
Eeference, THE ALFORD & BERKELE CO., 
P. O. Box 3002. 77 Chambers Street. 

CLINTON H. MEHEELY BELL CO. 

TROY, NEW YORK, 

Manufacture Superior. 
CHURCH and SCHOOL BELLS. 




INCINNATI BELLFQUNDRY GO 



SUCCESSORS IN BLYMYER BELLS TO THE 

"BLYMYER MANUFACTURING CO 

,r?\ CATALOGUE WITH 1800 TESTIMONIALS. 



ELIS.CHURCH.SCHOOLFIRE ALARM 



MENEELT & COMPANY, 
WEST TfiOY, N. Y., BELLS, 

For Churches, Schools, etc. , also Chimes 
and Peals. For more than half aceutury 
noted for superiority over all others. 



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THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price could not 
well be less. Its whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they prefer to pay, 
it will be sent without further charge, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members; Missionaries 
of the Society and its Auxiliaries; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their Congregations; 
also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy for every ten dollars collected and 
paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. Pas- 
tors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this Journal at the 
Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 



APPLICATIONS FOR AID. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should make 
a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an application. They 
should also give these particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations. 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office addres" ' Town, County, State. 

Does he reside on his field of labor ? Is he installed pastor ? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry ? 

Of what local church is he a member? 

Of what Ministerial Association ? 

The number of persons composing his family. 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people, and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage? 

Is aid expected from any other source? 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. S. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to the Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the conditions, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by the 
trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose limits the congregation is found, has a " Committee 
of Missions, ,1 the members of that Committee should certify these statements, the standing of the 
minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no such " Committee 
of Missions 11 exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more neighboring clergymen 
acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet gathered, applicants will follow 
the same course as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary of the 
Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing all the 
particulars named above, and indorsed as , efore. To this the certificate of the missionary that the 
congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 



FORM OF A BEQUEST. 
I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall 

let as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the 
year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said 
Society, and under its direction. 



MAY, 188S, 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible House, *lstor Place, Jfew York. 



Rev. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 
Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D., » _ . - • ■ „ 

Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D.D., \ Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. CLAPP, D.D., Treasurer. 

Executive Committee:— Mr. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; Mr. WM. HENRY SMITH; Rev. WM. M. 
TAYLOR, D. D.; Mr. CHARLES H. PARSONS ; Mr. ALBERT WOODRUFF ; GEO. P. SHELDON. 
Esq.; Rev. JAMES G. ROBERTS, D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; Mr. JOSEPH WM. 
RICE; Mr. HERBERT M. DIXON ; Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D.; Rev. ROBERT R. MERE- 
DITH, D. D.; Mb. FRANCIS FLINT ; WM. IVES WASHBURN, Esq., Recording Secretary. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for 

Correspondence. 

Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, and to the Woman's 

Department, may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y, 



DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS, 

In Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders ; also Communications relating to the 
business matters of The Home Missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be addressed 
to Alex's H. Clapp, Treasurer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Post-Office Orders should be drawn on STATION D, New York City. 
A Payment of $50 constitutes a Life Member. 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Clark C. Otis, Financial Superintendent, Bible House, New York. 

Rev. Henry A. Schaupfler, Work among Bohemians, Poles, etc., Cleveland, O. 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, Work among Germans, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandinavians, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Rev. Leroy Warren Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. Edw. D. Cdrtis Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rev. J. H. Morley Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Franklin B. Doe St. Louis. Mo. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. 

..New Mexico. 

Eby. Geo. A. Hood, Ashland, Wis. 



Rev. John L. Maile Omaha, Neb. 

Rev. Hiram D. Wiard Mitchell, Dak. 

Rev. H. C. Simmons Fargo, No. Dak. 

Rev. C. M. Sanders ..Denver, Col. 

Rev. W. S. Hawkes Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. J. H. Warren, D.D... San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. G. H. Atkinson, D.D Portland, Or. 



SECRETARIES AND TREASURERS 

OF THE AUXILIARIES. 

Rbv. JONATHAN E. ADAMS, Secretary Maine Missionary Society Bangor, Me. 

JOHN L. CROSBY, Esq., Treasurer " Bangor, Me. 

Rev. EDWARD H. GREELEY, D.D., Secretary, New Hampshire Home Miss. Soc. Concord, N. H. 

Hon. LYMAN D. STEVENS, Treasurer ...... ■' " Concord. N. H. 

Rev. CHARLES S. SMITH, Secretary . Vermont Domestic " Montpelier, Vt. 

J. C. EMERY, Esq., Treasurer " " Montpelier, Vt. 

Rev. JOSHUA COIT, Secretary . Massachusetts Home *' I 22 Congr. House, 

Rev. EDWIN B. PALMER, Treasurer .... " " j Boston, Mass. 

Rev. ALEXANDER McGREGOR, Secretary Rhode Island " " Pawtucket, R. I. 

EDWIN BARROWS. Esq., Treasurer " " " Providence, R. I. 

Rev. WILLIAM H. MOORE, Secretary Missionary Soc. of Connecticut. Hartford, Conn. 

WARD W. JACOBS, Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. CHARLES C. CREEGAN, D.D, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society... Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " •• New York City. 

Rev. J. G. FRASER, Secretary.. Ohio " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " '♦ " New York City. 

Rev. JAMES TOMPKINS, Secretary Illinois " " 1 151WashingtonSt, 

AARON B. MEAD, Esq., Treasurer " " " ) Chicago, Illinois. 

Rev. T. G. GRASSIE, Secretary Wisconsin " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. A. McCOLLOUGH, Esq., Treasurer " " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. DOUGLASS. Secretary Iowa " " Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. MERRILL, Esq., Treasurer _ " " " Des Moines, Iowa 



The Argus Printing Company, New York and Jersry City 



/ 



THE 






Home Missionaet. 



JUNE, 1888. 



CONTENTS. 



TREASURY NOTE 45 

THE ANNUAL MEETING 45 

OFFICERS OF THE W. H. M. 

ORGANIZATIONS 47 

NEW MISSIONARY DISTRICT... 47 

A STRIKING ANOMALY 47 

RESIGNATION OF REV. DR. 

CREEGAN 48 

THE FIELD AND THE FORCE.. 49 
FRESH FACTS AND FIGURES... 51 
THE FIRST BOHEMIAN CON- 
GREGATIONAL CHURCH 52 

THAT GROUND-HOG SKIN 53 

WYOMING RANCHES 55 

FROM A SWEDISH MISSIONARY 58 
HOW TO HELP THE SCANDI- 
NAVIAN WORK 59 

THE ROLL OF HONOR 60 

GOOD NEWS 62 

A LETTER FROM TURKEY 64 

SUGGESTP7E 66 

A PIECE OF PAPER 66 

FROM A GERMAN MISSION- 
ARY 66 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 67 

Oregon and Washington 67 

Connecticut 67 

Constitution op W. H. U. of Conn. 68 

A Perplexed Treasurer 70 

Nebraska 70 

A Deserved Tribute 70 

An Outburst 71 

A Message 71 

Too True 72 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 73 

Missionary News 73 

Banner State this Month -. . 73 

A Mining Town 75 

Harry 76 

A Qualified Compliment 77 

Questions 78 

AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDU- 
CATION SOCIETY 78 

APPOINTMENTS 79 

RECEIPTS 80 

WOMAN'S STATE HOME MIS- 
SIONARY ORGANIZATIONS... 88 

MISSIONARY BOXES 88 



Vol. LXI. No. 2. 



NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Bible House, Astor Place. 



SIXTY CENTS A YEA2, IN ADVANCE, POSTAM PAID. 



UTTERED AT THE POST OFFICE AT NEW YORK, K. T., AS BECOND CLASS [KAIL] MATTER. 



THE 

HOME MISSIONAKY. 

Go Pkeacu the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sent?.. ...Bom. x. 15. 

VOL. LXI. JUNE, 1888. No. 2. 

TREASURY NOTE. 

, The receipts in April were $13,808, about $3,600 less than those of 
April, 1887. The claims upon the Society are far more urgent now 
than they were then. More fields, and these more important and prom- 
ising, are open now than there were a year ago. The superintendents 
and missionaries are growing disheartened over the opportunities for 
valuable work of which they cannot avail themselves for lack of means. 
The officers are making up the annual apportionment for presentation at 
Saratoga, June 6th. Whether or not it shall provide for at least a part 
of the new work so loudly called for, depends entirely upon the dis- 
position of the churches to enlarge their gifts. With the present rate 
of receipts, no advance can be made upon last year's outlay, though 
many fields in nearly every missionary district are suffering from neglect 
that seems culpable— is culpable, unless the churches have really reached 
the limit of their giving ability. Have they reached it? It depends on 
them to say whether the conductors of the Society shall go to Saratoga 
with a scheme for the next year measured by that of the last, or with 
one more nearly commensurate with the loud calls of the Master to reap 
ripening harvests in every State and Territory already entered, and to 
go into new fields ready for the sower's hand. We wait your reply in 
the only practical way that it can be given— through your remittances 
to the Treasury. 



THE ANNUAL MEETLNG. 

Saratoga Springs, June 5-7, 1888. 

The officers of the American Home Missionary Society have made 
arrangements for reduced fares for persons attending the Annual Meet- 
ing in Saratoga, June 5-7, 1888, with the following list of roads which 
will accept return tickets issued under the certificate plan : 



46 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

Baltimore & Ohio (East of Parkersburg, Bellaire and Wheeling), 
Baltimore & Potomac, Bennington & Eutland, Buffalo, Roches- 
ter & Pittsburgh, Camden and Atlantic, Central Vermont, 
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., Delaware, Lackawanna & West- 
ern, Elmira, Cortland & Northern, Fitchburg, Grand Trunk, 
Lehigh Valley, New York Central & Hudson River, New York, 
Lake Erie & Western, New York, Ontario & Western, Norfolk 
& Western, Northern Central, Pennsylvania (except locally be- 
tween Philadelphia and New York), Philadelphia & Erie, Phila- 
delphia & Reading (except locally between Philadelphia and New 
York), Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore, Rome, Watertown 
& Ogdensburg (except on Phoenix Line — stations between Syracuse 
and Oswego), Shenandoah Valley, AVestern New York & Penn- 
sylvania, West Jersey, West Shore. 

For information as to roads west of the points above named, over 
which tickets will be sold on about same terms, apply to Rev. James 
Tompkins, Sec, 151 Washington St., Chicago. Tickets for going by 
these roads for sale June 1st, 2d, and 3d. 

All persons attending the Annual Meeting and entitled to the benefit 
of the concession, will pay full first-class fare going to the meeting, and 
have a printed form which will be furnished on application to the officers 
at the Bible House, New York, to be properly filled up and signed by the 
ticket agent at the starting-point. If the starting-point is not located on 
one of the roads included in the list here given, delegates will purchase 
to the most convenient point on one of those lines, and re-purchase by 
direct routes only, through to place of meeting. Return tickets will be 
sold at the agreed reduced fares (one third of the price paid in going) 
only to those holding these forms properly filled and countersigned. 
The printed form will give all needed information as to the purchase 
and use of tickets. 

Return tickets can be bought at any time before the end of the third 
day after adjournment of the meeting, and will be available for continu- 
ous return trip tickets only — no slop-over privileges being cdlowed under 
the rules on tickets sold at less than regular fares. 

From points in Mass. and R. I. — Round-trip tickets, good to go 
June 1st to 4th, and to stay till June 10th, will be sold on the Fitch- 
burg Railroad as follows : Boston, $7.00 ; Worcester, $6.00 ; Concord, 
Mass., $6.50; Ayer Junction, $6.00; Fitchburg, $6.00; Miller's Falls, 
$5.00; Greenfield, $4.50; Providence, R. I., $7.50. 

Round-trip tickets good for the above dates will be sold on the Boston 
and Albany Railroad «as follows: Boston, $7.00; South Framingham, 
$6.50; Worcester, $6.00; Palmer, $5.50; Springfield, $5.00; Provi- 
dence, R. I., $7.50. No concessions are made on Connecticut roads. 

No certificates are needed to secure these round-trip tickets. 



L888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 47 

Steamboats. — It is expected that the New York and Albany Boats 
(People's Line) and the New York and Troy Boats (Citizens Line) will 
sell Round-trip tickets, from New York to Saratoga and return, for 
Three Dollars. Berths on both lines 50 cents. State rooms $1.00 and 
$2.00 on both lines. 



OFFICERS OF THE W. H. M. ORGANIZATIONS. 

The officers of the Woman's Home Missionary Organizations of the 
several States will hold an all-day meeting in the Congregational Church, 
Saratoga, Tuesday, June 5th, beginning at 10:3o a. m. Papers and 
questions for discussion will be presented by representatives from Maine, 
New Hampshire, Connecticut, Xew York, Ohio, .Michigan, Indiana, 
Wisconsin, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, Da- 
kota and Florida. 

Papers will be given by Mrs. L. F. Berry, of Nebraska ; Mrs. S. M. 
Hotchkiss, of Connecticut ; Mrs. E. S. Williams, of Minnesota ; Miss 
Annie A. McFarland, of New Hampshire; Mrs. Prof. Emerson, of Wiscon- 
sin ; Mrs. G. M.Lane, of Michigan, and others. Mrs. C. L. Goodell, of St. 
Louis, President of the Missouri W. II. M. Soc, will present a paper 
based on Joshua's command to the officers of the Israelites, " Ye shall 
pass before your brethren armed." 

It is earnestly hoped that each officer of the Organizations will make 
a great effort to be present at this meeting. 

Further information can be obtained by addressing Mrs. C. H. 
Taintor, Sec. III. W. II M. U., 151 Washington St., Chicago, III. 



A new missionary district has been constituted, consisting of Penn- 
sylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, District of Columhia, Vir- 
ginia and West Virginia. The Executive Committee has been fortunate 
in securing the Rev. Thomas W. Jones, of Saratoga Springs, N. Y., to 
superintend this important field. 



A STRIKING ANOMALY. 

The discussion of the " Perils and Benefits of Immigration" by the 
New Y^ork Congregational Club, Monday night, developed one striking 
anomaly. The leading speakers were Prof. II. H. Boyesen, of Columbia 
College, himself an immigrant from Sweden, and Gen. Stewart L. 
Woodford, a native American, and Puritan of the Puritans. Yet it was 
the foreigner who saw the gravest danger to the republic in unrestrained 
immigration, and it was the American who contended that restrictions 



48 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

were not only impossible but undesirable. Prof. Boyesen has made this 
question a profound study. He is no vulgar alarmist. He speaks his 
sober convictions, based upon exceptional opportunities for a correct 
knowledge of the facts. In the growth of Socialism and Anarchy, and 
in the multiplying materials from other lands that feed these distempers, 
he sees a fiery writing "on the wall, which leads him to predict a social 
crisis in America, and that speedily, which will move the very founda- 
tions out of place. It may be, in all this, he fails to appreciate the 
native American character, and denies full credit to the stability of 
American institutions. 

Gen. Woodford on the other hand is a thorough optimist. He re- 
gards the outcry against immigration as the plea of cowardice. The 
masses of all lands have always been on the move, and their movements 
have always been for the better. Foreign immigration to America is a 
phase of the universal law. He is not sorry for it. Welcome the 
struggle, if it must come ! It will not destroy the United States, and it 
will uplift other nations. To stay these incoming millions is as im- 
possible as to turn back the tide that throws them on our shores, and to 
wish to stay them is akin to the selfishness of the old Jew who killed 
the divine immigrant and rejected the benefits he brought. 

The speakers who followed this opening, among them Drs. Bradford 
and Virgin, and President Brooks of Tabor College, held rather to the 
middle ground, contending for a measure of restriction, yet not willing 
to acknowledge all the perils so darkly portrayed. — Bourne, in The Ad- 
vance. 



RESIGNATION OF REV. DR. CREEGAN. 

It is with sincere regret that we have to record the retirement of 
Rev. Charles C. Creegan, D.D., from the office of Secretary of the New 
York State Society. Dr. Creegan has been so long and so honorably 
identified with Home Missions that it is not easy for us, all at once, to 
think of him as a foreign missionary secretary. The American Board 
have made no mistake in calling him to be their representative in New 
England . He enters upon his work in the fullness of experience and 
mental vigor, and will carry into the foreign service the same wisdom 
and zeal which have distinguished his career, first as the superintendent 
of the Rocky Mountain district of the A. II. M. S., and more recently 
as the State secretary of New York. Our best wishes go with him. 

AVe welcome also, and commend to all the churches Dr. Creegan's 
successor, Rev. Augustus G. Upton, late of Norwich, N. Y., who has 
accepted the office of State secretary and is already in the field. 



A lady in the First Church, Oakland, Cal., has contributed a house 
and lot valued at $3,000, to the California W. H. M. Society. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 49 



THE FIELD AND THE FORCE. 

The field of the American Home Missionary Society is America, as 
that word is popularly understood. The Society hears so broad a name 
because it was the first National Society organized for the purpose of 
evangelizing America. " Our Country for Christ," is its motto. Not 
that its friends and supporters would stop with America, — their ultimate 
aim is to save the world. This, however, they believe they can best and 
most speedily accomplish by ik beginning at Jerusalem." They feel that 
the problems which confront America, and which involve the nation's 
life, and the perpetuity of her institutions, are the first problems for 
Americans to solve. 

The field which this Society occupies, naturally divides itself into 
two distiuct portions: 1st, those States which are able to care for the 
work within their own borders, and 2d, those which are in a measure 
dependent upon others for help. 

A quarter of a century before the organization of the National So- 
ciety, in 182G, the Congregational churches t of New England had been 
engaged in home missionary operations. Beyond New England west- 
ward even to the Mississippi, their missionaries had gone preaching the 
Gospel to the destitute. As the work began to assume national 
proportions, however, it became evident that there must be a National 
Society. At its organization, the several State societies surrendered the 
work they had been doing beyond their own borders, to the National 
Society. By the terms of stipulation they ceased to be independent 
Societies, even for their own local work, and became auxiliary to, and 
integral parts of the National Society, bound together in one whole by 
a common interest, and governed by the same general principles and 
rules. 

These Auxiliaries assume entire responsibility for the prosecution of 
the missionary work within their own bounds, and pledge their hearty 
co-operation with the National Society in carrying the Gospel to the 
regions beyond. Their officers are the sole agents of the National So- 
ciety on their own fields, advocating its claims, and collecting funds for 
its treasury. Their missionaries are its missionaries, their revenue its 
revenue, their work its work. All surplus funds are sent to the na- 
tional treasury, and donations specially designed for national work are 
at once, on request of the donor, transmitted by the treasurer of the 
Auxiliary to the treasurer of the National Society. 

To-day this auxiliary system includes not merely the New England 
States, but New York, Ohio, Illinois, Southern Wisconsin, and Iowa, 
as one by one these States have been able to assume self-support. From the 
fields of these Auxiliaries, the American Home Missionary Society 
always has, and always must, derive the principal part of its funds for 



50 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



June, 




1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 51 

prosecuting - the national work. Upon their cordial co-operation its life 
depends. 

The map accompanying this article shows that by far the larger 
portion of our country is as yet, entirely or in part, dependent upon the 
National Society for help. With the single exception of Iowa, all of 
the region west of the Mississippi, together with Northern Wisconsin, 
Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, 
Georgia and Florida, or more than throe fourths of the area of our 
country, exclusive of Alaska, with a population of over 30,000,000, look to 
the American Home Missionary Society for help in rescuing the perish- 
ing. Nor does this include several of our southern States, with more 
than 7,000,000 people, where as yet this Society has been able to do 
little if any work. 

The most of this great and growing and needy region, as will be seen 
by the map, is subdivided into districts with a Home Missionary Super- 
intendent over each. These Superintendents are the Society's chief 
representatives at the front. To them are largely intrusted its sacred 
interests, and the economical and effective prosecution of its work. 
Upon no class of men in our country to-day, do mightier responsibilities 
rest, than upon these Superintendents. Their movements affect the 
whole movement of the churches in their fields. They touch the springs 
that set in motion influences which reach into the future. They secure 
recruits for, and marshal the forces that are steadily advancing in the 
name of the Lord, to conquer the land for Christ. Faithful and true 
and tried, they stand as the representatives of the churches as well as 
of the Society, doing a work which the future historian will acknowledge 
as among the chief factors in civilizing and saving America. Like Paul, 
in labors abundant, in journeyings often, in Aveariness and painfulness, 
in patchings and hunger and thirst and cold and fastings, they also, like 
Paul, have the care of all the churches. 

Christians in the East, acquaint yourselves with these men. Learn 
their plans, their needs, their hopes, their fears. " Bear ye one an- 
other's burdens." See to it that these Superintendents, and all your 
missionaries at the front more fully feel that they are only the repre- 
sentatives of a great host of men and women whose hearts the Lord has 
touched. Pray for them individually. Come into closer contact and 
more vital and practical sympathy with your work and your workers, 
and ere you are aware, from earth to heaven, and from heaven to earth, 
will echo the shout of triumph, " His Kingdom is come, His will is 
done, His dominion is from sea to sea, and from the river unto the ends 
of the earth. "—Rev. O. C. Otis. 



Fresh Facts and Figures. — "The Missionary Star," ought to be 
placed in the hands of every Sunday-school scholar and church member 
throughout the land. — Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Oberlin, O. 



52 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 



THE FIRST BOHEMIAN CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 

Wednesday, March 28, 1888, a council of Congregational churches 
of Cleveland and vicinity met at the Bethlehem Bohemian Mission 
Chapel in Cleveland, for the purpose of organizing the First Bohemian 
Congregational Church. The week previous an examining com- 
mittee of Cleveland pastors and laymen, who had heen invited by the 
Cleveland Bohemian Mission Board to prepare the way for the couucil, 
had examined fifty-eight candidates for admission to the church. Rev. 
G. R. Leavitt, D.D., conducted the examination, which was very 
thorough. At the close of the examination, which lasted into the night, 
the members of the committee expressed themselves as exceedingly 
delighted with the result. Although a number of the candidates were 
requested to defer joining the church, because the evidence of piety they 
gave was not satisfactory, by far the greater number gave such proof of 
earnestness, and of a change of heart, and such clear and delightful 
testimonies were given of personal faith in Christ, and complete conse- 
cration to his service, that the committee felt fully convinced that the 
time had come to organize a church at Bethlehem. The council ac- 
cepted the report of this committee (which that afternoon examined several 
more persons) and in the evening proceeded to form the church which, 
with two members received at the communion season the following Sun- 
day, numbers fifty-six. Of these, fourteen are English-speaking, one a 
Pole, and the rest Bohemians. The services of recognition of the new 
church were in both languages, the singing being also in both languages 
simultaneously. Rev. Dr. J. H. Sturtevant was moderator of the coun- 
cil, and Rev. Dr. G. R. Leavitt, Rev. Messrs. Pasco of Garretteville, 
Henry M. Tenney, J. G. Fraser and others took part. Notwithstand- 
ing the storm, a goodly number, besides those who were to be formed 
into a church, were present. 

On Easter Sunday morning the communion was administered in 
both languages, and it was an occasion of great interest to all, especially 
to those who remembered the very small beginnings of the mission, and 
who knew, and had been made to feel most deeply, the difficulties that 
sometimes made success seem almost impossible. One of the chief 
difficulties in the way has been the Old Country state-church idea that 
baptism and confirmation, administered without regard to the state of 
heart, are sufficient to constitute one a Christian, and make one eligible 
to church membership. Then there were prejudices ; the ignorance of 
evangelical truth, and superstitions of the Catholic population, as well 
as the hatred and strong opposition of the large unbelieving and infidel 
element. As we looked upon that Easter assembly gathered in Bethle- 
hem Church to commemorate at once the dying love and the resurrec- 
tion glory of Christ, and saw among them the aged grandmother who 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 53 

had come a long distance that she might once more, after many years' 
deprivation, receive the elements administered to her in her own lan- 
guage, and the boy, Catholic-bred, converted in Bethlehem Sunday- 
school ; as we saw the deacons consecrated to their important services, — 
one from the Green Mountains, and the other a born Catholic from 
Bohemia,— and then when we heard the anthem of praise sung by the 
choir of young Bohemians, and looked into the faces of faithful and 
successful Sunday-school teachers, who had been converted in connec- 
tion with this work, and had then devoted themselves to teaching and 
saving others, our hearts overflowed with gratitude and praise ; and one 
chief reason for thankfulness was the patience, perseverance, and faith, 
with which the Congregational churches of Cleveland, of Ohio, and of 
the whole country have carried on this work, till permitted to see such 
blessed fruit. Henceforth no one can rationally doubt the possibility of 
reaching the Bohemians of our country with the Gospel. The success 
of this work is assured. If we pursue it with faith and patience, we shall 
reap a glorious harvest — of which this Bethlehem Church is the earnest 
and first fruit. 



THAT GROUND-HOG SKIN. 

The February issue of The Home Missionary contained the fol- 
lowing : 

" The southern mail brought a curious looking package to the Bible 
house last week, addressed ' To the Editor of The Home Missionary. 9 
The mysterious arrival proved to be a ' pelt' ; but the source of the 
contribution and the species of animal thus represented, were matters 
of speculation, until a later mail brought the following from a home 
missionary pastor in an isolated field at the South : 

" The person who sends you this skin is a very poor woman, and the 
mother of a large family. She made a profession of religion last August. 
One Sabbath I presented the cause of Home Missions in our little 
church. This woman was present and seemed greatly distressed be- 
cause she could add nothing to the collection. The next time I called 
at her house, she met me with a smiling face, and said, ' When you took 
that collection for Home Missions, I did feel dreadfully because I had 
nothing to give. I have something now! Yes, I've got a ground-hog 
skin for you. I skinned him and tanned the skin with my own hands! 
I have done it on purpose to give to you foi my collection. Will you 
take it ?' she said, anxiously. 'Certainly, I will,' I hastened to reply ; 
' and may God bless you !' Now, can you turn this woman's gift into 
gold for the Lord's treasury?' 



U THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

" Alas, this good man knows not what he asks! The day has gone by 
when a * chestnut' will yield bank bills ; when earrings, finger-rings, pins, 
or ornaments of any kind, can be forced to add to the treasury of our 
benevolent societies a tithe of their worth to the owner. 

"As to this earnest woman and her novel gift, He who still sits over 
against the treasury will accept the act of one who has done" ' what she 
could.' In his own way he will bless her in her spiritual life, and en- 
able her to become a light to some one now sitting in darkness, possibly 
at her very door." 

Not long after the publication of the above item, the Illinois mail 
brought a letter : 

"Dear Home Missionary. — Your brief notice of the ground-hog 
pelt interested me, the more so as it seemed to be written under the 
dual influences of fear that it was another 'chestnut,' and the faith 
that Christ would own it, in at least blessing the giver. 

" It was the first offering of a poor Christian woman, soon after her 
conversion, to the treasury of the A. H. M. S. I enclose you 15. Let 
this give me temporary ownership, and if there are other responses, let 
each successive contributor, regardless of the amount, whether it be 
ten cents or ten dollars, become, in turn, temporary owner, until the 
giving ceases. Let the last owner say how it shall be disposed of. I 
have faith that this may be a growing chestnut. 

" Did the Holy Spirit suggest the gift, did he lead the good mission- 
ary in faith to forward it, did he give the peculiar wording of the edi- 
tor's notice, has he moved my heart and pen? If so, he will move other 
hearts. Let us watch ! — Yours in hope, Philo. ,> 

The next message comes from a Vermont pastor, who writes : 

" I make this offer for the skin because I have a vivid remembrance 
of a time when I was on a farm, some twenty years ago. Being short 
of money, and behind time in paying my subscription towards the 
support of our pastor, I offered him, as a part of my payment on his 
salary, some good, bright, Vermont .spring wheat, which I had raised 
myself. He declined it on the ground that it was not good enough for 
use in his family. When I commenced preaching fifteen years ago, I 
said, " If a man has nothing else to pay, and offers me his dog, in good 
faith, I'll accept it, if I have to kill the dog next day!" 

The third letter upon this subject comes from a pastor in Ohio. 
Both contributors accept the plan proposed by " Philo." We will hold 
this "Missouri Pelt Fund" open until February, 1889, and then make 
a final report of the amount contributed to the treasury by one "who 
hath done what she could." 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY 55 



WYOMING RANCHES. 

BY REV. C. M. SANDEHS, SUPERINTENDENT. 

" Lots of room in this western wild," says the stranger as he crosses 
the plains. Yes, that is so, but the " Great American Desert/' about 
which we used to study, is fast losing its identity as such. Wyoming's 
beckoning finger has caught the eye of the moving masses everywhere, 
and a great tide of immigration is crowding this way. Eailroads are 
pushing in, and new communities are springing up. The valleys are 
being peopled. The wealth of the hills is being developed, and it will 
not be many years before this Territory will be asking of the nation 
that she may become a State. 

" I thought Wyoming was a vast howling wilderness," says one. 

" What is there, to attract anybody ?" asks another. 

Many people have very crude ideas of this " Great New West." 
It may interest the readers of the The Home Missionary to know 
something of the ranches of one of our large live stock corporations. 

The other morning Mr. W. W. Gleason, a Massachusetts man, now 
general manager of the Warren Live Stock Company, Cheyenne, called 
at the parsonage and invited me to spend the day with him among some 
of their ranches. His team of half-breed bronchos hitched to a Stude- 
baker wagon was at the gate, and anxious to be on the go. The invita- 
tion was accepted, and soon the city was behind us, and we were pushing 
over the swells to the southwest. On the way, we met a Texas steer 
which had strayed from a herd. The brute faced us. His horns were 
long, sharp, and gracefully curved. His eyes were like balls of fire. 
Not a desirable fellow to meet, were one afoot and alone. After a ride 
of several miles we came to the top of a swell, or hill, where was opened 
to our view the beautiful valley of " Lone Tree Creek," stretching for 
miles from the northwest to the southeast. The bottoms were waving 
with grass ready for the mower. A few cotton-wood trees, not very 
mighty, stood, like sentinels, along the banks of the creek. Several 
ranches were in sight. The buildings for the most part were unpre- 
tentious, usually made of logs, and surrounded by fenced yards for 
stock. 

'Soon we were in the valley, and made our first call at the Terry 
Ranch. This is the headquarters for the horses of the company. The 
house is located in the valley near the creek. It is a comfortable and 
quiet home. A good well of sweet water near the kitchen door, fur- 
nishes that which is best fitted to quench one's thirst. Here live a 
family and the men employed on the place. A short distance north 
are the stables and yards for horses. In the stables you find seventeen 
blooded animals whose average. value is estimated at one thousand dol- 



56 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



June, 




1888. Til E HOME Ml SSI OX ART. 57 

lars each. After an hour here we went on to the Valley Ranch, the 
headquarters of the company, where we enjoyed a good dinner for which 
our morning ride had duly prepared us. After satisfying the inner 
man, we retired to the comfortable quarters of the general manager, 
and asked for information concerning this stock organization, and were 
told that its capital stock is five hundred and sixty thousand .dollars. 
The president, for whom the company is named, is the Ex-Governor of 
the Territory. Gov. Warren came from the Berkshire hills of the Bay 
State a few years ago, bringing his capital stock mainly in his head. 
I have been told that he once drove a milk wagon, and that he reached 
the factory village sufficiently early in the morning, to furnish the 
operatives with fresh milk for breakfast ; and they went to work 
at six o'clock ! Though a young man still, Gov. Warren is one of the 
first men of Wyoming, and is at the head of one of the largest mercan- 
tile firms in the Territory. The vice-president is Hon. M. E. Post, our 
recent delegate to congress. Mr. Post is president of the M. E. Post 
Bank, and also one of the partners in the " Post Percheson Horse Com- 
pany, which owns three thousand horses. Mr. Post is one of the solid 
men of Cheyenne, and has made himself what he is largely by his in- 
dustry and skill. The secretary and treasurer, who is also general mana- 
ger, is Mr. W. W. Gleason, who came to Cheyenne three years ago. at 
the request of the Governor to take charge of this w r ork. Mr. Gleason 
is specially fitted for the work, is thoroughly conversant with live stock, 
and under his skillful management, this large concern is worked vigor- 
ously and successfully. 

On their fourteen ranches the company own 2,400 horses, 4,000 head of 
cattle, mostly cows, and 70,000 sheep ; 15,000 of these are this year's lambs. 
55,000 sheep w'ere sheared last year. The shearing is done by contract. A 
company of shearers employing twenty-five or more men, take contracts 
in Wyoming, Mexico, California, and Australia. They took the contract 
to shear 45,000 sheep in thirty days, for six cents a head. This puts 
the wool into the sacks ready for shipment. The company owning 
sheep, furnish strings and sacks, and board the men, making total cost, 
seven cents a head. These shearers are experts in the business. I timed 
one fellow. He took the wool from a sheep in one minute and forty- 
five seconds. They do not cut so close, however, as your eastern 
farmer. Some bucks yield thirty pounds of w r ool. From this lot they 
expect to ship 225,000 pounds of wool. As to the manner of herding, — 
in winter they are divided into flocks of from two to three thousand 
each. A man and a dog go with each flock. They are kept out all 
day, but housed at night. In summer, they are put into bands of from 
six to ten thousand, and are sent out to the more distant ranges, possibly 
among the foot-hills, and kept out night and day, under the care of 
three men, who take with them a camping outfit, a wagon, a pair of 
horses, and two or three shepherd dogs. 



58 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

The company cut 2,500 tons of hay, and the haying is done by con- 
tract. The grass is cut, put into stacks, and measured after thirty 
days for $1.75 cents per ton. "This grass," said Mr. Gleason, "prop- 
erly cured, will fat cattle, equal to New England hay with corn meal 
added. It yields three tons to the acre.'"' 

Something is done in the way of agriculture, but not on quite such 
an extensive scale as the live stock business. Twenty-five acres are 
given to potatoes, which are supposed to yield 3,000 bushels of splendid 
specimens. 

The working force of the company consists of five families, and fifty- 
seven men. Do any of these men care for books ? I noticed on the 
table, the following among others : Appleton's Chemistry, Hygiene 
for Young People, The Home at Greylock. A district school is near 
by, and the teacher is a young lady from New York City. There are 
ten scholars. Near the building a horse was grazing, and I noticed a 
gig. Some of the children come five miles with that rig. 

It was three o'clock when we started for home. On the way we 
passed through the meadows, where a flock of spring lambs were feed- 
ing, and called at Willow Springs Ranch, where a gang of the shearers 
were at work. It was a lively sight — one not soon to be forgotten. We 
reached home in season for tea, having had an experience that strength- 
ened our faith in the future of Wyoming. 



FROM A SWEDISH MISSIONARY. 

The Lord is my Shepherd. During the past year I have preached 
195 sermons, held 59 prayer-meetings, and made 245 calls. I have 
traveled hundreds of mile by rail, buggy, lumber wagon, and on foot. 
You know in Western Minnesota you may travel hundreds of mile and 
scarcely meet any but Scandinavians. In the great fields I have sown 
the Gospel the past year. I have seen many souls converted to Christ 
this year, and according to God's promise they shall grow. 

Whatever else you may do the poor farmers need the Gospel, and 
God will surely reward every one in due time who are trying to win souls 
for Christ. If the new settlers are neglected, you may not have hope 
for their children. A church should have as little aid as possible for to 
support the minister. More the church pay for their minister, more 
they appreciate. Let the minister's salary be enough to support his 
family, that he may give his whole time to the ministry. When his salary 
is too small to keep his family then he must take time to do work which 
does not belong to him, and the church under his care will not prosper. 

Superintendent Hood says in The Home Missionary for November, 
" While traveling in North Wisconsin I stopped in a town at a minis- 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 59 

ter's house where they had for supper, bread, butter and prunes; for 
breakfast, milk toast and fried potatoes. Do you suppose I could preach 
every night and visit all day on such a diet ?" I could mention several 
ministers who never have any sauce of any kind, nor any meat for 
weeks in their homes, and have had to preach most every night. Eut after 
awhile their health have failed and they were obliged to give up preaching. 
I know a man in Nebraska who devoted several years to preach the 
Gospel, lie had to resign, because his family got to be larger than his 
income, lie is now a prosperous business man, but devotes all his spare 
time freely to the church. I fear that many Swedish ministers will 
have to follow his example. 

My good Gospel horse took sick and died a few weeks ago. 



HOW TO HELP THE SCANDINAVIAN WORK. 

1. By sending more money to the American Home Missionary So- 
ciety for this work. If you wish it applied specially in this way, say so 
when you remit, and it will be so applied. For a year past this work 
has been severely crippled for want of means. "No wore new work," 
has been the instruction from, the Secretaries in Mew York to the super- 
intendent, made necessary by the debt of the Society, and the inade- 
quate means for enlargement. The order has been obeyed, but with 
deep regret. Many culls for help from unsupplied fields of the fullest 
promise, have been refused. 

Friends : When these northern races are pouring upon our shores 
a people who are hardy, prolific, eager, permanent, religiously inclined, 
responsive, and naturally preferring the freedom and fellowship such as 
is found in Congregational churches, is it wise to restrain and dwarf the 
Scandinavian work? The Christian patriot will take the hint. 

2. Help educate Scandinavian ministers. The need for an educated 
ministry, filled with the Holy Spirit, among these people is very great. 
Some of these students in Carleton College and Chicago Theological 
Seminary cannot keep on without a little help. Also, the Scandinavian 
departments in both these schools need endowment. Who, by endow- 
ing a prof essorship in one of these schools, will furnish enduring stepping 
stones by which these vigorous races may walk upward? 

3. Help the work in Norway. The Free Evangelical churches in 
Norway are almost at a stand-still with discouragement for the want of 
a little help to employ general missionaries. We are their natural allies. 
It would cheer them greatly to be thus encouraged by their stronger 
brothers, and we should soon see the fruits returning to our own shores. 

4. Have a missionary concert on "The Scandinavians." It is a 
theme brimful of interest. 



GO 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



June, 



Full information about the religious situation and work among the 
Scandinavians is furnished in the following publications by the Ameri- 
can Home Missionary Society, 34 Bible House, N. Y. : "Wind from 
the Holy Spirit in Sweden and ^Norway"; "The Work Among the 
Scandinavians;" "Sunday-school Concert Exercise — The Scandinavi- 
ans." — Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Minneapolis, Minn. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

Year ending April 1, 1888. 

Fifty-nine churches have resolved to try and support themselves 
without further aid from the Society. The Pastors whose names are 
given were with the churches at the time of attaining to self-support. 



Org. 

1885 

1881 



1864 
1837 

1872 
1859) 
1858 \ 
1875i 
1848) 

1873 
1882 
1858 

1872 



1876 

1885 

1873 
1873 

1871 
1886 
1866 
1872 
1885 
1886 
1880 
1863 



Pennsylvania. Self-support. 

.Wilkesbarre (Puritan Ch.) Rev. Frederick Gwynne Feb. 16, 1888. 

District op Columbia. 

.Washington (Tab. Cb.) Rev. William C. Sec-field. . .Oct. 1, 187T. 

Michigan. 

.Shelby Rev. Thomas Parker May 9, 1887. 

.Otsego " J. B. Chaplin Oct. 1, 

.Cheboygan " William T. Bugbey. . .Nov. 1, " 

. Cauandaigua and Morenci. . . . " Henry Coate Jan. 1, 



.Prattville and Ransom. 



Robert Gordan Apr. 1, 



Minnesota. 



. Worthington Rev, 

.St. Paul (Pacific Ch.) " 

. Cottage Grove " 

.Fersms Falls " 



David Henderson July 20, 

Enion C. Evans Apr. 15, 

William Gill July 1, 

CharLes E. Page Mar. 1, 



Kansas. 

.Stockton Rev. Floyd E. Sherman May 1, 

.Wichita (Plymouth Ch.) " Joseph H. Parker Sept. 15, 

Nebraska. 
.Franklin Rev. Charles S. Harrison 



1887. 

1888. 

1887. 



.Liu wood . 
. Scribner . . 

.Eagle 

.Columbus 
.Albion . . . 



Milo J. P. Thing. . 
Marvin B. Harrison 
William S. Hills. . 
Orthello V. Rice. . 
Everett S. Chandler 



(Third and Saratoga Chs.) " Alfred B. Pennimau 



.Genoa 

. Greenwood 



U. C. Bosworth 

Herman A. French. 



Mar. 1, 
May 1. 
June 26, 
Sept. 1, 
" 9, 
Dec. 1, 



Jan. 1, 1888. 



JSSS. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



61 



1882 
1888 
1 885 
1872 

1877 

1883 
1881 

1886 
1879 

1S87 

1868 
1882 
1874 

1886 
1881 
1885 

1883 
1871 
1853 
1844 



1858 

1883 
1855 

1876 
1875 

1868 

1875 
1S70 
1855 
1^87 
1845 
1869 
185S 

1883 



Nebraska. — Continued. 
Wymore Rev. Jacob V. Dimon Jan. 1, 1888. 



.Cambridge 

.Grafton (German Ch.). 

.Plymouth 

."West Hamilton 



Amos N. Dean Feb. 1, 

John Lich Mar. 1, 

Daniel E. Hathaway. . .Apr. 1, 
John IT. Embrec " 



Noimi Dakota. 

.Grand Forks Rev. Arthur L. Gillett 

.Valley City " Thomas Sims 

South Dakota. 

.Huron (German Ch.) Rev. II. L. Thalberg 

.Watertown " Richard H. Battey. . . 

. Bowdle " William Macready . . . 

North California. 

.Oakland (Second Ch.) Rev. Walter S. Hamlin. . . . 

.Fresno " J. Spencer Voorhees. . 

.Tulare " William D. Williams. 

South California. 
. Pomona Rev. Charles B. Sumner. . . 



.National City " 

.Los Angeles (Vernon Ch.). ... " 

Oregon. 

. Cor vallis Rev. 

.East Portland " 

.Albany " 

. Oregon Citv . . . : " 



Edward P. Weage. 
Richard A. Field ! . . 



.Jan. 1, 1888. 
. Mar. 15, " 

.Oct. 1, 1887. 
. " 6, " 
. " 23, " 

.Aug. 1, 1887. 
.Feb. 12, 1888. 
.Apr. 1, " 

.Oct. 1, 1887. 
.Apr. 1, 1887. 
.Jan. 1, 1888. 



George II. Lee 

Daniel Staver 

Henry V. Rominger. . 
George A. Rock wood. 



.Mar. 1, 1887. 

.Oct. 1, " 

.Nov. 1, " 

.Dec. 1, " 



AUXILIARY STATES. 



Vermont. 

.Hj'de Park (North) Rev. Azro A. Smith May 1, 

New York. 

.Utica (Plymouth Ch.) Rev. DwightE. Marvin Oct. 1, 

. Friendship " Matthew Gaff ney Apr. 1 , 

Ohio. 

.Etnaville Rev. William Lewis Jan. 1, 

Illinois. 
. Emington Rev. Mead A. Kelsey Jan. 1, 

Iowa. 

. Belle Plaine Rev 

. Belmond 



.Avoca 

.Montour 

.Washta 

. Ei Idy ville 

.Cincinnati 

. Jamestown 

Wisconsin. 
. Sturgeon Bay Rev. ( ! aoraje W. Prescott 



Charles II. Bissell lune 1, 

John D. Sands Sept. 1 , 

Morris D. Hartsough . . Nov. 1, 
William II. Barrows. . .Feb. 1, 

Lucius R. Fitch " 

Laroy S. Hand Apr. 1, 

Chester C. Humphrey. Apr. 1, 
John A. Brown " 



1887. 

1887. 
1888- 

1888. 

1888. 
1887. 



1888. 



.Oct. 1, 1887. 



62 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 



GOOD NEWS. 

From Washington Territory. — Through the special influence of 
the Holy Spirit, a sermon preached last Sabbath went home to the heart 
of a young man, of twenty-two years, and son of one of our deacons. 
At the Thursday evening meeting, he asked us to pray for him. After 
the meeting he came to me and said, " I want to be a Christian. I 
can't hold out any longer." We walked home together. When op- 
posite his house he said, "Will you come in, and have another little 
prayer-meeting with me?" Of course I went in with him. We sang, 
read the Scriptures, and prayed together until midnight. While thus 
engaged he accepted Christ. The old deacon fell on the neck of his 
son, and kissed him, weeping tears of joy. A scene like this makes one 
forget the care and toil of home missionary life. If the joy on earth is 
so great, what will the fullness of joy be, in eternity! — Rev. J. Davies, 
Pullman. 

From Dakota. — When we came here in December, we found five 
professing Christians in a town of ninety inhabitants. There was one 
drug-store, which was a toll-gate to perdition, and two saloons. Three 
fourths of the men of the town, over fifteen years of age, spent every 
leisure moment at the gambling tables. As a nucleus we had a few 
earnest workers, living from one to seven miles away from the town. 
We made three separate efforts to begin a series of meetings, and were 
prevented each time by blizzards, and extreme cold weather. But, 
trying to be patient in tribulation, and awaiting God's time, we 
finally secured the assistance of our General Missionary, Rev. D. R. 
Tomlin, and held a four weeks' meeting. During the last service, 
several were on their feet, asking the prayers of Christian people, while 
nearly the whole audience stood with them as witnesses of God's free 
salvation. The saloons are closed, and their keepers have disappeared. 
Last Sabbath, forty new members, happy in their first love, were added 
to the church. A Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor has 
been organized. The moral sentiment of the town has undergone an 
entire change. The Devil can hardly muster a quorum for his card- 
tables. Two men who have made a business of playing the violin for 
public dances, have been soundly converted, and are hard at work for 
Christ. They have been instrumental in bringing in some life-long 
infidels. Spiritualists, Moralists, and Universalists are busily studying 
their Bibles to see " if these things be so," — and now the cry is heard, 
" We must have a church building !" We have already subscribed $800, 
and expect soon to make it more. This, with help from the Church 
Building Society, will give us a comfortable little church, where we may 
worship God. All this in the face of our extreme poverty. When God 
works, none can hinder. In Brother Tomlin, the Society have certainly 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. G3 

a workman who should be kept upon the field at any price. The 
special blessing of God rests upon his labors. In six months, more than 
one hundred and fifty souls have been led, through his efforts, from 
darkness into light. — Rev. G. J. Battey, Canova. 

From Kansas. — A young lady who sings in our choir, has taken a 
decided step for Christ. She is the daughter of the wealthiest citizen 
in our county, a bright, cultured, and promising young lady of about 
twenty years. Her parents have had little sympathy for Christian work 
and life. After this young lady had made an open profession of her 
faith, I called upon her mother with the intention of broaching the 
subject to her and informing her of her daughter's decision for Christ. 
I knew she needed some one to do this for her under the circumstances. 
I expected to be politely received, but not cordially. I opened the sub- 
ject at once, and when the mother learned of her daughter's decision, 
she broke down and wept, saying " There must be a change in this 
household ; I think I am willing to take that step myself." I then 
talked to her about the necessity of a change, and presented Christ as 
the helper and Savior. Since then the daughter has been baptized, 
and has united with the church, and the other members of the family 
are in attendance upon divine service every Sunday. I am sure the good 
Master is opening more than one door for us, and Ave are ready to enter. 
The ladies of the church conduct a daily prayer-meeting, and some who 
have never said a word in public have been induced to confess Christ. 
Quite a number are offering special prayer for the conversion of their 
husbands. Our Sabbath-school is prospering under efficient officers and 
teachers. The newly elected teachers pledge themselves to the follow- 
ing conditions : I am a Christian. I will study the lesson faithfully. 
I will attend the teachers' meetings if possible. I will visit each scholar 
in my class. I will attend each Sabbath, or send a substitute. 

"We have not yet received a communication from any one with respect 
to aid for a bell for our church. I do wish some one who is able might 
help us in securing a bell. How it would increase the attendance at 
our services ! The church is situated in a part of the town in which 
there is no other. This would be a profitable investment for some one 
who desires to use his money for the cause of Christ. — A Home Mis- 
sionary. 



Rev. "\T. B. Gray, Lake Henry, Dak., solicits second-hand Sunday- 
school books, with which to replenish the shelves of his "Exchange 
Library." He puts the books into as good condition as possible, and 
loans them to a destitute home missionary Sunday-school. When read, 
the} 7 are returned for repairs, and sent from one school to another as long 
as they hold together. 



04 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

A LETTER FROM TURKEY. 

BY REV. B. M. COLE, BITLIS, TURKEY IN ASIA. 

Though not having met in the flesh, a worker in distant Asia 
wishes to send greetings over the seas to your beloved Society, not alone 
for its sake and the noble work it is seeking to accomplish for our dear 
country, but because of the sad news to us personally, from Walla "Walla, 
Washington Territory. 

In our late war, when rebels were pushing on defiantly towards the 
Capitol, came the crushing news to my classmate that his brother had 
fallen in defense of his country. The sorrowing one at once sent back, 
speeding over the wires to the company, the words, " Captain, take me 
in brother's place!" Similar feelings well up within us to-day as we 
hear that your General Missionary, Rev. X. F. Cobleigh, of Walla Walla, 
has dropped out of the ranks of the too few noble workers in the distant 
Northwest. A whole army of immortal souls is in danger to-day as 
they cross swords upon a plain where Satan holds such defiant sway! 
The fight is raging in a conflict quite too unequal. 

The cry went out for volunteers for the Northwest, and our brother 
was quick to respond, though leaving an inviting field in Vermont, and 
when almost ready to decide in favor of the foreign field. Since then 
responses from others have been more frequent, and we had begun to 
hope that the field would be duly manned. But alas, that the delin- 
quency appears in another quarter, and where, least of all, we ought to 
expect it. How the States and towns did rally around our flag in the 
dark days of the war! How the bounties were rolled up, individuals 
being willing to part with their thousands, if they might but put their 
substitutes into the field! See brave hearts waiting about recruiting 
offices, eager to put down their name to fight for home and liberty! 
But no less eager and to be commended were those that gave the boys 
in blue such a send-off, backing it up all the way along with every 
possible support, as the conflict thickened about them. 

But the case of the Church and its workers to-day, is quite another 
affair, — a matter of secondary importance. Must liberty be counted the 
corner stone of .our republic, while God and his Church hold a second 
place? Messages of our chief magistrates do not read like this, nor did 
the conduct of our pilgrim fathers correspond to it, when they magnified 
so much the Church and religious education. If such be not true, why 
must our missionary societies plead loud and long for the necessary 
facilities to turn back this current of irreligion that threatens one of 
the fairest countries the sun shines upon ? We foreign workers have 
been much encouraged by seeing so many offering themselves for mis- 
sionary service. But what must be the effect upon us all, when we see 
this lack of financial support! We read in our dear brother's last 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 65 

earthly missive that he was trying to carry extra burdens, including 
financial — because of your embarrassed treasury, and it aggravates our 
sorrow to know that be fell in the harness, from overwork, lie was 
supplying churches here and then 1 which you had been unable to provide 
with pastors. He writes, " The condition of the treasury of the Ameri- 
can Home Missionary Society hinders the work. I am trying to help 
along several churches by preaching to them occasionally. Emigrants 
keep coming, and towns are growing, and new work has to be started, 
but so much must be left undone for want of funds. I shall put $200 
or more, into the work this year.'' Let churches think of this for a 
twelve months' contribution, when they allow the work to languish for 
want of funds. 

Obviously it is unbecoming me, one of the family, 'to speak of Mr. 
Cobleigh as a man and worker, to you who have followed his work the 
past live years. Suffice it to say, that his letters have read like veritable 
chapters from the foreign field. In place of our long horseback rides he 
has with his carriage and ponies driven up and down his great field 
thousands of miles in a few months, preaching daily to interested audi- 
ences, some of the time lodging in places where, if like us he did not 
have the purring old buffalo and braying donkey of the Orient, he was 
once at least aroused at night by a grunting old hog prowling about 
under his couch! " But," he says, " on the whole I find good food and 
as good beds as Paul slept on. I am happy in my work. I love to 
labor for the Master. Do not pity me. I am glad to toil." These 
words he wrote to his mother not long before he heard of her sndden 
death. When this sad news came he was about going into the pulpit, 
and he did not delay because of it, but spoke with such an unction of 
the Spirit that several conversions was the result. 

But he has gone now. You have lost a noble, devoted laborer, of 
comparative youth, and Ave a beloved brother. lie came home weary 
from overwork in his constant touring, and for the rest, let a malignant 
form of malarial fever tell the story. Gone — a robust and comparatively 
young man of so much esteem and promise in his field, and, as we fear, 
from overwork. Why do the churches fail to back up, as they should, 
their volunteers at the front in God's Army? May such a loss arouse 
them to the demands of duty. Oh, that 1888 might prove for finances, 
what 1887 was for missionary recruits ! We may not surrender an im- 
portant post in Turkey to take the place of him that has fallen, but we 
gladly forward our contribution to your treasury, while we pray the Lord 
to put it into the hearts of his people to abundantly replenish it, as a 
support and safeguard to the faithful workers that remain. 



Please send me 150 copies of " Fresh Facts and Figures," a leaflet 
that ought to be committed to memory by all Christians of our order in 
the land.-^-i?<?i\ A. W. Hazen, Middletoicn, Ct. 



GG THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

Suggestive. — By the way, did you ever hear the story of the deacon 
and the tramp? The deacon's heart was touched for the poor tramp, 
and he decided to give him a slice of bread. While cutting the bread 
it occurred to the deacon that he would minister to the spiritual, as well 
as the temporal necessities of his guest. So he asked him to repeat after 
him the Lord's Prayer. The deacon commenced: 

"Our Father," "Our Father," says the tramp. "Which art"— 
"Hold!" says the tramp. "Is God your father?" "Yes,"sciys the 
deacon. "And is he my father, too?" "Yes." "Then we are 
brothers." " Yes, that is so," says the deacon. 

"Well, then," exclaims the tramp, "if I am your brother, suppose 
you cut that slice a little thicker !" — A Home Missionary Superin- 
tendent. 



A Piece of Paper. — I was asked to go to a public house in Not- 
tingham to seethe landlord's wife who was dying. I found her rejoicing 
in Christ as her Savior. I asked her how she found the Lord. " Head- 
ing that," she replied, handing me a torn piece of paper. I looked at 
it, and found that it was a part of an American newspaper, containing an 
extract from one of Spurgeon's sermons, which extract bad been the 
means of her conversion. " Where did you find tliis newspaper?" I 
asked. She answered, "It was wrapped around a parcel sent to me 
from Australia !" Talk about the hidden life of a good seed! Think 
of that! A sermon preached in London, conveyed to America, then to 
Australia, part of it torn off for the parcel dispatched to England, and 
after all its wanderings, giving the message of salvation to that woman's 
soul! God's W T ord shall not return unto him void. — From an Evangelist. 



From a Germax Missionary. — I have had much trouble in my 
field Avith some members. They cannot be satisfied with other mem- 
bers. They sought always to find out the faults of others. They care 
not for their virtues. ISIow we have had a conference, and two mem- 
bers must go away. It is the conclusion of the church. I think our 
future for the next coming time, is good. I cannot go more to A. be- 
cause the people may not go again to the family in which we held our 
church, and another room is not yet here, because the other members 
are all bachelors, and have no house, and Avork in different place. 
There are many who will do nothing now for the work of Christ. A 
man has begun after my sermon, a fight, because he felt bad at me and 
could not be satisfied with my different thinks. I hope I may begin my 
church again in another house, and when they hear the Word, it shall 
be better. In B. is my congregation growing in,, and on the outside. I 
am glad, if only it is the work of God that is growing. May the Lord 
bless his work to its furtherance, and to the spreading of his name ! 



June, THE HOME MISSIONARY. 67 

W&ommVs gcpitvtmcut 



Words for Workers. — Even our Lord cannot seem to get on with- 
out some human means of love and prayer, and the more serious and 
grave the fight, the more he needs tears and wrestling from us. We 
must pray and pray until the tears come, and then he will assure us that 
He is with us, and will do all things right for us. He needs us so much 
thai lie never will waste our soul power, nor allow it to be spent in vain. 
The Lord is our friend ; this is true. He is with us ; this also is true. 
He is magnificent, tender, strong, and loyal to us. He is to be trasted 
to complete any work which we begin and find beyond our ability to 
carry on. When that work is not for ourselves, but for one more soul to 
be redeemed — one more trophy of his grace — he must, lie will see it to 
the glorious end. "I will call for the corn and increase it, and lay no 
famine upon you." — Mrs. S. B. Capron. 



OREGON AND WASHINGTON. 

A letter bearing the Oregon j^ostmark brought smiles of welcome 
to certain faces at the Bible House, last week. The following message 
will surely give courage to the hearts of those who are praying that the 
women organized for missionary work in our land may soon touch hands 
from ocean to ocean. 

" The Woman's Home Missionary Society for Oregon and Washington 
Territory is not recognized in your list of Woman's organizations. 
Why not f Simply because we have received no official report of the 
same, although we have looked in that direction these many months for 
such glad tidings. Welcome, thrice welcome to the sisterhood! ''In 
the name of our God we will set up our banners." 



CONNECTICUT. 



We have received the second annual report of the Woman's Con- 
gregational Home Missionary Union of Connecticut, for the year 
ending December, 1887. 

Officers. — President, Mrs. Francis B. Co'oley; Secretary and Reg- 
istrar, Mrs. Samuel M. Hotchkiss ; Treasurer, Mrs. W. W. Jacobs ; all of 
Hartford. There are three vice-presidents, an executive committee of 
twelve, and a finance committee. 



C8 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

The record before us shows marked progress in the methods and 
work of this working Union. At the beginning of the year a circular 
letter in the form of a "New Year's Greeting" was sent to every Con- 
gregational church in the State. It met with a cordial welcome, and 
brought in several new auxiliaries. To the fifteen auxiliaries of the 
first year, twenty were added during the second, and up to April the 
number had reached forty-four. One encouraging feature is an in- 
creasing demand for missionary literature. To knowledge, you may 
always add a more intelligent interest. This Union has extended most 
liberal and valuable assistance to the extreme frontier at the West, to* 
the mountain whites and freedmen of the South, to the Spanish in New 
Mexico and New York, to the Mormons in Utah, to the Bohemians in 
Cleveland, to Whitman College in Washington Territory, and to the 
Indians in Dakota. With intelligence flowing in from all these points 
we cannot wonder that the Union has steadily increased in power and 
influence, and that its treasury has doubled its record of the year before, 
having received up to March, 1888, over four thousand dollars. 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE WOMAN'S H. M. UNION OF CONNECTICUT. 

[Certain States without a Woman's Home Missionary Organization ask for some 
form of constitution by which such an organization may be formed. We will pie- 
sent from time to time the different State constitutions which have been successfully 
adopted, and which we trust will prove suggestive.] 

I. This organization shall be called the Woman's Congregational 
Home Missionary Union of Connecticut, and shall consist, in addition 
to the women named in the act of incorporation, of such women in the 
several Congregational parishes of Connecticut as have a friendly interest 
in Congregational home missionary work. 

II. Its object shall be to aid the work carried on by the several 
National Congregational benevolent Societies laboring for our own 
country, and the Missionary Society of Connecticut. 

III. Its officers shall be a president, one vice-president, or more, a 
registrar, a secretary, a treasurer, an auditor, a finance committee, and 
an executive committee, who shall be chosen annually, and shall con- 
tinue in office until their successors are chosen. The president, vice- 
presidents, registrar, and executive committee shall be chosen by the 
Union. The secretary, treasurer, auditor, and finance committee, shall 
be chosen by the executive committee. 

IV. The executive committee, of which the secretary and treasurer 
shall not be members, shall consist of at least fifteen, including the presi- 
dent and vice-presidents, of whom four shall be a quorum. They may fill 



jsss. TUB HOME MISSIONARY. 69 

vacancies in all offices ; may make their own rules, subject to the pleas- 
ure of the Union ; shall seek by such means as they deem best, or as 
are ordered by the Union, to secure auxiliaries, to obtain offerings, and 
generally to promote the object of the Union ; shall arrange for its 
meetings, and shall make an annual report. 

V. The Union shall hold an annual meeting at a time and place 
named by itself or by the executive committee, on notice issued by the 
president or secretary at least seven days before said meeting. 

V I. This constitution may be amended by a vote of two thirds pres- 
ent at any annual meeting, if the amendment has been proposed at a 
previous annual meeting, or is recommended by the executive committee. 

Rules. 

1. The President shall consult the interests of the Union and pre- 
side at its meetings, and at the meetings of the Executive Committee. 

2. A Vice-President shall perform the duties of the President as 
occasion may require. 

o. The liegistrar shall keep the records of the Union. 

4. The Secretary shall be the Secretary of the Executive Committee, 
and shall keep their records and papers ; with the agreement of the 
President, shall call meetings of the Committee ; shall conduct corres- 
pondence ; shall supervise publications ; shall prepare the annual report 
for the Committee ; shall draw all orders on the treasury through the 
Treasurer ; shall avail herself of opportunities to give information in 
relation to forming auxiliaries ; and, in general, shall seek, at her dis- 
cretion, or as she may be ordered, the interests and object of the Union, 
and shall report annually to the Committee. 

5. The Treasurer shall take donations and bequests and give proper 
receipts therefor ; shall make to the Secretary at the close of each month 
.a detailed statement of the receipts during that month; shall give 
bonds, if required; and shall report to the Executive -Committee annually, 
:and oftener if required, the receipts and disbursements, and the property 
in hand. 

G. The Auditor shall examine the accounts of the Union, including 
those of the Secretary and Treasurer, and report annually, or oftener if 
required, to the Executive Committee. 

7. The Finance Committee shall advise the Treasurer as may be 
necessary ; shall examine annually, or oftener as occasion may require, all 
the property of the Union ; shall consult its financial prosperity ; and 
shall report annually to the Executive Committee. 

8. Offerings shall be applied according to the will of the donors. 
Offerings without designation shall be applied as ordered by the Execu- 
tive Committee. 



70 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

9. A local organization of women in Connecticut may be an aux- 
iliary of the Union by paying five dollars annually for that purpose ; 
and, as such, it will be expected to report annually to the Secretary. 
The payment of twenty dollars constitutes an individual a Life Member 
of the Union. 

10. These rules may be amended by a vote of two thirds of those 
present at any meeting of the Union. 



A PERPLEXED TREASURER. 

What can be done to raise money? I have racked my brains in 
vain, considering this plan and that, and now I do marvel that officers 
of benevolent societies ever attain to old age ! 

Some one suggested naively the other day that the best way of raising- 
money was to give it. Yet one might give all and it would be but a 
drop in the bucket. The calls are so many and so urgent, one feels in 
despair. I used to rest with a good deal of comfort upon tithes; but 
now it seems to me that the tenth is due, and it is only what we give 
beyond, that is a free-will offering to the Lord. In what style to live- 
how to treat one's self and one's family — how far to indulge tastes for 
beauty, art, etc., are puzzling questions. It is not with me how much 
I ought to spend, but how little is it policy or possibly duty to conform 
to the customs of the community. My ''cravings" are not for these 
indulgences as a general thing, but it is difficult to know how far it is 
right to abstain. 



Nebraska. — The "Woman's Missionary Association of Nebraska has 
given all its home missionary work to the Nebraska Woman's H. M. 
Union, and, as an auxiliary of the Woman's Board of the Interior, will 
limit its work hereafter to Foreign Missions. 



A Deserved Tribute. — The Kansas Telep/to)ie, while expressing 
sorrow at the loss of so able, consecrated, and effective a missionary 
organizer and leader as Superintendent Blanchard has proved himself 
to be, adds the following tribute to one with wbose pen we have become 
somewhat familiar in these pages: " We feel that it is not out of place 
to add that Brother Blanchard's resignation brought to the churches in 
Kansas a double loss, in the removal from us of 'the elect lady,' his 
wife, who had won the hearts of all the women of our churches who are 
working and praying for the cause of Christian missions." 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 71 

AN OUTBURST. 

I HAVE boon reading The Home Missionary, and am simply wretched! 
I know that some of the needs of our land are mot, but my soul is bur- 
dened by the terrible needs that we haven't met. The Words of those 
dcai-. patient workers at the front, touch my heart. There they stand in 
the thick of it, bravely fighting against all sorts of iniquity, opposition, 
and indifference, and there they will stand, until they fall in the harness; 
and what are we doing to help them? I must do something more. Inclosed 
please find my check for one thousand dollars. I know I can spare it 
if I " scrimp," and I do so want to help. If this country is to be saved, 
work must be done now — and much more of it. Yet our efforts will 
be for naught unless the Holy Spirit goes with the work, and moves 
the hearts. 

How powerless we are! I do feel so helpless when I think about 
those sin-cursed communities, and T wonder how God can delay his 
coming ! Then I feel so ashamed of myself, for if I were what he wants 
me to be, he could use me more to help on this work. If I ever reach 
heaven, I'm going to have a long talk with Moses. He was so patient, 
so forbearing in the midst of the evil, while I want to take right hold 
and upset things generally, to get them straightened out! Oh, for a 
spirit that will wait patiently upon God. 



A MESSAGE. 



Iroquois, Dakota, May, 1888. 

It is of no use to ask me to go to Saratoga this year. Tt gives me a 
big heart-ache to write these words. With the terrible pressure of work 
upon us in these two growing parishes and our various out-stations, I 
cannot again leave my husband to carry the burden alone. He has not 
recovered his full vigor since the wrestle with that awful blizzard. But 
oh. how T could enjoy those meetings ! My heart has been greatly 
comforted by the many requests from Christian friends to meet them 
there again, but there will be a larger gathering of God's people by and 
by, and through Christ, I do hope to be there, and look into the faces 
of those who have loved his precious cause here. 

My health has been poor of late. I have been too anxious about the 
debt on the church. But thank God, one of his own dear saints in 
Rhode Island has helped us pay that, and my appetite is already on the 
gain ! And now we are working for blinds on the Esmond Church to 
protect the windows from hail, a bell for the Iroquois Church, also a 
coat of paint, some horse -sheds, and an organ. But we've made up 
our minds not to run in debt. We are doing every thing Ave can to 
raise money, but it is a scarce commodity out here on the prairies. 



72 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

I must tell you about a curious Surprise Party. Mrs. Doane 
keeps house for her soldier son. She is about eighty years old, hut does 
her own work. She lives five miles west of Esmond. AVe were invited 
one cold, windy day to go with a party and surprise Mrs. Doane. AVe had 
a pleasant time, and a good supper. At the table a plate was passed for a 
collection. This was a " new wrinkle," but Mr. Drake put in a quarter. 
They said afterward, that my face was a study. I couldn't understand 
it at all. The collection amounted to fifteen dollars, and before I knew 
what was coming, Mrs. Doane was presenting it to me — in a nice little 
speech ! The presentation also included certain packages which had 
been brought there. Well, I, who had come to surprise Mrs. Doane, was 
the only surprised one in the company. 

Last Sunday we had service and Sunday-school here, then I went to 
Esmond and held service there, leaving Mr. Drake to conduct the 
evening meeting at Iroquois. Then I went to an out-station five miles 
from Esmond, where I remained all night. (lame home Monday morn- 
ing to find my house topsy-turvy. Two ministers had been keeping 
house while I was gone. Every mouthful of food in the house had 
been eaten. As a rule, ministers are not good housekeepers! Tired as 
I was, I had to go to work and clear tip to have a place to rest in. 

Our congregations are very large. Our Sunday-schools are the 
largest in the county. Our field has outgrown us. AVe must have help. 
These rapidly growing churches, and our out-stations, are too much for 
one couple. Oh, for more laborers! To-morrow I go to Canova, forty 
miles away, to help organize a " Ladies' Aid Society" there. They 
need a church and parsonage. We have had so much experience in 
this line that we are often invited to help plan. 

I shall be very impatient to hear from the Saratoga meeting. I 
know you will all be much interested in Mrs. Pickett's Pocky Mountain 
experiences. 1 pray that the Holy Spirit may be present in great power 
at that meeting to open the eyes of our dear sisters to the present need 
of consecration to the work of Christ, and incline their hearts to enter 
joyfully into the blessed service. — Mrs. A. J. Drake. 



Too True. — A little girl, who, with a playmate, had been through 
the town collecting money for missions, reported as follows : " Some 
were very pleasant to us;, some treated us badly,- and some gave us money 
just to get rid of us." 



A Nebraska pastor wants to thank the friend who sends him 
The "New Englander." He enjoys it exceedingly. AVhen he has read it 
he passes it on to a brother minister in a neighboring town. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 73 



<Duv %ouuq gcoplc. 



MISSIONARY NEWS. 

The " Easter Penny" plan has become very popular, and the children 
are making some shrewd and successful investments of pennies for mis- 
sions. One little fellow not a thousand miles from the Bible House, 
New York City, has become quite expert in converting laths into yard 
sticks, and even into pew racks. Miss Le Cato, who has been lending 
pennies in this vicinity, tells us of this boy, and also of a little girl who 
bought a penny's worth of darning cotton, and mends the family stock- 
ings at a penny a pair. 

In I)e Smetj Dakota, the superintendent of the Sunday-school has 
been distributing nickels, instead of pennies, which the children invested 
so well that they brought in $30.50 to the missionary fund. Two of 
these Dakota boys invested in lettuce seed, and another put his nickel 
into pease, which returned him five-fold. Little Clare gained one hun- 
dred per cent, selling radishes. A little girl bought six eggs, from 
these she hatched five chickens, two of which died, but she sold the 
remaining three for sixty cents. A lady bought a spool of thread, and 
sold the articles knit from it for thirty cents. Three business men in 
the Sunday-school formed a company, and invested their united capital 
in pins and hairpins. The returns from these were reinvested in flour. 
They reported at last 84.10. 

"Out on the prairie," says the missionary, Rev. J. R. Bonney, — 
" two miles from the town, is a family consisting of a father, mother and 
seven children. They live in a very plain house, wear plain clothing, 
eat plain food, and work very hard. The mother invested her nickel in 
turkeys' eggs, every one of which produced a "real live turkey," and 
she was able to return 84.15 from her nickel. Anna, the oldest daughter, 
raised squashes, and sold them for $1.25. Alice raised chfekens and 
sold them for 81, and Frank planted pop corn, and made eighty-five 
cents. Edwin peddled water-melons, and made 81.05, and finally, the 
six-year-old twins raised chickens and sold them for $1.50. "We had 
$9.80 from this one poor, hard-working family. What a help to the 
glorious cause, if there were more such families!" 



BANNER STATE THIS MONTH. 

In Contributions — Michigan. 

In Answers to Questions — Dakota. 



74 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



Jun< 




1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 75 



A MINING TOWN. 

We are sure that our boys and girls will be interested in this picture 
of a mining town away across the continent in Washington Territory. 
But a visit to the mine itself would, of course, be even more interesting. 
It seems strange enough to go down, down into the shaft hundreds of 
feet below the surface of the earth and there walk about through the 
great tunnels under the ground. Every now and then you will meet a 
miner going to or from his work with a little lamp in the top of his hat. 
The miners work night and day — not the same ones, of course, but part 
of them on the night "shift" and part on the day "shift," so that the 
work is constantly going on. As you pass along through the darkness, 
suddenly you hear a strange sound": " Get up there, go 'long," and the 
first you know you meet a boy and a donkey drawing a load of coal. 
The donkey draws the coal, but the boy does the encouraging. Just 
think of meeting a live donkey and a live boy hundreds of feet under 
ground! 

While sitting around our bright, cheerful coal-fires in the winter, 
how little we think of the thousands of men who spend their lives 
digging the coal out of the veins of the earth. The picture shows us 
the homes of some of these men. The houses do not look so very com- 
fortable outside, but you are sure to find many merry hearts within, 
unless you happen to call when they are under ground at work. By the 
side of the houses you will notice some stumps that are nearly as tall as 
the houses themselves. That is the way most of the trees are cut in that 
region, from six 10 ten or twelve feet above the ground. Some time 
we will tell you why this is done so, and how it is clone. 

On the hill in the center of the camp stands the little church. It 
was built almost entirely by the miners, and two or three years ago, they 
worshiped there every Sunday. Since then they have been without a 
pastor as they are not able to support one without help from the Home 
Missionary Society, and the Society has not been able to help them be- 
cause of a lack of funds. Nearly a hundred boys and girls meet in this 
little chapel every Sunday for Sunday-school. What a pity with all 
they have done, and are wiling to do for themselves, that they can not 
hear the Gospel preached, merely because they are poor and unable to 
support a pastor without help from Christians in the East! And yet 
there are more than a thousand just such places in our country to-day 
where no one is preaching the Gospel. 

Should Ave not be grateful to these miners who spend their lives in 
the cold and lampness and darkness under ground, that we may be 
comfortable in the winter? What a splendid thing it would be to show 
our gratitude by helping to send them the blessed Gospel of Christ! 



76 THE HOME MISSIONARY June, 

Should we not also be grateful to Him, who, for our comfort formed 
in the heart of the earth these great heels of coal, ages before we were 
born? Can we not also show our gratitude to Him by helping to send 
the Gospel of His dear Son to every mining camp in the world? — Rev. 
C. C. Otis. 



HARRY. 

My California Harry was as bright and lovable a boy as you often 
meet, but alas! his father was a drunkard. In spite of this, however, 
Harry became a Christian, and although only nine years old, he lived 
like a Christian. Harry's father was a doctoi', and he and his mother 
could remember a happy home where they had not known want. Harry 
was truly " Mamma's little man" and I have heard them talk over those 
happy days, while he helped her do the work, and watch the younger 
children who had known only poverty. I talked often to Harry's father 
about his bad habits, but it did not do any good. At last he went away 
and left his family altogether, and nobody knew what had become of 
him. The children could not come to Sunday-school for want of re- 
spectable clothing. The boys made fun of Harry, and the neighbors 
treated his mother very coldly. I never entered a more sorrowful and 
desolate home. 

But the father in his wanderings was followed by the prayers of a 
Christian mother long since dead. The Lord brought him to the "husks. " 
Ashamed of himself, he determined to return to his family. Once 
determined, his feet hastened. In three days he walked a hundred miles 
over the mountainous road. When exhausted he lay down, and slept. 
When he awaked he resumed his journey. So he came on, making no 
distinction between night and day. It was after midnight when he 
knocked at the door of his home, and called his wife by name. She was 
frightened at first; then she thought she had been dreaming. 

Harry came for me the next day, audi hastened over. "Mr. H," 
said the boy, breathless with energy and hope and joy, " Papa told me 
he wouldn't drink any more !" 

When we reached the house Dr. B. grasped me warmly by the hand, 
and begged me to talk with him. We had a long talk. He seemed 
broken down with true repentance, and sought forgiveness for his sins. 
We all knelt together, while this returning prodigal looked to his 
Heavenly Father for pardon and divine strength. 

When we were alone, the father told me that in the morning Harry 
had climbed on his knee, and lovingly laid his head on his shoulder ; 
for although that young face had been many a time shamefully bruised 
by the hand that should have protected him, the child had never ceased 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 77 

to love his father, As lie sat there upon his knee he said, " Papa, I 
want you to promise me something." " What is it, my hoy?" " I want 
you to get the Bible out of the trunk, and open it, and kiss it, and say 
vou won't drink ever again." " And this is the Bible," said the father, 
as he drew it from his pocket, while his eve glistened with resolution, 
as well as emotion. "Never will another day pass that I don't read .a 
chapter from it." The next night the wind was high, and the miserable 
house was partly blown over, so that they were left almost out of doors. 
"But," said the man, as he looked at the ruin, "strange as it may 
seem, 1 never had so happy a night! God's peace was in my heart!" — 
Rev. II. W. Houlding. 



A QUALIFIED COMPLIMENT. 

[We are indebted to Ilev. "W. G. Puddefoot for the following:] 

H , Mass. 

Bev. Mr. Puddefoot Dear Sir — I think you had the best sermon 
that I ever heard, but you must remember that I have not probably 
heard so many sermons as you have, for I am only 11 years old. 

1 intend to be a missionary, and go out to Neb. Mich. Indian Ter. 
or some other state or Ter. as you do. I dident say frontier because if 
places grow then as you said they have been growing, there wont be 
any frontier to go to. 

I wish you would write more in the home Missionary, for I imagine 
they would be pretty good to read Sunday afternoons, but I suppose you 
have enough without. 

Did you see while you was peaching your sermon or before I don't 
care which, three boys on your left hand side on the front seat? If you 
did the one in the farther corner was me. 

If you could, and have any of those small round paintings left I will 
send you ten cents and with papa, mamma, Mark, and Frank adding some 
to it, maybe you can send us one for we dident get a chance to get one 
Sunday. — With Jove, J. P.. T. 



QUESTIONS. 



48. Why did certain eminent ministers of New England go to 
Boston, Mass., Jan. 11, 1836? 

49. In what city was The American Home Missionary Society 
formed ? 



78 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

50. How many people came together to form it, and in what church 
did they meet? 

51. By what churches is this Society supported? 

52. Ought every Congregational church in the country to help 
support this Society? 

■ 53. Why? 

54. Does your church help? Ask your pastor. 

55. Define the word "auxiliary." 

56. What is a State auxiliary? 

57. How many State auxiliaries has this Society? 

58. Name the States. 

59. Where do you find these names? 

GO. What must a State do, to become an Auxiliary of The Ameri- 
can Home Missionary Society? 



American (Hollccjc and gducattou ^crcicttj. 

Rev. John A. Hamilton, D.D., Secretary. 
Rev. Theodore Y. Gardner, Western Secretary. 
James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer. 
10 Congregational House, Boston. 

[Money for the Society may be sent to James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer, No. 10 
Congregational House, Boston ; or to Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., 34 Bible 
House, New York.] 

Ax Ukgent Need. — During a single week in April upwards of 23,000 
immigrants from foreign lands came to our shores. It is not a new story 
—only the old one intensified — these, with the vast numbers still coming, 
go to make up the unconverted multitudes of our heterogeneous, swiftly 
increasing population. Is there an increase corresponding to this in the 
direction of proper educational and religious opportunities? It may at 
least be said that the public schools are doing much to meet the necessi- 
ties implied. The same may be affirmed in respect to the means of 
higher education. Churches too are springing up to keep pace with 
the rapid multiplication of villages and cities on our steadily advancing 
frontier. In our own denomination the gain in churches is at the rate 
of at least seventy a year. But the same cannot be said of the increase 
of ministers for the supply of those churches. The net gain of our 
ministers per year is less by fifteen than that of our churches. This 
includes all ministers, whether partially or liberally educated. That the 
question of ministerial supply, in the present and prospective condition 
of our church, is one that demands grave and prayerful consideration, 
will appear from the following extracts from an appeal from the Faculty 
of the Chicago Theological Seminary: — 



1SSS. 



Til E HOME MISSIONARY 



79 



Dear Brother : — We desire again to lay upon your heart the great 
need of more ministers, better trained ministers, ministers well grounded 
in our polity and loyal to it, and ministers able to preach the Gospel 
to the varied and multitudinous population of this great Northwest. 
The number of our students of theology is rapidly increasing, but 
is still far from keeping pace with the demand upon us. Were we 
to graduate seventy-five men a year they could all readily find fields of 
labor within the territory of the Seminary, not to speak of at least ten a 
year, who should go out from our Institution for work in the foreign 
fields. Will you not, therefore, make it a matter of special prayer and 
effort, to find at least one young man whom you can conscientiously and 
hopefully turn towards the study of theology? Is there not some student 
in college to whom you could speak or write, urging the claims of the 
ministry upon him? Is there not some boy of promise whom you can 
incline towards this service ? Has your church produced even one min- 
ister to preach the Gospel ? There is surely need that the responsibility 
of every congregation to provide men as well as money for spreading 
the knowledge of God should be pressed upon the conscience of Christian 
men. Will you not make at least one definite effort this year to increase 
the number of godly and learned ministers of the Gospel? 



appointments in ^pvtl, 1888. 



Not in commission last year. 

Aunks, Frank M., Mendon and Lennidas, Mich. 
Empson, George C, Sault Ste. Marie and Pine 

Grove, Midi. 
Haskell, Robert B., Guttenburg, N. J. 
Jenkins, John J., West Austiivtown, Ohio. 
Lineberry, William W., Hammond and North Side 

Mission, Ohio. 
Power, John G., Springview and Enterprise, Neb 

Ee-comm issioned. 

Barker, Peleg, Royal Oak, Mich. 
Beecher, Edward, D.D., Parkville, N. Y. 

Bunnell, John J., Bridgmfin, Sawyers and Mt. 
Talior, Mich. 

Chandler, Joseph, Lakeland, Minn. 

Cl.ipp, Cephas P., Oakland, Cal. 

Clayton, Thomas, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Cook, Charles II., Auburn, Cal. 

Corwin, Charles L., Park City, Utah. 

Uavies, David D., Mt. Cannef, Penn. 

Dilley, Alexander B., Lake Worth and Malabar, 
Fla. 

Ellis, Walter M., Mavville, No. Dak. 

Tales, Elisha P., Palestine, Tex 

Fifield, Charles W., Sand Bank, N. Y. 

Frickstad, Taral T., Raymond, Cal. 

Fuller, Edgar P., Mannfield, Snnnysidc and Oak- 
dale, Fla. 

Harrison, James. North Bend. Neb. 

Heckendorn, George M., Tomahawk, Wis. 



Herriek, Henry M., Winona, Minn. 

Hill, Emmett C. W., Columbia, So. Dak. 

Hoyt, Frederic V., Farmington and Endicott, East 
Wash. Ter. 

Hull, John II., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Johnson, Lorenzo C, Britt, Wesley and out-sta- 
tions, Iowa. 

Jones, William C, Crary's Mills, N. Y. 

Lewis, John T., Powell and vicinity. So. Dak. 

Lewis, W. H., Cherokee City, Ark. 

Lincoln, George E., Highland Station, Mich. 

Lund, Robert E., White Oaks, New Mex. 

McKee, James II., Little Valley, N. Y. 

Magill, Thomas, Reno, Nev. 

Medlar, William Henry, Crookston, Minn 

Merrill, Miss Sarah It," Cleveland, Ohio. 

Norris, Kingsley F., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Palm, Emanuel J., Christina Lake, Alexandria, 
Lake Ida, Holmes City and Maine, Minn. 

Partridge, Lewis C, Longwood and West Long- 
wood, Fla. 

Ralston, Edward S., Lincoln, Neb. 

Richards, Howard A. N.. Hampden, Ohio. 

Sutherland, Ward T., Ashland, Wis. 

Taylor, David P., Pescadero and Fairview, Cal. 

Taylor, Samuel, Lawrence and Hartford, Mich. 

Thrall, Homer, Columbus, Ohio. 

Todd, David E., Leona and Highland, Kan. 

Van Dvne, Johi> H., McAllister, Savannah and 
Coal Creek, Ind.Ter. 

Wirt, David, Arlington and Pasco, Or. 

Wurrschmidt, Christian W., Mitchell, Wartburg, 
Alpena and out-stations, So. Dak. 



80 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



June. 



Receipts in $p*U, 1888, 



MAINE— $104.16. 
Cumberland Mills, Warren Ch., by 

Rev. E. M. Cousins $06 31 

Scarboro, by Rev. A. Smith 7 85 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $228.60. 

Concord, A Friend 5 00 

Dover, First Ch., by J. H. Wheeler... 120 10 

Hampton, J. P. Mason 1 00 

A Friend of Home Missions... 5 00 

Keene, A Friend 8 00 

Kingston, A Friend 5 00 

North Hampton, A Friend, bvE Cove 20 00 
Portsmouth, Mrs. M. Bufford,bv J. T. 

Rand 5 00 

Wakefield, Daniel Smith... 57 50 

Warner, Mrs. R. W. Sargent 2 00 

VERMONT— $130.00. 

Bennington Center, Sunday-school of 
the First Cong. Ch. of Christ, by 
Mary A. Harwood. 39 00 

Fairfax, Mrs. M. S. Forsyth, $5; Mrs. 

E. S. Chamberlin, $2, special 7 00 

St. Johnsbury, Mrs. William 1'. Fair- 
banks, special 75 00 

Yeigennes, by A. Ross 15 00 

MASSACHUSETTS— $3,130.00. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc. by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas $1,000 00 

By request of Donors 405 OS 

of which $16 for Bohemian S. S. 
work. $50 from Y. P. S. C. E., Eliot 
Ch., Newton, for Salary Fund, and 
$1 for Children's Bohemian Fund. 
Amherst, First Ch., by W. Hamlin... 60 00 

South Ch., by J. E. Merrick 5 70 

Arlington, Ladies 1 Benev. Circle, Or- 
thodox Ch., by Mrs. M. J. Wiggin.. 44 00 

Beverly, Mrs. E. M. Knowlton. 3 00 

Blackington,Ch.,J. H.Reynolds. 39 00 

Boston, Woman's Home Miss. Assoc, 
Mrs. Sarah K. Burgess, Treas., for 

Salary Fund 150 55 

Dorchester, Mrs Walter Baker, spec- 
ial 100 00 

Fitchburg, F. C. Hoyt. 1 40 

Framingham, AM 2 00 

Hadley, First Ch., in full, to const. 
Mrs." J. S. Smith a L. M., by Mrs. E. 
Smith ... 28 00 

Russell Ch., by Rev. E. S. Dwight.. 12 58 

Lowell, L. Kimball 20 00 

A. G. S 5 00 

Monson, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by Miss 

E. M. Newton 25 00 

Monterev, by J. Townscnd 14 60 

Randolph, Miss Abby W. Turner .100 00 

Southbridge, A Friend 5 00 

South Worcester, Ch. of the Covenant 
Woman's Aux. by Mrs. E. G. Hall.. 6 00 

Springfield, Miss C. E. Bowdoin 40 00 

H. M 1,000 00 

Stockbridge, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. S. 

C. Clough, special... _ 10 00 

Sunderland, Cong. Sunday-school, by 

A. S. Williams 31 09 

Worcester, Ladies' Miss. Soc. of the 
Pilgrim Ch., by Mrs. C. S. Duck- 
worth 10 00 

C. F. Grout 10 00 

Lenex *. 2 00 

RHODE ISLAND— $1.00. 
Newport, Master Henry G. Simmons, 
special _ 1 00 



CONNECTICUT— $3,659.35 ; of which 
legacies, $1,850.00. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn.; W. W. Jacobs, 
Treas., by Rev. W. H. Moore, Sec. 
Received by Mrs. S. M. Hotch- 
kiss, Treas. Woman's H. M. 
Union: 

Hartford, a Friend in Park 
Ch., by Mrs. O. G. Terry, 

special $10 00 

Wallingford, Ladies' Soc. by 
by Miss Jennie E. Dool it- 
He, for Salary Fund 125 00* 

West Chester, Ladies' Soc, 
special 5 00 



$113 35 



140 00 



Correction : $1.50 of the amount contributed to 
a missionary. horse, should have been credited to 
Milford, First Ch., Aux. by Mrs. J. A. Biddle. 



Bridgeport, Second Cong. Ch., by O. 
H.Brothwell 

Centerbrook and Ivoryton, Chs, by 
Rev. L. S. Griggs _ 

i lolchester, A Friend 

Connecticut, A Friend 

X 

Durham, First, by H. G. Newton 

Enfield, First Cong. Sunday-school, 
Birthday Offerings, by II." P. Par- 
sons 

Gleaners' Mission Circle, by Mrs. F. 
B. Goudy 

Farmington, Friends, for a Mission- 
ary Salary 

Hartford, Legacy of Elizabeth C.Root, 

by J. H. Root, Ex 

Asylum Hill Ch., A Friend, by C. E. 

Thompson 

A Friend, for freight 

Lakeville, Salisbury Woman's H. M. 
Soc, by Mrs. M. II. Williams 

Madison, A Helper 

Morris, Mrs. J. W. Skilton and her 
class of Sunday-school boys 

New Haven, Ch. of the Redeemer, in 

part, by J. B. Baldwin 

Davenport Ch., add'l, by C. E. Hart. 
E. II. Bishop, by F. T. Jarman 

New London, First, by C. D. Boss, Jr. 

Northfield, by L. S. Wooster 

Orange, Orange Workers, by R. J. 
Woodruff 

Rocky Hill, On account of Legacy of 
Rev. A. B. Smith, by Rev. E. Har- 
mon, Ex 

Roxbury, Mrs. E. W. Preston, by B. 
S. Preston & Son 

Sharon, by Rev. J. R. Bourne 

Southport, Rev. Z. B. Burr 

South Windsor, First, by C. J. Rock- 
well.. 

Stamford, First Ch., by G. W. Toms, 
Jr., to const. Dr. T. V. Ketcham a 
L. M 

Stonington bv Rev. C. J. Hill 

First, by B. F. Williams 

Stratford, Mrs. Mary E. Curtiss 

Thomaston, Ladies' H. M. Soc. of 
First Ch., by Mrs. G. C. Gilbert 

West Winsted, Second Cong. Sunday- 
school, by C. B. Holmes 

Woodbury,' First, by J. H. Lineley 

Woonsocket, Globe Ch., special 



92 00 

66 41 

10 00 
105 00 

16 35 

11 45 



1 00 

30 00 

75 00 

1,00C 00 

5 00 
1 0J 

41 30 
1 00 

1 40 

100 00 

1 00 

5 00 

50 98 

.. 20 00 



4 00 



850 00 

5 00 

88 76 

30 00 

31 18 



60 15 

200 00 

21 00 

5 00 

20 00 

27 72 

29 30 

400 00 



INNS. 



THE HUME MISSIONARY 



81 



NEW YORK— $988;5&; 

Received by Mrs. L, II. Cobb, 

Treas: Woman's II. M. Union, 

N. V.: 

Brooklyn, Ladies' Soc. Ch. 
of the Pilgrims, for Salary 
Fund - $137 50 

Churcbville, Ladies' Mi-s. 

SOC 5 00 

Fairpoit, Mrs. G. Brooks, to 
const. -Nli>. 8. E. Trail a 
1,. M 50 00 

Oswego, Ladies' H. M. Soc.. 15 00 

Brooklyn, Mow England Cong. Ch.,by 

s. B Hoinan 

Central Cong. Sunday-school, by I). 

('. 'Helmut 

Union Cong. Ch., by E. E. Stewart.. 
A Friend 

Buffalo, Pilgrim Ch., by E. M. Dar- 
ling -- --- 

Friendship, by Rev. M. Gaffney 

Gaines, Ch., $87.48; Sunday - school, 
$8.69, byG. 1). Ward 

Hicks, Mrs. S. A. Davis 

Jamestown, First Cong. Sunday- 
school, by E. A. Tapper 

Rev. W. Hedges 

Rev. W. I). Henry 

New York City, Broadwaj Tabernacli 
Ch., C. X, Bliss, $350: J. T. Leavitt, 
$100, lo const. Prof. K. A. Pice and 

Mrs M. A. Rice L. Ms.. 

First. Morrisania, by T. T.W. Miner, 
lo const. Rev. P. G. Wood bridge a 

L. M 

Pilgrim Ch.,add'l, by II. X. Lock- 
wood - 

Union Then. Sura., by R. E. Far- 
rier 

" Left in Mother's Purse," by W. C. 
Conant - 

North Evans, by Rev. A. Bigelow 

Parishville, Mrs. T. Flags. 

Richford, by W. Livermore.. 

Richmond Hill, by J. A. Smith 

West Winfleld, by S. II. Bonfoy 

XEW JERSEY-$43.04. 

Jersey City, by Rev. X. M. Sherwood 

Newark, Mrs. A". B. Woodhull.. 

Warrenviii-, by Rev. G. Baderstsoher 

Woodbridge, First Ch., by D. S. Voor- 

hees - 

PEXXSVI.VAXIA— 883 30. 

Alden, bv Rev. D. J. .Tones 

Bangor, by Rev: J. Williams. 

Kane, by j. Davis _ 

Mi. (arnicl, by Rev. J). 1). Davies ... 
Pittsburg. Welsh Ch., by J. Jarrett 

Roxboro, A Friend ... 

Sliarpsburg, by Rev. W.W. McCrack- 



MARYLAXD— $5.00. 

Baltimore, Missionary Box of Susan D. 
Metcalf 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $25.00. 

Washington, Ladies' H. M. Soc. First 
Cong. Ch., special, for Salary Fund, 
by Miss L. Patterson 



$207 50 

85 00 

7 90 

5 III) 
100 00 

25 10 

s on 

46 15 
20 00 

1 1 56 

6 oo 
10 00 



?50 00 



50 23 


25 00 


20 37 


00 
17 72 
2 00 
15 00 
14 00 
115 00 


13 20 
5 00 
3 33 



GEORGIA— $10.00. 

Atlanta, Sundav-school Concert, $5; 
Rev. W. Shaw, $5 

X )RTB CAROLIXA— $5.30. 

>j L„,nsville, First Ch.. $2.06; Second, 
'. !•(, by Rev. A. Connet 



It 50 
5 00 

12 00 
i; 89 

30 00 

10 00 

5 00 



5 00 



25 00 



10 00 



5 30 



AKKAXSAS— $18.00. 

Siloam Springs, $5 ; Rev. A'. E. Loba, 
$13.00 $18 00 

FLORIDA— $126 87. 

Daytona, bv Rev. C. M Bingham 16 -.'■ 

Jacksonville, by Rev. R. T. Hall I'M 01 

Tavares, by Rev. A. T. Clarke 8 49 

1X1)1 AX TERRITORY— $10.30. 

Doaksville, by Rev. A. Gross 3 00 

McAllister, by Rev. -J. H. Van Dyne.. 7 30 

NEW MEXICO-$13.00. 

San Rafael, bv Rev. J. P. Salazar 3 00 

White Oaks, by Rev. P. E. Luud 10 00 

TKNXESSEE— $14.01. 

Nashville, Union Ch. Fisk University, 
byE. C sticke.1 S14 91 

OHIO— $1,995.42. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser. in 

March: 
Alexis, by Rev. G.B. Drown $5 00 
Brownhelm, by Mollie G. 

Goodrich 9 00 

Charlestown, by Rev. L. J. 

Donaldson., 3 50 

Cincinnati, Central, by Hor- 
ace Stacy, of which from 

Sunday-school. $14 25 195 87 

Clarksfield, by Mrs. W. II. 

Winans 6 00 

Cleveland, First 5 00 

Euclid Avenue, by T. M. 

Bates. 70 00 

Columbus. Eastwood, by J. 

Jay Barber 15 90 

Grafton, by Rev. E. A. 

Hoffman. 6 03 

Lafavette, by Rev. E. F. 

Baud 10 00 

Lorain, "The dying gift of 

Mrs. A. D. Barber"/. 50 00 

Xorth Amherst, by Rev. K. 

H. Crane.... 10 7S 

Xorth Ridgeville, by Rev. J. 

P. Riedinger, of which 21c. 

from Mrs^ Rogers" class. . _ 13 74 
Palmyra, by" William 

Tnomas 10 00 

Parkman, by A. D. Wilmot. 8 00 
Radnor, Ch, $16.69; Sunday- 
school, $3.31, by John 

Powell. ___ 20 00 

Ridgeville Corners, by W. 

Richardson 10 00 

Rock port, by Rev. I. M. 

Channon 3 25 

Sandusky, Ch. and Sunday- 
school, by Rev. G. H. 

Peeke 67 52 

South Newbury, L. II. M S., 

by J. S. -Way 11 97 

Steuben, by Rev. J. W. 

Charlton 7 07 

Sugar Creek, by Rev. J. T. 

Griffiths 4 30 

Toledo, Central, by Miss E. 

Manning 15 00 

York, by Rev. E. F. Baird.. 30 00 
Centerville, West Penn., 

Mission Concert, by Ella 

M. Clark 10 00 

Corrv, West Penn., by D. 

Barlow 5 00 

Huntington, West Va., by D. 

E. Abbott, of which $4.38 

from Sunday-school 26 53 

Newport, Ky., Arthur W. 

Bradley 5 00 

635 36 



82 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



June, 



Received by Mrs. Phebe A. Crafts, 

Treas. Woman's H. M. Union: 
Austinburgh, Miss V. A. 

Haight 85 00 

Greenwich, Ladies 1 Miss. 

Soc 5 00 

Tallmage, Young Ladies' H. 

M. Soc 5 00 

"Vermillion, Ladies' Miss. 

Soc 5 00 



Received in March by C. P. Churchill. 
Treas. Bohemian Board, 
Cleveland, ( hii: 

Alexandria, Sunday-school. 8 3 25 

Cleveland, A Friend 20 00 

Plymouth, Mrs. Gibbons' 

Sunday-school class 3 70 

Euclid Avenue Sunday- 
school.. 25 00 

Jennings Avenue Ch 50 00 

In Memorv of Mrs. H. B. 

Fraser.... 45 00 

Edinburgh, Sunday-school. 4 11 

Freedom, Ch 6 00 

Sunday-school 5 00 

Hampden, Ch l 75 

Sunday-school l 25 

Iluntsburg.... 5 00 

Kent, Sunday-school. 4 17 

Lodi.. 5 90 

Newport, Sunday-school 5 25 

South Newbury, Sunday- 
school . 3 03 

West Andover 3 30 

Williamstield, Sunday- 
school 2 50 

North Monroeville 9 76 

Sharon, Peiin 2 59 



206 50 



Received by Mrs. Phebe A. 
Crafts, Treas. Ohio 
Woman's II. M. Union: 
Cincinnati, Central Cong. 

Ch., L. II. M. S. 25 00 

Columbus, Eastwood Ch., 

Y. L. M. Band.; 5 00 

Edinburgh, W. M. S., special 5 00 
Elyria, First Cong. Ch., 
Christmas offering from 

Little Helpers. 5 00 

Lorain, Ladies, special . 12 00 

Medina, Primary Sunday- 
school class 50 



852 50 



Bellevue, S. W. Boise 

Cincinnati, Ladies' Aid Soc. of Storrs 
Cong. Ch., by Rev. L. P. Foster 

Elyria, First Ch., of which from E. W. 
M., $300; H. E, 8250: T.L. N. $25, by 

H. Ely 

First- Cong. Sunday-school for. Sun- 
day-school work, by H. Ely 

Kent, iiv S. Hathaway 

Lodi, A Frien , by E. R. Whipple 

New London, by Rev. F. P. Sanders.. 

Oberlin, C. Powers.. 

Rochester, by Rev. F. P. Sanders 

Sheffield, by W. A. Day 

Toledo, First, by M. Bingham 

Twinsburg, Mrs. L. S. Buell, in full, to 
const. Mrs. R. M. Shample, a L. M., 
by C. B. Lane 

Wakeman, C. S. F 

INDIANA— $523.00. 

Michigan City, First Cong. Sunday- 
school, Birthday offering, by A. 
Nichols 



820 00 



259 00 
35 00 

5 00 

711 50 

40 00 

9 50 

10 00 

6 00 
100 00 

10 00 

8 00 

116 00 



30 00 
10 00 



5 23 



ILLINOIS-$414.44. 

Bone Gap. O. S. Rice 810 00 

Chicago, On account of Rent of Philo 

Carpenter's house, by Rev. J. E. 

Roy, D.D., Trustee 97 44 

Griggsville, Mrs. E. H. Philbrick, In 

Memoriam, by J. D. Philbrick 300 00 

Milburn, "Clydesdale" 2 00 

Plymouth, Miss A. A. Burton 5 00 

MISSOURI— 841.70. 

Hannibal, by Rev. G. T Holcombe... 2 70 

Kidder and Sharon, by Rev. J. M. 

Bowers 14 00 

North Springfield, bv Rev. H. C. 

Brown 25 00 

MICHIGAN— 81,040.30. 

Received by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Woman's Home 
Miss. Union: 

Adrian, L. M. S $9 00 

Alba, Mite Boxes 5 00 

Benton Harbor, W. II. M. 

and Mite Boxes. 30 00 

Calumet 04 00 

CIicIm'm, Happy Messengers. 1 50 

Cooper, Pledge cards 2 00 

Delta 2 95 

Detroit, Trumbull Avenue 

Ch. L. M. S 15 84 

Flint... 17 00 

GayloFd 10 S3 

Grass Lake _. 10 00 

Grand Rapids, South Ch., 

Ladies. 5 00 

Hancock 15 00 

Horton'sBay 5 00 

Ironton 5 00 

Jackson... 10 00 

Kalamazoo 46 00 

Lacey, Nellie E. Humphrey. 1 00 
Lake Linden, L. M. S., $20 ; 

King's Daughters, $10 30 00 

Leonidas, Ladies of the Ch. 5 00 

Mattawan 10 00 

Muskegon 10 00 

Nunica, Ladies of the Ch 2 55 

Olivet, L. B. S 20 00 

Onekama, W. H. M. S. Mite 

Boxes. 5 00 

Onondaga. 1 00 

Saginaw Conference: 
East Saginaw, Y. L. M. S. 
$11. Emergency Fund, 
$2.25 $13 xio 

Bay Citv. 10 00 

Tawas City 6 00. 

— 29 25 

St. Johns. 5 50 

St. Ignace, Mission Band, 

Mite Boxes.... 3 50 ' 

South Haven 22 45 

Wacousta •. , 4 00 

Whittaker 8 00 

Wolverine Mite Boxes 8 00 

$419 37 
Hunter Horse Fund: 

Alpena, A Friend.. 5 00 

Greenville, Sunday-school, 

add'l 10 

Kalamazoo, Y. P. S. C. E.... 10 00 



$15 10 
North Star Mission : 

Alba, Sunday-school 11 10 

Alpena, Sunday-school as 00 

Alpena, Young Ladies 10 50 

Bancroft, Sunday-school... 3 50 
Benton Harbor, Sunday- 
school 9 00 

Benzonia... 25 30 

Carmel, Sunday-school 2 SO 

Cheboygan, Sunday-school. 1 25 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



83 



Co vert, Sunday-school 

I )u nd it, Sunday-school 

Eastmanvllle, Union Sun- 
day-school 

East Saginaw, Sunday-school 
Eaton Rapids, Twenty-three 

persons 

Essexville, Coll. on Easter 
Morning, $1.50; a few 

pupils, §1. CO 

Far well, Mrs. Hitchcock's 

Sunday-school class of 

Boys.. 

Fruitport, Sunday-school.. 
Grand Rapids, Second Ch. 

Opportunity Club 

Hancock, Sunday-school. . . 
Homestead, Little Gracie 

Smith and Sister 

Norton's Hay 

I ronton, Sunday-school 

Ithaca, W. M. S 

Kingsroad, Sunday-school. 
Laingsburg, Sunday-school. 

Leroy, Sunday-school 

Lexington, Sunday-school. 
Litchfield, Sunday-school . 
Mancelona, Sunday-school. 
Nashville, Sunday-school . . 
North Leoni, Sunday-school 
North port, W. M. S, $3,32; 

Sunday-school Mite Hoxes, 

$4.51.. 

■North Unity, Sunday-school 

Oakley, Sunday-school 

Olivet, Sunday-school 

Richmond, Sunday-school.. 

Romeo, Sunday-school 

Hondo, V. P. N. S., H. and 

Foreign M. S.. 

St. tgnace, Sunday-school . . . 
St. Johns, Cheerful Givers.. 
Saugatuck, Children's H. M. 

S, S3; Sunday-school, 

$2.70 

Shelby, Sunday-school 

Sheridan, Sunday-school.. . 
Stanton, Cheerful Workers, 

Mission Band 

Three Oaks, Sunday-school 

Utica, Junior C. E. 8 

Vernon, Buds of Promise, 

Juvenile M. B 

Webster, Sunday-school 



$l(i t;o 
4 00 

8 10 

15 00 



3 10 



1 20 


2 05 


3 50 


22 00 


1 10 


1 60 


6 85 


5 85 


1 00 


2 50 


8 00 


2 00 


90 


2 40 


5 00 


85 


7 83 


1 10 


2 00 


11 00 


1 33 


3 50 


3 00 


3 60 


10 00 



5 70 

2 10 

6 00 

4 00 

6 50 

3 03 

5 00 

7 49 



$280 23 

Ann Arbor, First, by R. Campbell 

Bridgeport, by Rev. A. A. Wall 

Bronson and Gilead, by Rev. J. M. 

Sutherland 

Charlevoix, by Rev. A. O. Downs 

Cheboygan, by Rev. W. S. Bugbey... 

Cleon, add'l, by Rev. R. Redeoff 

East Leighton, Union Dorcas Soc, by 

Rev. J. Whalley. 

Garden, by Rev. W. C. Hunter 

Hersey, by Rev. J. G. Hodges 

Hetherton, by Rev. D. H. Pierce 

Lake Linden, A Friend, by Rev. J. VV. 

Savage 

Leonidas, $7 50; Mendon,$0, by Rev. 

F. M. Aunks 

Merrill, by Rev. F. W. Link... 

Pentwater, by Rev. L. F. Waldo 

Perry, by Rev. O. C. Bailey 

Pinckney, by J. A. Cad well 

Sault Ste Marie and Pine Grove, by 

Rev. G. C. Empson 

Sheridan, by Rev. A. H. Claflin 

Sherman, add'l, by Rev. R. Redeoff.. 
Solon, Maple Citv and Glen Arbor, by 

Rev. A. Metcalf . . . 

Union City, Dr. J. W. Clark, 

Shiawassee Township, Union Sun- 

dav school. District No. 5, by G. 

Kirker, ".2 00 

[Erroneously acknowledged in May.] 



WISCONSIN— $0.00. 

Clear Lake, by Rev. M. Peterson. 
Green Bay, Hattie Olmstead 



714 70 


83 50 
14 29 


13 70 
8 00 
6 84 
5 75 


2 70 

11 18 

5 60 

2 00 


10 00 


13 50 
4 50 
2 00 
1 64 

12 75 


10 00 

3 50 

4 00 


16 15 
100 00 



IOWA— $9. 10. 

Clinton, by Rev. G. E. Christofferson 
Manchester, C. Sanborn 

Tipton, First, by Rev. A. G. Brande.. 

SUNN ESOT A— $275.72. 

Received by Hev. J. II. Morley: 

Cannon Falls 5 00 

Claremont Ladies' Society 5 45 

Cottage Grove 10 00 

Elk River, by II. D. Mills .8 65 

Mantorville 3 31 

Minneapolis, I'lTinouth Church 67 30 

J. Goldsbury 10 00 

Winona, First ,....18 00 

Zumbrota, Sunday-school 6 93 



Ada,by Rev. S. Stone 

Alexandria, First, by E. E. Haugh- 
wont 

Fosston, by Rev. A. A. Davis 

Hawley, by Rev. O. M. Smith 

Lamberton and Walnut Grove.by Rev 
(i, H. Smith 

Little Falls, bv Rev. D. Donovan 

Mankato, by Rev. II. A. Bushnell 

Minneapolis, First, by VV. F. Decker 

Lora Hoi lister _ 

Montevideo, by Rev. W. F. Furman.. 
Ortonville, First, by C. H. Whitman 
Rose Creek and Lyle, by Rev. J. S. .. 

Bounce 

Rushford, by Rev. O. P. Champlin.. 



KANSAS- 



95.10. 



Received by Rev. L. P. Broad: 

Howard 35 00 

Junction City 2 30 



Received by Rev. J. G. Dougherty, 

Treas. Kans. H. M. Soc. _ 

Kansas Woman's H. M.Soc 37 75 

Argentine 10 08 

Maple Hill 8 00 

Russel 10 00 



$1 00 
5 00 



5 00 

.60 

3 50 



34 64 


6 50 


15 72 


5 00 


8 60 


2 65 


3 75 


20 50 


27 23 


1 00 


2 00 


27 01 


1 00 


20 00 



Bloomington and Dial, by Rev. F. G. 

Mc Henry _ 

Blue Rapids, by Rev. W. M. Brown... 5 
Cottonwood Falls, by Rev. J.H. 

Jones 

Dunlap, by Rev. G. P. Claflin 

Edmonds and Hill City, by Rev. N. R. 

George _ 

Haven and Mt. Hope, by Rev. E. J. 

Collins 

Highland, $7; Leona, $5, by Rev. D. 

E. Todd 

Junction City, Ch. Birthday offerings, 

byT. S. Harkin 

Leavenworth, First Ch. $175; Sunday- 
school, $25. by G. H. Hyde 

Onaga, by Rev. J. J. Wilson 

Palermo, Maria Rappelve 

Pratt, Mrs. O. B. Smith, by E. F. 

Smith 

Ridgeway, by Rev. M. J. Morse 

Stafford and Plevna, by Rev, L. Hull 

Topeka, by Rev. A. M. Piper 

Wakefield, by Rev. R.Kerr. 

Waushara, by Rev. W. R. Egele 

NEBRASKA— $179.93. 

Chadron, L. and II 

Cowles, by Rev. W. D. Page 

Crete, by Rev. J. Schaerer 

Culbertson, Osborne and Hayes Co., 
by Re v. J. Arnold 



00 



37 30 



65 83 

3 37 

500 
6 30 

2 00 

2 75 
12 00 

4 50 

200 00 
1 30 
500 

1 00 

3 50 
9 25 

16 50 
8 00 
6 50 



5 00 
34 00 

3 00 

4 62 



84 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



June, 



DeWitt and Plymouth, by Kev. D. E. 

Hathaway 

Farnain, by Kev. \V. Woolman 

McGook, by Rev. W. Suess 

Red Cloud, by Rev. M. C. Butler..... 
Seward, Birthday offerings, by Rev. 

A. M. Darley 

Spring Creek and Nelson, by Rev. P. 

Weidrnan. 

Wahoo, by Rev. A. A. Crossnian 

NORTH DAKOTA— $51.80. 
Received by Rev. II. C. Simmons: 

NewRockford $5 00 

Walcott... 3 00 

Wahpeton — 13 40 

Woman's II. M. Soc 7 G5 



Cooperstown, by Rev. II. P. James.. 

Fargo, First, by F. W. Leavens 

Harwood, Ladies' H. M. Soc. by Mrs. 
ILL. Gilbert 

Michigan City, by Rev. W. B. Cun- 
ningham _ 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $154.15. 
Received by Mrs. Sue Fifield, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Soc: 

Plankinton $5 57 

Sioux Falls 10 00 

Yankton 7 45 



J50 oo 

3 13 

10 40 

35 28 

1 00 

2 25 
31 25 



29 05 
1 25 
9 00 

6 00 

6 50 



23 02 



30 62 
3 75 


43 11 


3 29 
10 00 


4 88 

28 00 

4 58 

2 90 



Alpena, $19.10; Mitchell, $1.52; Parks- 
ton, $10, by Rev. C.W. Wurrschmidt 
. Gettysburg, by Rev. P. B. Fisk 

Hartland, $13.91; Lake Henry, $29.20, 
by Rev. F. G. Appleton 

Milbank, Cong. Sunday-school, by G. 
A. Wood 

Sioux Falls, Hattie C. Phillips 

Springfield and Running Water, by 
Rev. C. Seccombe. 

Temple, by Rev. S. F. Huntley 

Volga, by Rev. H. O. Lawrence 

Woman's H. M. Soc, by C. G. Black. 



COLORADO— $113.16. 
Received by Rev. R. T. Cross: 

West Denver, Ch $21 25 

Sunday-school 3 35 

Ladies' Miss. Soc 11 00 

Y.P. S. C. E _. 9 00 

44 60 

Buena Vista, by Rev. J. G. Spencer.. 10 00 

Coal Creek, by Rev. M. A. Ellis 25 00 

Longmont, First, by E. White 33 56 

WYOMING— $5.00. 
Buffalo, by Rev. W. J Skelton 5 00 

MONTANA— $25.00. 
Helena, Conference, by Rev. F. D. 
Kelsey 25 00 

CALIFORNIA— $144.70. 

Berkley, by Rev. W. F. Bickford 3 00 

Anna B. Carter 1 00 

Bethany and Byron, by Rev. W. H. 

Tubb 14 00 

Carlsbad, $13; Oceanside, $6, by Rev. 

H M. Daniels.. 19 00 

Cottonwood, by Rev. J. H. Warren, 

D. D 360 

Edgemont and Eagle Rock, by Rev. E. 

Cash.. 7 00 

Escondido, by Rev. M. A. Starr 7 45 

Eureka, by Rev. D. D. Bowman. 13 00 

Monrovia, by Rev. D. II. Colcord 10 00 

Perris, by Rev. C. H.Davis 12 95 

Rockland, by Rev. I. F. Tobey 3 00 

San Bernardino, by Rev. J.D. Foster, 17 50 

San Juan, by Rev. W. Rogers.. 16 50 

Sierra Valley, by Rev. C.E: Philbrook 11 70 

Sweet Water, by Rev. A. Bixby. 5 00 



OREGON— $90.60. 
Received by Rev. G. H. Atkinson: 

Dalles.. $10 00 

Portland 63 60 

$73 CO 

Astoria, by Rev. G. C.Hall 10 00 

Hillsboro, by Rev. C. Derrick 7 00 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $39.65. 

Atahnuin, by F. B. Woodcock 10 15 

Coupeville. Miss E. E. Schneider's 

Mission Circle 5 00 

Farmington and Endicott, by Rev. 

J. V. Hoyt..._ 5 00 

Houghton andTolt, bv Rev. D. H. 

Bieknell *. 2 00 

Natchez and Wenas Valley, by E. W. 

Dixon 5 00 

Ritzville, by Rev. E. J. Singer 1 00 

Wood River, by Rev. F. Balch 11 50 

TURKEY— $50.00. 

Constantinople, Rev. G. Washburn, D. 
D 50 00 

AFRICA— $5.00. 
Bailunda, Rev. W. M. Stover, by Rev. 
E. E. Strong, D. D 5 00 

Home Missionary 154 45 

$13,808.39 



Donations of Clothing, etc. 

Andover, Mass., Library of Rev. Charles 
Smith, by Mrs, Caroline E. Smith 

Bridgeport, Ct., Ladies of Park St. Ch., 

by Sarah. E. Hubbard, barrel $56 50 

Bristol, R. I., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 
of First Ch., by Annie W. Fitch, bar- 
rel 81 00 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
South Ch., by Maria Libby, box 140 00 

Elyria, O., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. of 
First Ch., by Miss C. E. Crandall, box 
and freight. _. 18173 

Gildersleeve, Ct., Mrs. W. N. Harvey, 
two barrels, cash and freight _. 50 00 

Hartford, Ct., Ladies' Soc. of Asylum 
Hill Ch., by Mrs. J. H. Cone, box.... 97 14 
Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. of Pearl St. 
Ch., by Hattie E. Cowles, through 
the Woman's Cong. Home Mission- 
ary Union of Ct, barrel 87 34 

A Friend, bundle. 

Homer, N. Y., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc, 
by Ellen F. Phillips, barrel 38 73 

Kent, Ct., Ladies' Sew. Soc, through 
The Womans' Cong. HomeMiss'y Un- 
ion of Conn., by R. J. Hopson, barrel. 4S 30 

Middletown, Ct , Ladies' Home Miss. 
Soc of First Ch., by C. M. Bacon, box 
and barrel . 130 00 

New Haven, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. 
Soc. of First Ch., by Mary E. Bennett, 
three boxes and freight 425 50 

Newport, R. I., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
United Ch., by Elisa R. Hammett, 

box 104 00 

Master Henry G. Simmons, overcoat 
to son of a Missionary. 

New York City, State Charities Aid As- 
soc, by Burrall Hoffman, bundle. 

Norwich, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 
of Broadway Ch., by Gertrude H. 
Linnell, through The Woman's Cong. 
Home Miss'y Union of Conn, two bar- 
rels and cash 154 16 

Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. of Park Ch., 
by Lydia B. Young, box 173 70 

Olivet, Mich., Ladies' Aid Soc, three 
barrels 75 00 



JlllK\ 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



85 



Parishville, BT. Y.,W. M. C, by Mrs. O. 
C. Barnes, barrel 

Providence, K. 1, Ladit's 1 Benev. Sac. 
of Union Ch.,by Mrs. Wm, Knight, 
box 

St. Johnsbury, Vt, \\ II 81. S. of 
North Ch., by Mi- W. P. Smith, box. 

St. Louis, Mo. , Ladies' Home Miss Soc. 
of Pilgrim Ch. , four barrels and half 
barrel. 

Stratford, Ct, Sew. Soc, by Mrs. R, W. 
Bunnell, box 

Suffield, Ct, Young Ladies' 11. M. C. by 
ll. u. Kelsey, through The Woman's 
Cong. HomeMies'y Union of Ct., box. 

Thompson, Ct., Miss Ella E. Ames, box 
books. 

Wallingford, <'t., through 'The Woman's 
t long. Home Missiouai y I Dion of 
Conn., by Miss J. E. Doolittle, box. . 

WindsoT Locks, Ct., Lai Ins' Home Mies. 
Soc, by fitra. C. II. Coye, barrel 

Winter Park, Fla., Ladies' Home Bliss. 
Soc. Anx. to the W. C. 11. M. U. of 
Fla., by Mrs. L. A. Austin, barrel and 
cash 



$32 0) 

114 00 

140 00 

341 12 
150 00 

37 36 



70 74 
83 05 



40 G5 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY. 
Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary 

i if) April, Rev. Edwin 1!. Palmer, Tikis. 

Abington, First, by E. M Nash $28 11 

Ait'onl, by Rev. Augustus Alvord 4 50 

Amherst, Chapel, by W. C. Estv, to 

const Mrs. E. S. Tyler L. M. of A. II. 

M. S. 310 70 

Andover, South, by George Gould 25 00 

Arlington, Orth., by Robert A. Ware... 80 00 

Ashland, by Edwin Perry 30 00 

Aver, First, by Francis Lovejoy 17 00 

Barnstable, Centerville, Ladies' Sew'g 

Cir.,byH. R. Scudder 10 00 

Boston, "B. & L.." for the debt . 5 00 

Bowles, Fidelia W. for A. II. M. S. . 50 00 

"C. A. S." UK) 00 

Charlestown, Firs: Parish, A Friend.. 20 00 
Dorchester, Pilgrim, by J. L. Miller, 
to const. Rev. J. W. Ballantine L. 

M. of A. II. M. Soc 85 00 

"B. " special, for Rev. J. E. Smith, 

Hart, Mich 5 On 

Ballantine, Rev. J. W 1 00 

Neponset, Mrs. Asa Robinson, special 10 00 
Roxburv, Immanuel, "by Francis J. 

Ward.... 50 00 

West, South Evan, by J. II. Guild.. 20 19 

Boxford, West, by Rev. C. L. Hubbard. 12 20 
Braintree, First Parish, Ladies - H. M.S. 
bv Mrs. Sarah H. Thayer, to const. 
Mrs. C. B. Minchin, Mrs. M. M. Wales 

and Miss E. E. Weeks L. Ms. 100 00 
South, South, by Rev. E. O. Dyer, for 

A. II. M. s '_ 14 50 

Bridgewater, Central Square, by G. II. 

Martin ' a 00 

Scotland, Ladies, by Mrs. W. M. Pratt. 10 00 
Brimfield, Second, by Geo. M. Hitch- 
cock ' 14 

Brockton, Joseph Hewitt 5 00 

Brookline, Harvard, bv H. B. Eager 76 75 

"S. A. and E. H."__. 10 00 

"S. A. and E. H." special 1 00 

Burlington, bv Samuel Sewall 22 00 

Chelmsford, Central, by E F. Winn 20 00 

Dana, by Rev. J. G. Willis . 2 SO 

Dedham, Friends, for A. H. M. S._ 5 00 

Detroit, Michigan, Frank E. Perkins... 5 40 
Easton, James Rankin, by Rev F. P. 

Chapin 25 on 

Essex, by Mary C. Osgood . 46 27 

Y. P. S. C. E. by Mary C. Osgood 20 93 



Falmouth, North, by Ward Eldred $25 00 

Parwell, Mich., refunded by Rev. T. A. 

P., special _ _ 2 00 

Foxboro, s. S. Class No. 18, by Rev. A. 

i: Tracy, for A. II. M. s. 6 00 

Gardner, First, by Raul II. Rand, to 

const,. Mrs. s. A. Whittemore, Mrs. C. 

M. Bryant, W. II. Wilson, and Han'] 

H. Rand, L. Ms. 125 00 

Glyndon, Minn., Mrs. M. G. Millard, 

special, for Scandn. work in Woburn, 

Mass 2 00 

Grafton, North, Mrs. Win. D. Mascroft. 5 00 

Granby, by Simeon Kellogg, for A. II. 

MS _ 100 00 

Hampden, Benev. Association, 
by Chas. Marsh, Tr., Ilolyoke, Sec- 
ond, for French Prot. Ch $100 00 

Monson 27 57 

Springfield, A Friend 5 00 

" First 90 00 

Memorial 100 09 

" Olivet 37 58 

West Springfield, First, for 

French College 28 00 

388 15 

Hubbardston, by Alden Pollard 35 00 

Income of Sabra Carter fund. 25 00 

" " Sabrana Walker Haile fund. 62 50 

" " J. C. Whitin fund 862 50 

Ipswich, First, by N. R. Farley 60 00 

Lakeville, by Rev. S. B. Andrews 2 96 

Lawrence, United, bv Rev. J. T. Whal- 

ley 10 00 

Leicester, First, S. S., by Arthur W. 

Marsh 21 32 

Leominster. North, Anon 10 

Lowell, Eliot, S. S. Class of Mrs. E. A. 

Bigelow 10 00 

Lynn, Chestnut St., by W. A. Blood 11 00 

Maiden, A Friend, " ML E. B.".. 3 00 

Melrose, Orth., by Rev. A. G. Bale, for 

A. II. M. S 40 00 

Highlands, hy Joel Snow 25 00 

Newbury, First, by Edward Perkins 32 30 

Newburyport, North, bv J. B. Crcasey 
(of wh. §1.00 for Children's Boh. 

fund) 34 33 

Newton, Center, First, bv F. H. Scud- 
der for A. II. M. S. 199 75 

Eliot, by D. E. Snow 125 00 

Y. P. s: C. E. by Miss Emily Emer 
son, towards Salary of Rev. R. \V. 

Fletcher, Ortonville, Minn 50 00 

West, Second, bv J. L. Clarke.. 16! 46 

"Pax," for A.H. M. S..__. 5 00 

Newtonville, .Mrs. II. M. Ware 1 00 

Otis, by Rev. S. W. Powell 15 00 

Peru, S. S. Penny Contributions, by S. 

S. Bowen 12 50 

Quincy, Atlantic, Memorial S. S. by 

Cephas Drew 4 16 

Evan, by Rev. Edward Norton .. 105 50 
S. S. Primary Dept. by c. W. Carter.. 5 00 

Reading, by S. G. B. Pearson 25 00 

Revere, First, by Rev. J. P. Bixby 28 08 

Rochester, North, bv Rev. S. B. An- 
drews 3 84 

Shelburne, Miss Sarah P. Kellogg, to 

const, self, L. M. of A. H. M. S... 50 00 

Shirley, A Friend. " L.""___ 2 00 

Soeierville, Broadway, by G. W. S. 

Huse _ 17 00 

East, Franklin St., by Alpheus Bow- 
ers 151 35 

Southbridge, Globe Village, Evan. Free, 

by Alva L. Hyde 29 21 

South Hadley. First, by L. M. Gaylord. 30 00 
Spencer, S. S. Class No. 28, bv Mrs. J. 

W. Temple, for Boh. S. S. Work 16 00 

Sturbridsre,. bv Melvin Havnes 47 75 

Sutton, bvC.E. Hutchinson 24 01 

Upton, First, by Dan"l C. Buck 67 02 

Waltham, Trim, by T. W. Temple 49 40 

Westford, Union, by Daniel Atwood 35 00 

Westport, Pacific Union, by J. C. Ma- 
comber 6 00 



8G 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



June, 



West Stockbridge, Center, by Rev. A. 

Aivord $1 00 

\V> viiKiuth, South, Union, by W. H. 

Bolster 223 46 

Wuately, by C. K. Waite, to const. E. C. 

Warner L. M. of A. H. M. S 50 00 

Williamstown, First, by Chas. S. Cole.. 19 42 

Winchendon, North, by Rev. Davis Fos- 
ter 43 29 

Winchester, First, D. N. Skillings, an- 
nuity, by C. E. Conant, Trustee 100 00 

Wollaston, by N. G. Nickerson 12 60 

Worcester, Central, by E. H. Sanford.. 170 00 
Piedmont, by C. F. Marble, for A. H. 

M. S 35 00 

Wrentham, Miss Jemima Hawes 50 00 

$4,005 51 

Home Missionary 00 



t,611 51 



Correction : On page 477 of the March Home 
Missionary the " $44.01 " credited to the " Union 
Church, Ludlow," should have been credited to 
the Union Church, Palmer. On page 33 of The 
Home Missionary for May, read as follows: 
Massachusetts Home Missionary Society $0,000; 
by request of donors, $2,376.99. Also, in May 
number, page 47, second column, last line but one, 
for "$19.00" read $19.05; page 42, after "New 
Salem," for "Rev. L. Jones" read Rufus M. 
Taft. 



Donations of Clothing, etc., received and reported 
at the rooms oftht I^ass. Home Aliss. Society, 
in April. 

Boston, Jamaica Plain, Central, Ladies' 
Sewing Circle, by Mrs. L. J. Wood, 
barrel and box $112 00 

Brookline, S. A. and E. H. package, tin- 
appraised 

North Andover, Ladies, by Mrs. C. E. 
Stillings, barrel and cash _ 50 30 

Pittslield, First, Free Will Soc, by Mrs. 
M. B. Davis, barrel and freight 76 10 

Salem, South, Ladies 1 H. Miss. Soc, by 

A. M. Farrington, supplies 535 00 

Spencer, Ladies' Char. Soc, by Mrs. J. 
W. Temple, barrel and freight 25 00 

Wakefield. Ladies' Char. Soc, by Mrs. 
T.J. Skinner, boxes 129 00 

Ware, S. S. Class 60 00 

Whitinsville, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by 
Lila S. Whitin, box and freight 172 42 

$1,159 88 



ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society 
in March, Aaron B. Mead, Treas. 

Abingdon $9 35 

Albion, William Marriott, 5 00 

Alton, Church of the Redeemer 43 21 

Amboy 55 00 

Anna, special 4 15 

Ashkum, Woman's Miss. Society 3 00 

Aurora, First.. 46 17 

Juvenile Mission Band 20 00 

New England 35 25 

Avon, special 10 36 

Batavia, Young People's Miss. Society, 10 00 
Big Rock, S. S. Class, Miss Rae Jones, 

Teacher 5 00 



Bloomington $8 04 

Brighton 20 00 

Bunker Hill, W. H.M.Union. ._■ 10 00 

Bureau, (In support of services) 8 84 

Byron, A. A. Johnston 3 00 

Canton, Ladies' Miss. Society, _ 7 25 

Carpentersville 20 00 

Champaign, W. H. M. Union 5 00 

Chicago, "First C43 71 

Plymouth 120 25 

New England, Ladies' Miss. Society.. 20 00 

Judge W. H. Bradlev 100 00 

South 79 17 

Millard Avenue 18 00 

South German... 2 50 

Cobden _ 8 00 

Crescent, W. H. M. Union 3 0J 

" 4 00 

Crete, Rev. Samuel Porter, 1 00 

Crystal Lake 10 00 

Danvers 14 05 

De K.Ub 38 00 

De Pue, In support of services 7 67 

Elgin, $211.33; S. S., $12.50 223 83 

Elm wood _ 37 70 

Englewood, First. 59 00 

North 50 00 

Evanston, Frank M.Elliott 10 00 

Galesburg, First, 50 00 

Galesburg, First Church of Christ, 

$760.04; Special, $15. 775 04 

Galva,. 23 73 

Granville, special 6 00 

Greenville.. 10 00 

Gridley, Young People's Miss. Soc , 15 50 

Harvard, Ladies' Miss. Soc 13 00 

Huntley, Mrs. Ezra Trumbull, for the 

debt 1 00 

Illini, W. H. M. Union, 9 50 

Jacksonville, Rev. H. E. Butler, $5; Y. 

P. S. C. E. $2.50; W. H. M. Union, $25 32 50 

Joliet, Rev. S. Penfield, 5 00 

Knoxville, H. Rowles 5 00 

La Harpe, special 55 00 

La Salle,. _ 3 55 

Loda, Ladies' Miss. Society, $11: Mr. and 

Mrs. C. E. Slocum,$5. 16 00 

Lombard, Capt. S. P. Blake, special, $3; 

E. G. Blake, $3 00 

Ludlow, Mrs. Margaret Y. Gourley, 5 00 

Maywood, 50 00 

McLean, W. H. M. Union 15 00 

Melvin, 6 00 

Mendon, Henry P.Baldwin 25 00 

Morgan Park 5 00 

Morton, Rev. &. Mrs. J. P. Hutchinson, 20 00 

Newtown, 6 CO 

New Windsor, 5 00 

OakPark,... _ 237 76 

Ladies' Benevolent Soc, 21 00 

Onarga, Second, • 18 00 

Oneida, J. C. Burt 5 00 

Ottawa, special $75; $3 78 00 

Thomas D. Catlin, 100 00 

ParkRidge, 35 00 

Payson, $7; Ladies' Society, $6 13 00 

Peoria, First, $128.20; S. S., $25 153 20 

Pittsfield 36 96 

Plainfield... 18 25 

Plymouth, Sunday-school 9 05 

Polo, Mrs. R. M. Pearson and Daugh- 
ter. 3 00 

Princeton 25 00 

Providence 22 06 

Roberts 15 50 

Rockford, Second, W. II. M. Union.... 47 90 

Rollo 13 00 

Roscoe, $6; W. H. M. Union, $8.77 14 77 

Sheffield 140 00 

South Chicago, special, $14.16; Mission 

$1.... 15 16 

Springfield, Second, in support of ser- 
vices .- 30 IX) 

St. Charles, $12.50; Rev. Geo. H. Smith 

and Wife, $5 17 50 

Sterling, Y. P. S. C. E., $5; W. II. M. 

Union, $11.80 10 80 



1 sss. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



87 



Stillman Valley $10 00 

Ladies 1 Miss. Society 25 00 

Bummer Hill 10 

Thomasboro, " It." - 4 68 

Tonica - 22 S8 

Toulon, Ladies' Mies. Society 4 25 

Turner, $8; Mrs. It. Currier, §2 10 00 

Villa Ridge 25 00 

Woman's II. M. Union of Illinois 8 25 

Rev. A. Etnridge, special 100 00 

Rev. Henry Willard, Chicago... 10 00 

Bev. Klavel Bascom 10 oo 

A Friend, Rockford 1 00 

Eev. 10. A. Paddock, special 11 00 

A Friend, special 59 00 

Cash 2 00 

A Friend 3 00 

A Friend. 5 00 

Interest on the Emergency Fund 12G 00 

$3,901 C3 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTI- 
CUT. 

Receipts of the. Missionary Society of Connecticut, 
in April, Ward W. Jacobs, Treas. 

Ashford, Westford, by Dea. C. W. Brett. $4 70 

Bridgeport, Second, by Edward W. 

.Marsh 20 00 

Bridgewater, by Eli Minor, for A. H. 

M. S 5 00 

Chaplin, by Rev. Francis Williams 15 00 

Easton, by Rev. David J. Ogden 11 00 

East Windsor, Broad Brook, by S. B. 

Adams 17 35 

Enfield, hv Albert Abbe, $24; for A. H. 

M. S., $108.85 132 35 

Essex, S. S., by P. Williams, Sec'y 15 00 

Fairfield, Greenfield, by Oliver II, Meek- 
er, §5.40; $12.57.. * 18 03 

Lyme, First, Free-Will Offering, by Rev. 

E. F. Burr 22 G6 

Madison. North Madison, by Rev. Win. 

E. B. Moore _ 18 00 

New Britain, South, by Wm. II. Hart, 

special" 5 00 

Newington, by H. M. Robbins. 19 82 

New London, First, by C. D. Boss, Jr., 

Quarterly G3 18 

North Canaan, by A. B. Garfield 4 50 

Norwich, Broadwav, by S. B. Bishop... 200 00 
Putnam, Second, by H. N. Fenn, §16.27; 

for A. II. M. S., $16.27. 32 54 

South Windsor, First, by C. J. Rock- 
well 1 20 

Bprague, Hanover, by Rev. E. W. Mer- 

ritt.. S 25 

Sufiield, William Hallantine, personal. 2 00 

Winchester, West Winsted, by John 
Hinsdale, add'l,$100 of which is from 
Mr. Caleb J. Camp to constitute Caleb 
J. Camp and Mrs. Sarah B. Camp, 
both of West Winsted, Ct, L. Ms.... 294 41 
Windsor, Poquonock, Thomas Duncan, 

i)ersonal, for work among Germans.. 100 00 
Woodstock, East and North Wood- 
stock, Union Meeting, a Thank Offer- 
ing, by Rev. A T. Reed 16 76 

§1,026 75 



IOWA HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Iowa Home Missionary Society 

in March, J. 11. Merrill, Treas. 

Algona $58 20 

Anita 40 oo 

Aurelia 2 37 

lielinond 7 05 

Bethel 12 49 

Cincinnati 102 25 

Cleveland, Welsh 10 00 

English : 14 52 

Council Bluffs 127 80 

Woman's Miss. Society 5 oo 

Creston " " " 5 mi 

Davenport " " 5 hi 

Rev. J. A. Reed 50 00 

Dee Moines, Plymouth, 239 t>4 

Woman's Society 10 14 

Pilgrim, Woman's Society 6 63 

Dunlap 24 55 

Woman's Miss. Society 10 00 

Fort Dodge, S. S 5 50 

Grant 3 00 

Grinnell, $57.50; A Friend, §5 62 50 

Lewis, Woman's Miss. Society 5 on 

Mason City, S S 8 15 

Midland, Woman's Miss. Society _ 12 00 

Mt. Pleasant " " " 7 45 

Muscatine 96 50 

Newton 30 75 

Peterson 14 54 

Postville 57 00 

Primgar... - 6 23 

Reinbeck, Woman's Miss. Society 4 00 

Rock Rapids 10 00 

Rockford, Woman's Miss. Society 6 44 

Salem, Friends 5 00 

Shenandoah, $63.75; S. S., $33.85; Busy 

Bees,$2 99 60 

Shfrrill's Mound 5 00 

Stacyville, $11: S. S.,$5_ • 16 oo 

Strawberry Point, Busy Bees 1 00 

Stuart, Y. P. S. C. E '. 5 22 

Vancleve 15 50 

Victor 25 00 

Waterloo 62 77 

Waverly 4 26 

Sioux Association, for Pastor at large.. 48 00 

$1,352 80 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY 
SALARIES. 

Previously acknowledged $3,850 33 

Connecticut, Farmington, $75; Walling- 

ford, $125. 200 00 

District of Columbia, Washington 25 00 

Massachusetts, Boston, $150.55; M. H. 

M. S.,$50 200 55 

New York, Brooklyn 137 50 

Vermont, St. Johnsbury 75 00 



CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledged $2,530 58 

Massachusetts, M. H. M. S 17 00 



$2,547 53 



88 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



June, 1888. 



MtOMltU'S 



£tutc g. 



New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org. 

1805, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Concord, Sec. 
Minnesota Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org 1872, Mrs. II. L.Chase, Minneapolis, See. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1880, Mrs. Gertrude A. Denio, Bangor, Sec. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1881, Mrs. Leroy Warren, Lansing, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 1881, Mrs. Geo. L. Epps, Topeka, Sec. 
Ohio, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 188-3. Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Oberlln, Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct, 1883, Mrs. C. C. Creegan, Syracuse, 

s ■>■. 
Wisconsin, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

ove. Oct , 1883, Mrs. C. Matter. Brodhead, Sec. 
North Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1883, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Har- 

wood, Sec. 
Iowa, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

June, 1886, Miss Ella E. Marsh," Griunell, Sec. 



gtX. (Drgcinteatiims. 

California, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. Oct., 1887, Mrs. M. L. P. Eastman, San 

Francisco, Sec. 
South Hakota, Woman's Home Missionary 

Union, org. Sept., 1884, Mrs. S. E. Young 

Sioux Falls, Sec. 
Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Jan., 1885, Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, Hart- 
ford, Sec. 
Missouri, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1885, Mrs. E. P. Bronson, 3100 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1885, Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Nebraska, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

Nov., 1887, Mrs. L. F. Berry, Fremont, Sec 
Florida, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Feb. 1888, Mrs. N. Barrows, Winter 

Park, Sec. 

Washington [ Woman,s Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, Mrs. N. F. Cobleigh, Walla Walla, 
Sec." 



W&iitUmXt a Roman's ^tatc g. g-X. (DvganUation. 



Alabama. 

Arizona. 

Arkansas. 

Carolinas. 

Colorado. 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Georgia. 

Idaho. 

Indiana. 



Indian Territory. 

Kentucky. 

Louisana. 

Maryland. 

Massachusetts. 

Mississippi. 

Montana. 

Nevada. 

New Jersey. 



New Mexico. 

Pennsylvania. 

Rhode Island. 

Tennessee. 

Texas. 

Utah. 

Vermont. 

Virginia. 

Wyoming. 



JWssionavi} JJoxcs. 



For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the homes of 
its missionaries, with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance of these favors 
is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribution, attention is invited 
to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, if practi- 
cable, how soon a box will probably be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applying to the Secretaries, notify them without delay so as to 
guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. If several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the Secre- 
taries, whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, not 
by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise as "fast freight," by railroad, 
taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in the box. 
and the money, $2, $3, or $4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of freight (if it 
cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter of acknowledgment 
should be addressed. 

6. Report to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the amount sent 
for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home Missionaky. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the Secretaries, 
put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from whom it comes, and 
the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of acknowledgment. 

8. Mark the box, "American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New York," 
adding the name of the place from which it comes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing money for freight, and stating the time when and the line by 
which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide in the assignment 
of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, "and the' age and sex of each child for whom 
the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants of the Society. It needs the same amount of 
money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no such gifts were 
provided; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or diminish their contribu- 
tions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are needful. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



X- H° me IMi ss i° nar y 



Advertising Department. 

npHE attention of the readers of THE HOME MIS- 
SIONARY, and of business men generally, is called 
to its advantages as an advertising medium. It has a 
larcre circulation, covering the whole countrv, and the use 
of its pages cannot fail to secure the most satisfactory 
returns. Address, 

The Argus Printing Co. 

44 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J. 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



The Argus Printing Co. 

No. 44 Montgomery Street, 

JERSEY CITY. 

New York Office, - - 150 Nassau Street. 
♦ 

OUR JOB DEPARTMENT. 

TTAVING recently added the latest styles of type, and all modern improve- 
ments pertaining to this department, and employing the best workmen, 
we are prepared to execute First-class Printing at moderate prices. 



OUR BOOK DEPARTMENT. 

TN this department we are second to none in the State. With a large force 
of compositors, and the only type-setting machines in New Jersey, we can 
furnish all classes of Book and Law Printing with great despatch. 



OUR PRESSWORK DEPARTMENT, 

OCCUPYING three floors of our magnificent building, and filled with the 
latest improved machinery, is able to cope with any house in New York 
as to prices and speed in turning out all kinds of presswork. 



OUR ELECTROTYPING DEPARTMENT 

T S a new departure in the printing trade in Jersey City, and with the newest 
*■ labor-saving machinery, we can guarantee perfect work and entire satis- 
faction with the productions of this department. 



ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



The Jersey City Argus 



ONE V DEMOCRA TlC PAIL Y NEWSPAPER 
PUBLISHED IN JERSEY CITY. 



LARGEST CIRCULATION IN HUDSON CO. 



Offers unexampled advantages to advertisers, being a 
family paper, which reaches all classes in all parts of 
the County, from Bergen Point to Union Hill. No 
advertiser can afford to overlook it. 



Main Office: No. 44 MONTGOMERY STREET. 
Branch Offices in NEW YORK CITY, HOBOKEN AND BAYONNE. 

CHAS. S. CLARKE, Jr., Manager. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



MOZART PARLOR ORCAN and AVERY SEW 
INC MACHINE, Worth $150, Both for $60. 

A GREAT 
COMBINATION. 




DIMENSIONS: Height, 
74 ia.; Depth, 21 in.: 
Length, 45 in.; Weight, 
boxed, 350 lbs. 

This H a ii <1 s o m e 
Parlor Organ, 5 Oc- 
taves, c o n t a i n i n g 
Four Sets of Reeds, 
Nine St o p s, Two 
Knee Swells, Price, 
*90 OO. 

Elegance of Finish, 
Elasticity of Touch, 
Pipe-like Tone. Origin- 
ality of Design. Beauty 
of style. 



NEW improved high 
arm, new mechanical* 
principles and rotary 
movements, automatic, 
(1 i rect and perfect action 
cylinder shuttle, self- 
acting needle, positive 
feed, no springs, few 
parts, minimum weight, 
no friction, no Boise] no 
wear, no fatigue, uo"tan- 
trums," capacity unlim- 
ited, always in order, 
richly ornamented, 
nickel plated, and gives 
perfect satisfaction. 



Having perfected arrangements for the purpose 
of introduction, with the manufacturers of the 
above Organs and Sewing Machines, which are 
listed at $00.00 and $(>0.00 respectively, we are able 
to offer both at the price of the Sewing Machine, 
$60.00. Both fully guaranteed satisfactory or 
money refunded. Address for further particulars, 
or call and examine at the warerooms of the Sew- 
ing Machine and Organ Association. 

(From the Christian at Work.) 
We hereby call the attention of our patrons to 
the sewing machine and parlor organ combina- 
tion, by which both of these valuable articles 
(which every well-ordered home finds so indis- 
pensable) are offered at the price of an ordinary 
sewing machine. The reference giver, that of the 
Alford & Berkele Co.", is sufficient with, us to be- 
lieve that the Company will do as they say. We 
consider it one of the best offers ever made in this 
direction. 

F. C. CANDEE & CO., Sole Agents. 
No. 7 West 14th Street, New York City. 
Reference, THE ALFORD & BERKELE CO., 
Pr O. Box 2002. 77 ( 'hainbers Street. 




MARSHALL 



CORDED CORSET WAISTS. 

Beautifully made of BEST 
MATERIALS throughout. 
THOUSANDS NOW IN USE 

B3?" Be sure your Corset is 

stamped "Good Sense." 

FIT ALL AWEN-Infants 

to Adults. Sold by 

ijumnju RETAILERS 

everywhere. Send for circular. 

FERRIS BR0S. aannfactn « r s5 

341 Broadway, New York. 
FIELD _&_ CO., CHICAGO* 



CLINTON H. MENEELY BELL CO. 

TROY. NEW YORK, 

Manufacture Superior. 
CHURCH and SCHOOL BELLS. 




MENEELY & COMPANY, 
WEST TROY, N. Y„ BELLS, 

For Churches, Schools, etc. , also Chimes 
and Peals. For more than half a century 
noted for superiority over all others. 



MARVELOUS 

MEMORY 

DISCOVERY. 

"Wholly unlike artificial systems. 

Cure of mind wandering. 
Any hook learned in one reading. 
Classes of 1087 at Baltimore, 1005 at Detroit, 
1500 at Philadelphia, 1113 at Washington, 
1316 at Boston, large classes of Columbia Law 
students, at Yale, Wellesiey, Oberlin, University 
of Penn., Michigan University, Chautauqua, &c. 
&c. Indorsed liy Richard Proctor, the scien- 
tist, Hons. W. W. Astor, Judaii P. Benjamin, 
Judge Gibson, Dr. Brown, E. H. Cook, Prin. 
N. Y. State Normal College, &c. Taught by 
correspondence. Prospectus post free from 
PROP. LOISETTE, 237 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 



WHOLESALE WESTERN AGENTS. 









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THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price could not 
well be less. Its whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they prefer to pay, 
it will be sent without further charge, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members; Missionaries 
of the Society and its Auxiliaries; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their Congregations; 
also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy for every ten dollars collected and 
paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. Pas- 
tors are earnestly requested to serve Homo Missions by promoting the use of thiB Journal at the 
Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-offlco address should be given. 



APPLICATIONS FOR AID. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should make 
a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an application. They 
should also give these particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations. 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and poet-office address : Town, County, State. 

Does he reside on his field of labor f Is he installed pastor ? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry ? 

Of what local church is he a member ? 

Of what Ministerial Association ? 

The number of persons composing his family. 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people, and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage ? 

Is aid expected from any other source? 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. S. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to the Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the conditions, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by the 
trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose limits the congregation is found, has a " Committee 
of Missions, " the members of that Committee should certify these statements, the standing of the 
minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no such " Committee 
of Missions" exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more neighboring clergymen 
acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet gathered, applicants will follow 
the same course as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary of the 
Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing all the 
particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To this the certificate of the missionary that the 
congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 



FORM OP A BEQUEST. 
I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall 

act' as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the 
year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said 
Society, and under its direction. 



JUXE, 1S§8. 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible Mouse, *Astor Place, New JTork. 



Rev. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 
Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D., i „ ^ . ■ ■ „ 
Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D.D., [ Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. CLAPP, D.D., Treasurer. 

Executive Committee:— Mr. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; Mr. WM. HENRY SMITH; Rev. WM. M. 
TAYLOR, D. D.; Mr. CHARLES H. PARSONS; Mr. ALBERT WOODRUFF; GEO. P. SHELDON, 
Esq.; Rev. JAMES G. ROBERTS, D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; Mr. JOSEPH WM. 
RICE; Mr. HERBERT M. DIXON; Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D.; Rev. ROBERT R. MERE- 
DITH, D. D.; Mr. FRANCIS FLINT ; WM. IVES WASHBURN, Esq., Recording Secretary. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for 

Correspondence. 

Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, and to the Woman's 

Department, may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y, 



DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS, 

In Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders; also Communications relating to the 
business matters of The Home Missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be addressed 
to Alex'rH. Clapp, Treasurer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Post-Office Orders should be drawn on STATION D, New York City. 
A Payment of $50 constitutes a Life Member. 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Clark C. Otis, Financial Superintendent, Bible Honse, New York. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, Work among Bohemians, Poles, etc., Cleveland, O. 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, Work among Germans, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandinavians, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Rev. Leroy Warren Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. Edw. D. Curtis Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rev. J. fl. Morley Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Franklin B. Doe St. Louie, Mo. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. 

—New Mexico. 

Rev. Geo. A. Hood, ...Ashland, Wis. 



Rev. John L. Maile Omaha, Neb. 

Rev. Hiram D. Wiard Mitchell, Dak. 

Rev. H. C. Simmons Fargo, No. Dak. 

Rev. C. M. Sanders Denver, Col. 

Rev. W. S. Hawkes Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. J. H. Warren, D.D... San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. G. H. Atkinson, D.D Portland, Or. 



Rev. T. W. Jones, 34 Bible House, New York City. 



SECRETARIES AND TREASURERS 

OF THE AUXILIARIES. 

Rev. JONATHAN E. ADAMS, Secretary Maine Missionary Society Bangor, Me. 

JOHN L. CROSBY, Esq., Treasurer " Bangor, Me. 

Rev. EDWARD H. GREELEY, D.D., Secretary, New Hampshire Home Miss. Soc. Concord, N. H. 

Hon. LYMAN D. STEVENS, Treasurer - •' " .Concord, N. H. 

Rev. CHARLES S. SMITH, Secretary Vermont Domestic " Montpelier, Vt. 

J. C.EMERY, Esq., Treasurer " " Montpelier, Vt. 

Rev. JOSHUA COIT, Secretary Massachusetts Home *• (23 Congr. House, 

Rev. EDWIN B. PALMER, Treasurer " " J Boston, Mass. 

Rev. ALEXANDER McGREGOR, Secretary.. Mode Island " •' Pawtucket, R. I. 

EDWIN BARROWS, Esq., Treasurer " " *' Providence, R. I. 

Rev. WILLIAM H. MOORE, Secretary Missionary Soc. of Connecticut. Hartford, Conn. 

WARD W. JACOBS, Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. AUGUSTUS G. UPTON, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society... Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " •' New York City. 

Rev. J. G. FRASER, Secretary Ohio " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " " New York City. 

Rev. JAMES TOMPKINS, Secretary Illinois " " > 151 Washington St., 

AARON B. MEAD, Esq., Treasurer " " " J Chicago, Illinois. 

Rev. T. G. GRASSIE, Secretary Wisconsin " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. A. McCOLLOUGH, Esq., Treasurer " " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. DOUGLASS, Secretary Iowa » " Grinnell, Iowa? 

J. H. MERRILL, Esq., Treasurer " " " Des Moines, Iowa. 



The Argus Printing Company, New York and Jbbsky Cur. 




t/y • / 1/ <— *-^ ' ' v is 



THE 




y^ 



Home Missionary. 



JULY, 1888, 



CONTENTS. 



IXTY-SECOND ANNIVERSARY. 80 
felegates from state societies. 90 

Like Members 91 

Report of Committee on South- 
ern Work 93 

■beting ok the Executive COM- 
MITTEE 07 

flfcTY-SECOND REPORT 98 

Summary of Results 100 

Tin: Treasury 101 

Comparative Results 101 

The Woman's Department 102 

The Sunday-Schools 103 

Dub Publications 103 

Family Supplies 104 

Distribution op Missionaries by 

Bections 105 

dlstki butiox of missionaries by 

States 106 

General Comparative Rksults. .108 

LUXILIAHIES AND MISSIONARY 

FIELDS 100 

Maine Miss. Soc 109 

New Hampshire Home Miss. Soc. .110 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc 110 

Massachusetts Home Miss. Soc. Ill 

Rhode Island Home Miss. Soc 113 

Miss. Soc. of Connecticut 114 

New York Home Miss. Soc 114 

Pennsylvania HO 

Ohio Home Miss. Soc HO 

Illinois Homf Miss. Soc 119 

i Wisconsin Homf Miss. Soc 120 

North Wisconsin 121 

Iowa Home Miss. Soc 122 

Maryland, District of Columbia, 
Virginia, Tennessee and Geor- 
gia 123 

Florida 124 

Missouri, Arkansas and Indian 
Territory 125 



Texas and Louisiana 126 

New Mexico and Arizona 127 

Indiana 128 

Michigan 130 

Minnesota 131 

Kansas 132 

Nerraska 133 

Noirrn Nebraska, Black Hills 
(Dakota Ter.), and Northeast 

Wyoming 135 

Black Hills and East Wyoming. 1 :>•"> 

South Dakota 135 

NoRTnDAKOTAANn East Montana. l:'.U 

Colorado and East Wyoming. . . .137 
Utah, Idaho and West Montana.138 
North California and Nevada. .139 

Southern California 139 

Oregon and East Washington. . .140 

West Washington 112 

Work among Immigrant Popula- 
tions : Slavonic Department. .143 

Scandinavian Department 14fi 

German Department 148 

Conclusion 150 

WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 151 

The Saratoga Meeting 151 

Minutes 151 

Address of Greeting 152 

Our Armor 155 

The Mormons in Sweden 158 

Rocky Mountain Experiences. ..158 

Have Salt in Yourselves 163 

Gleanings 167 

MISSIONARY APPOINTMENTS. .171 

RECEIPTS 171 

WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSION- 
ARY SALARIES 180 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 180 
WOMAN'S STATE H. M. ORGANI- 
ZATIONS 180 



Vol. LXL No. 3. 

NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Bible House, Astor Place. 



SIST7 CENTS A YEAR, IN ADVANCE, POSTAGE PAID. 



KMTFKKl) AT THK POST OkWK AT NKW VO»K, H. Y.. AS HWXWD CLASS [HAH.] 1UTTK*, 



THE 

HOME MISSIONAEY. 

Go Preach the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sent? Rom. x. 15. 

VOL. LXI. JULY, 1888. No. 3. 

MINUTES 

OF THE 

SIXTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING 

OF THE 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



The American Home Missionary Society convened for its sixty-second 
annual meeting, in the Methodist Episcopal Church, Saratoga Springs, 
N. Y., at 7:30 p. m., Tuesday, June 5, 18S8. 

The President, Rev. Julius H. Seelye, D.D., LL.D., of Massa- 
chusetts, called the body to order. 

Devotional services were conducted by Rev. Levi H. Cobb, D.D., of 
New York. Rev. George Leon Walker, D.D., of Connecticut, 
preached the annual sermon, from Is. lx: 4, 5. 

The Lord's Supper was then administered by Rev. James Brand, 
D.D., of Ohio, and Rev. Edward N. Packard, of New York. 

After the benediction, the meeting adjourned till 8:30 A. m., Wednes- 
day. 

Wednesday Morning, June 6. — At 8:30 the Society spent a half- 
hour in devotion, led by Rev. Albert H. Currier, D.D., of Ohio. 

At 9 the President took the chair, and prayer was offered by Rev. 
Francis J. Fairbanks, of Massachusetts. 

Rev. William H. Moore, of Connecticut, was chosen Assistant 
Recording Secretary. 

The President appointed the following Committees: 

On the Boll. — Rev. William H. Moore, of Connecticut; Rev. Willlui H. 
Holmax, of Connecticut. 



90 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

On Business. — Rev. Edward N. Packard, of New York; Rev. Truman O. 
Douglass, of Iowa; William H. Thompson, of Connecticut. 

On Nomination*. — Rev. Joshua Coit, of Massachusetts; Rev. Augustus G. 
Upton, of New York; Thomas Rich, of Connecticut. 

On Report of the Executive Committee. — Rev. James Brand, D.D., of Ohio; Rev. 
Charles R. Bliss, of Illinois; Richard H. Stearns, of Massachusetts. 

On Paper of Secretary Clark. — Rev. Richard Cordley, D.D., of Kansas; Rev. 
Robert R. Meredith, D.D., of New York; William H. Strong, of Michigan; 
Sidney E. Bridgman, of Massachusetts; Henry D. Smith, of Connecticut. 

On Paper of Secretary Barrows. — Hamilton W. Mabie, of New York; Rev. James 
L. Hill, of Massachusetts; Rev. Nehemiah Boynton, of Massachusetts; Hon. 
James White, of Massachusetts; A. Lines Van Blarcom, of California. 

The President made an opening address. Prayer was offered by Rev. 
James G. Johnson, D.D., of Connecticut. After singing, Secretary 
Clark read a paper entitled, A Crisis in Home Missions. 

After singing, Secretary Barrows presented a paper on Lay Activity 
in Missionary Work and the Minister's Responsibility for its Develop- 
ment. 

These papers were referred to their appropriate committees. 

After singing, Auxiliary Societies Avere represented in addresses, as 
follows: The Rhode Island Home Missionary Society, by Rev. Alex- 
ander McGregor, Secretary; The Missionary Society of Connecticut, 
by Rev. William H. Moore, Secretary; The New York Home Missionary 
Society by Rev. Charles C. Creegan, D.D., of Massachusetts, 
former Secretary; and The Ohio Home Missionary Society, by Rev. 
James G. Fraser, Secretary. 

At 12:30 recess was taken till 3 p. m. 

Wednesday Afternoon. — Met at 3, in the lecture-room of the 
church. Prayer was offered by Rev. Daniel L. Furber, D.D., of 
Massachusetts. The Minutes of Tuesday evening and Wednesday morn- 
ing were approved. The Committee on the Roll made a report, which 
was accepted and approved. The Committee were authorize! to com- 
plete the Roll, which, when completed, was as follows: 

Delegates from State Societies. 
Connecticut. Iowa. New Hampshire. 

Rev. John Avery, Rey Charles H Bissell, Rev. George H. De Bevoise, 

Rev. Dwight M. Pratt, Rey Charles Brown, Rev. C. E. Harrington, 

Edward W. Marsh. Rey Truman Q Douglass> Rev F L gmall> 

Florida. Rev F- n. Wolcott. Lyman D. Stevens. 

Rev. S. F. Gale. 

Massachusetts. Vermont. 

Illinois. 

Rev. William E. Brooks, Rev. Nehemiah Boynton, Rev. J. H.. Babbitt, 

Rev. H. S. Harrison. Sidney E. Bridgman. Rev. George W. Phillips. 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



91 



Life Members. 



California. 

A. Lines Van Blarcom, 
Rev. James 11. Warren, 

Mrs. (Rev.) J. W. Pickett. 
Connecticut. 

Rev. Joseph Anderson, 

Rev. Henry P. Bake, 

Strong II. Barber, 

Mrs. (Rev.) W. M. Barrows 

Rev. Arthur J. Benedict, 

Philo Bevin, 

Mrs. Philo Bevin, 

William \Y. Bull, 

David N. Camp, 

Rev. Lucius H. Higgins, 

Rev. William H. Hohnan, 

Charles Hotehkiss, 

Rev. Edward L. Jaggar, 

Rev. James G. Johnson, 

Saxton B. Little, 

Rev. Oscar G. Mclntire, 

George Maxwell, 

Mrs. George Maxwell, 

Charles M. Minor, 

Rev. William II. Moore, 

Mrs. N. T. Nallett, 

Miss A. B. Nichols, 

H. L. Reade, 

E. G. Seeley, 

Rev. Edward A. Smith, 

Rev. Charles H. Williams. 

Dakota. 

Rev. Henry C. Simmons. 

Illinois. 

Rev. Charles R, Bliss, 
Rev. Azariah Hyde. 

Iowa. 

Mrs. (Rev.) T. O. Douglass, 
Miss R. L. Page. 

Kansas. 

Rev. Richard Cordley, 
Rev. J. Homer Parker. 



Maine. 

Rev. Henry S. Huntington, 

Massachusetts. 

C. P. Adams, 
Margaret B. Adams, 
Mrs. A. M. D. Alexander, 
Rev. George W. Andrews, 
Rev. Warren Applebee, 
Rev. William F. Avery, 
Rev. John W. Ballanline, 
Mrs. I). J. Bartlett, 
Miss Catharine C. Bell, 
Rev. Robert C. Bell, 
Rev. J. T. Blades, 
Elizabeth T. Boise, 
Rebecca D. Boise, 
Miss Carrie E. Bowdoin, 
Rev. George M. Boynton, 
Rev. Albert Bryant, 
Mrs. S. G. Bennop, 
Rev. Ezra H. Byington, 
Mrs. E. H. Byington, 
H. L. Clark, 
Rev. Eli B. Clarke, 
Wilbur S. Clarke, 
Rev. Joshua Coit, 
Rev. W. W. Curtis, 
Rev. Calvin Cutter, 
Rev. Morton Dexter, 
Miss M. T. Dutton, 
Rev. William R. Eastman, 
Rev. S. P. Fay, 
Rev. J. E. Fullerton, 
Rev. D. L. Furber, 
L. N. Goodman, 
Elnathan Graves, 
Rev. M. F. Hardy, 
Rev. James L. Hill, 
Rev. L. Smith Hobart, 
Rev. Hiram Houston, 
E. A. Hubbard, 
Loring Johnson, 
Rev. Charles Jones, 
Miner Eelley, 
Mrs. Horace Kibbe, 
Edward W. Kingsley, 
Rev. Edward H. Knight, 
Mrs. (Rev.) E. H. Knight, 
Mrs. M. F. Leonard, 



Rev. Payson W. Lyman, 

D. Messenger, 

Mrs. D. Messenger, 

Sarah M. Newton, 

Mrs. II. L. Parsons, 

Charles B. Rice, 

Annie M. Hanger, 

Rev. C. S. Sargent, 

Ezra Sawyer, 

Mrs. Ezra Sawyer, 

Rev. J. H. Seelye, 

Rev. Stewart Sheldon, 

Rev. William T. Sleeper, 

Josiah Spaulding, 

Fannie L. Stone, 

Rev. Rufus M. Taft, 

Rev. Edward S. Tead, 

Rev. George A. Tewksbury, 

Rufus B. Tobey, 

Rev. A. E. Tracy, 

Mrs. M. E. Tufts, 

Miss S. C. Tufts, 

Levi Wallace, 

Mrs. James W. Ward, 

G. Henry Whitcomb, 

Mrs. G. Henry Whitcomb, 

James White, 

Samuel C. Wilkins, 

Abiel E.Wilson, 

Warren H. Winchester, 

Rev. John Wood, 

Mrs. Lydia C. Wood. 

Michigan. 

Rev. Leroy Warren, 
Mrs. (Rev.) Leroy Warren. 

Minnesota. 
J. Goldsbury, 
Rev. John H. Morley. 

Missouri. 
Mrs. C. L. Goodell. 

Nebraska. 
Rev. John B. Doolittle. 

New Hampshire. 
W. S. Briggs, 
Franklin Downing, 
Rev. Edward H. Greeley, 
Gyles Merrill, 
Rev. Smith Norton. 



92 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



July, 



New Jersey. 

Mrs. H. M. Shelton, 
John "Wiley. 

New York. 

Mrs. M. 0. Banks, 
Mrs. R. A. Barber, 
Rev. Walter M. Barrows, 
Rev. B. F. Bradford, 
Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, 
Rev. Levi H. Cobb, 
Herbert M. Dixon, 
Mrs. Rhoda E. Johnson, 
Rev. Samuel Johnson, 
Mrs. S. A. Lombard, 



Rev. Clark C. Otis, 
Rev. Edward N. Packard, 
Rev. William S. Smart, 
William Henry Smith, 
Rev. Way land Spaulding, 
Rev. Clarence F. Swift, 
Rev. Avery S. Walker, 
Richard G. Woodbridge, 
Rev. Charles C. Creegan, 

Ohio. 

Rev. John G. Fraser. 

Rhode Island. 



Rev. Alexander McGregor, 
J. G. Parkhurst. 

Tennessee. 

Mrs. Almira S. Steele. 

Vermont. 

Rockwood Barrett, 
Rev. Edward T. Fairbanks, 
Franklin Fairbanks, 
Mrs. Franklin Fairbanks, 
Rev. William T. Herrick, 
Rev. C. H. Merrill, 
Rev. M. C. Stebbins. 



E. C. E. Davis, 
Mrs. J. R. Goodale, 
Rev. James H. Lyon, 



Japan. 
Rev. Otis Cary. 

An overture from the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church relating to the Sabbath was presented, and it was voted, that it 
be communicated to the Provisional Committee of the National Council 
of the Congregational Churches of the United States. 

The Nominating Committee reported officers for the ensuing year, 
who were elected, as follows: 

PRESIDENT. 
Rev. Julius H. Seelye, D.D., LL.D., of Massachusetts. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 
Rev. James H. Fairchild, D. D., of Ohio. 
Hox. Nelson Dingley, of Maine. 
Hon. Joseph R. Hawley, of Connecticut. 
Rev. Edwin B. Webb, D.D., of Massachusetts. 
Rev. Andrew L. Stone, D.D., of California. 
Rev. Edward P. Goodwin, D.D., of Illinois. 
Rev. James G. Merrill, D.D., of Missouri. 
Austin Abbott, of New York. 
Hon. Charles I. AValker, of Michigan. 
Rev. Zachary Eddy, D.D. of , Michigan. 

RECORDING SECRETARY. 
Rev. William H. Holman, of Connecticut. 

AUDITOR. 
George S. Coe, of New York. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

FOR THREE YEARS, 1888-91. 

Charles H. Parsons, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Albert Woodruff, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. James G. Roberts, D.D., of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

James Mitchell, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Asa A. Spear, of Brooklyn., N. Y. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 93 

It was doted, that the thanks of the Society be presented to Rev. 
(! eorge Leox Walker, D.D., of Connecticut, for his sermon, and that 
a copy be requested for publication. 

A request from the Plymouth Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota, 
that the next animal meeting beheld there, was referred to the Executive 
Committee: and it was voted, that said Committee hold a popular meet- 
ing in the West at such time and place as they see fit. 

A committee of the Fifth Animal Conference of the officers of National 
and State Home Missionary Societies presented the following resolutions, 
which were adopted: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SOUTHERN WORK. 

The committee appointed to prepare a minute expressing the sense of 
the meeting of officers and friends of the A. H. M. S., held in Saratoga, 
June 3d, in regard to work at the South, would report: 

We note with pleasure the harmony existing between the officers of 
the American Home Missionary Society and of the American Missionary 
Association, and heartily commend the wisdom that has jointly planned 
and prosecuted the work. We note also with pleasure that home mission- 
ary work in centers at the South, such as Atlanta, has not developed the 
difficulties which some feared, and has proved itself to be of God. We have 
listened with profound interest to the accounts given of work done by the 
missionaries of this Society in the South, and the success with which 
God has blessed them. We are impressed with the evidence of an open 
door into this comparatively new field for the American Home Mission- 
ary Society. The arising of new centers of population and trade, and 
the general expansion which marks the new South seem to constitute a 
call upon this Society to enlarge its work in this direction. 

We therefore ask the officers of this Society to consider the question 
of a greater enlargement and a more vigorous prosecution of their South- 
ern work; and we urge on our churches the duty of putting at once 
into the treasury of the Society the funds needed to meet the demand. 

It was voted, that the next annual meeting of this Society be held iu 
Saratoga, Tuesday, June 4th, 1889, at a place to be named by the 
Executive Committee in the call for said meeting. 

It was voted, that the committee of officers of the American Home 
Missionary Society, "to complete the statistics bearing on the subject of 
interference between denominations in home missionary work," be dis- 
charged. 

At 4:30 recess was taken till 7:30. 



94 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

Wednesday Evening. — Met at 7:30 in the church. After singing, 
and prayer by Rev. Theodore L. Cuylee, D.D., of New York, addresses 
were made by Hon. J. M. W. Hall, of Massachusetts; Rev. Alvin F. 
Sherrill, D.D., of Nebraska; and Rev. William G. Pltddefoot, of 
Massachusetts. 

At 9:30 the body adjourned until 8:30 A.M., Thursday, June 7th. 

Thursday Morning June 7. — At 8:30 the Society spent a half- 
hour in devotion, led by Rev. Clarence F. Swift, of New York. 

The hour from 9 to 10 was occupied by the American Congregational 
Union, President Seelye in the chair. After singing, and prayer by 
Rev. Otis Gary, of Japan, addresses were made by Rev. Levi H. Cobb, 
D.D., of New York, Secretary; Rev. John L. Maile, of Nebraska; and 
Rev. Edward D. Curtis, of Indiana. 

After singing, the Committee on the Report of the Executive Com- 
mittee presented a report with resolutions. The report was accepted, and 
the resolutions adopted, as follows: 

" Your Committee appointed to consider the Report of the Executive 
Committee of the A. II. M. S., after examining the documents sub- 
mitted to them, beg to make the following report: 

" In view of the 1,548 missionaries employed, the 130 new churches 
organized, the 59 brought to self-support, the more than 8,000 hopeful 
conversions, the more than 10,000 received into church fellowship, the 
89 young men of these churches preparing for the ministry, and the 
liquidation of the great debt of the Society: 

" Resolved, 1. That the Executive Committee have abundant reason 
to congratulate themselves and their constituents, and to return thanks 
to God for the year's work accomplished. 

" Resolved, 2. That in the work of the year we discover new grounds 
of confidence in the wisdom and ability of the Executive Committee 
and the Secretaries who have in charge the management of this great 
Society; that we urge them still to trust the Christianity of the Congre- 
gational churches, as the churches trust them; and that they go forward 
during the coming year into new and larger work with the assurance 
that they will be sustained in their moderate demand for $G50,000. 

" Resolved, 3. That the $650,000 ought to be now, and must be made 
a million at no distant day." 

The Committee on the paper of Secretary Clark presented a report, 
with a resolution. After addresses by Rev. Richard Cordley, D.D., 
of Kansas, and Rev. Robert R. Meredith, D.D., of New York, the 
report was accepted, and the resolution adopted, as follows : 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 95 

Resolved, That we have listened with profound interest to the paper of Secretary 
Clark entitled " A Crisis in Home Missions;" that we appreciate the seriousness of the 
crisis he describes; that we indorse (he appeal he makes for an advance of $100,000 as 
the least that will he at all adequate to the emergency; and we pledge ourselves, as 
much as in us lies, to co-operate with the management of the American Home Mis- 
sionary Society in securing the money needed. 

After singing, the Committee on the Paper of Secretary Barrows 
presented a report with recommendations. After addresses by Hamilton" 
\V. Mabie, of New York, and Rev. James L. Hill, of Massachusetts, 
the report was accepted and the recommendations adopted, as follows: 

I. The first recommendation is general. Whereas, for many years attention has 
been given to the introduction of religion into business, it is Resolved, that the time has 
now fully come for the introduction of business principles into our religion. 

II. Whereas, the visitation of miscellaneous persons, soliciting funds, must not be 
regarded as the presentation of a cause, it is Resolved, that the large and intelligent 
presentation of the cause of this Society is the duty of every pulpit. 

III. Whereas, our churches are now solicited by such multifarious agencies, it is 
Resolved, that we commend to our churches the duty of giving through our regularly 
recognized denominational channels. 

IV. Whereas, it is superlatively desirable that means should be used to promote 
denominational esprit de corps, and to diffuse intelligence, it is Resolved, that we ask 
of our Secretaries a consideration of the feasibility of appointing a National Day 
when the question of Home Evangelization shall be considered. 

It was voted, by rising, that a telegram of condolence in his recent 
bereavement be sent to Rev. Winfield S. Hawkes, Superintendent of 
Home Missions in Utah. 

After singing, addresses on the German Work were made by Rev. 
Moritz E. Eversz, of Wisconsin, Superintendent of the German Work, 
and by Rev. Marcus W. Montgomery, of Minnesota, Superintendent 
of the Scandinavian Work. In response to their appeal, pledges were 
given for over $2,300, and Mr. Eversz was appointed to receive the 
money. 

At 12:30 recess was taken till 2 p. m. 

Thursday Afternoon.— At 2, after singing, and prayer by Rev. 
Albert Bryant, of Massachusetts, the Congregational Sunday-school 
and Publishing Society was represented in addresses by Rev. George M. 
Boynton, of Massachusetts, Secretary; Rev. Henry C. Simmons, of 
Dakota; and Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., of Massachusetts. 

After singing, addresses were made by the following representatives 
from the field; Rev. Leroy Warren, of Michigan; Rev. Edward D. 
Curtis, of Indiana; Rev. Sullivan F. Gale, of Florida; Rev. John H. 
Morley, of Minnesota; Rev. JohnL. Maile, of Nebraska; Rev. Henry 



96 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

C. Simmons, of North Dakota; Rev. James H. Warren, D.D., of 
California; and the Scandinavian Work was presented by its Superintend- 
ent, Rev. Marcus W. Montgomery, of Minnesota. 

At 5:30 recess was taken till 7:30. 

Thursday Evening — At 7:30, after singing, and prayer by Rev. 
Charles Wadsworth, of Massachusetts, the Minutes of Wednesday after- 
noon and evening, and Thursday morning and afternoon were approved, 
and the Recording Secretary was authorized to complete the Minutes at 
the close of the evening session. 

It was voted, That the Minutes and the report of the Executive Com- 
mittee, including the papers read by Secretaries Clark and Barrows, be 
printed; and also other papers, addresses and reports, at the discretion of 
said Committee. 

The Business Committee made a report, which was accepted, and 
the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the thanks of the American Home Missionary Society are due, and 
and are hereby paid, to the various Railroad and Steamboat Companies which have 
given commutation fares; to hotel proprietors and boarding-house keepers, who 
have made special rates for attendants on these meetings; to the Trustees of the Meth- 
odist Church of Saratoga, for the use of their beautiful edifice; to the New England 
Church of Saratoga for various effective services rendered; to the Saratoga Press for 
excellent reports; to A. S. Barnes and Company, of N. Y., for selections from their 
hymn-book; to Miss Marion Vincent Ellis, of Brooklyn, for most effective leadership 
in our service of song; and to the Rev. Julius H. Seelye, D.D., for the manner in 
which he has presided over the meetings. 

Addresses were made by Rev. Clark C. Otis, of New York, Finan- 
cial Superintendent; Rev. Charles T). Barrows, D.D., of California; 
Rev. Charles 0. Brown, of Iowa, and Rev. Albert H. Plumb, D.D., 

of Massachusetts. 

Prayer was offered and the benediction was pronounced by Rev. Alex- 
ander McKenzie, D.D., of Massachusetts, and at 9.45 the meeting was 
dissolved. 

William H. Holman, 

Recording Secretary. 
William H. Moore, 
Assistant Recording Secretary. 



1888. THE HOME MISSION-ART. 97 

MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

The Executive Committee met on Wednesday, June 13th, at the Society's Rooms, 
Bible House, Astor Place, N. Y., and duly elected the following Execu- 
tive officers: 

HONORARY SECRETARY: 

Rev. David B. Coe, D.D. 

SECRETARIES FOR CORRESPONDENCE: 

Rsv. Walter M. Barrows. D.D. 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. 

TREASURER. 
Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D. 



M THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 



SIXTY-SECOND REPORT. 



With sad hearts, yet with unfailing trust in the wisdom and love of 
the Giver and Disposer of life, the Executive Committee are called to 
open this Report with a record of the decease of one of their most valued 
associates, Mr. Alfred Smith Barnes. He died at his home in Brooklyn, 
after a painful illness of five months, on the 17th of February, 1888, aged 
71 years and 20 days. 

Mr. Barnes was born in New Haven, Conn., and passed Ins boyhood 
there. At sixteen years of age he began his bookstore life in Hartford. 
He came with his employers to this city in 1835, and commenced busi- 
ness for himself at his majority, thus early laying the strong foundations 
of the publishing house which for almost half a century has been one of 
the best known and most respected, not in this city alone, but through- 
out the country. The great prosperity that followed his efforts was chiefly 
valued by Mr. Barnes for the opportunity it gave to take active part in 
the religious, charitable, and educational movements of his time, partic- 
ularly in New York and Brooklyn, his business and domestic homes. 
An intelligent and consistent Congregationalist, there is scarcely a 
church (if there be one) of our sisterhood in Brooklyn and vicinity, which 
his hand has not borne part in planting and fostering, nor one of our benev- 
olent institutions which he has not systematically, steadily, and liberally 
aided. 

Mr. Barnes was elected a member of this Executive Committee in 
1879; was at once appointed on its sub-committee of Finance, and most 
acceptably and usefully served in both capacities until his death. 

The high place which his faithfulness earned for him in the Commit- 
tee's esteem appears from the following Minute passed at the stated meet- 
ing of March 7, 1888, and published in The Home Missionary for April 
last: 

" Our Heavenly Father having, since the last meeting of this Com- 
mittee, taken unto himself the soul of our departed friend and associate, 
Mr. Alfred S. Barnes, we desire to place on record our appreciation of 
the rare qualities of mind and heart which pre-eminently fitted him for a 
place of so great responsibility and usefulness. 

" Mr. Barnes was consecrated to the work of Christ in all it branches, 
and in every land. But his wide acquaintance with our country, its vast 
extent, resources and possibilities,- its manifest call to be a chosen instru- 



1888. Till: HOME MISSIONARY. W 

ment of God for the conversion of the world, roused his enthusiasm. 
His keen sense of its perils from many sources, and his deep conviction 
that its safety lay wholly in its loyal allegiance to God and his truth, 
made him intensely earnest in giving the pure Gospel to all our people, 
whether home-born or Eoreign-born, and whatever their color or comlj- 
tion. To this work, during his nine years of service on this Executive 
Committee and its Finance Committee, Mr. Barnes gave freely of his 
money, his time, his business skill, and his prayers. His faith and cour- 
age helped us in the darkest hours; his known integrity and prudence 
strengthened the confidence of others in the wise management of the 
Society's affairs; his genial spirit won our affection and makes his depart- 
ure a serious loss to us, compensated only by the knowledge that it 
brought to 1 1 i m immeasurable gain. 

" As a tribute to his dear and pleasant memory, we inscribe this Min- 
ute on our records, and by it would convey to his bereaved family our 
hearty sympathy with them in a loss, the magnitude of which our 
knowledge of their beloved earthly head enables us in some degree to 
measure, while we prayerfully commend them each and all to the Father 
of heavenly consolation." 

The Society has also been called to mourn the loss of one of its most 
distinguished Vice-Presidents, Ex-Governor Horace Fairbanks, of Ver- 
mont. He died in Xew Vork City, March IT, 1888, of pneumonia caused 
by exposure in the memorable storm of that week. Belonging to a family 
known in many lands for its business enterprise and integrity, and at home 
not less for its munificence to educational and religious institutions, and 
particularly to Home and Foreign Missions, he was second, perhaps, to 
neither of its members in the consecration of time, money, and per- 
sonal influence.to these great interests. 

Like his father, Governor Erastus Fairbanks, he was for some years 
President of the Vermont Domestic Missionary Society, and that 
Auxiliary is Largely indebted to his sagacious counsels and liberal contribu- 
tions. In 18S4 he was elected to the Vice-Presidency of this Society, a 
position which his revered father had vacated, just twenty years before, 
by reason of death. On the roll of this Society's honored dead, both 
names will perpetuate the memory of lives conspicuous for Christian 
work and Christian giving. 

Of the beloved workers in our fields thirteen have died since the last 
report — a most unusual number, and among these several whom our 
churches far and wide had come to know and esteem: Rev. Messrs. John 
Le Boscjuet, in Massachusetts; Gurilon W. Xoyes, William P. Hammond, 
and J. S. Burgess, in Connecticut; John McKean, in Florida; Bichard 
M. Burgess and Danforth L. Eaton, in Michigan; Benjamin F. Haskins 
and Wilson D. Webb, in Kansas; Christian Mowery, in Minnesota; 
Emanuel Jose, in Dakota; Xelson F. Cobleigh and John E. Elliot, in 
Washington Territory. 



100 THE HOME MIS SI OX ART. July, 

The years of ministerial service of eleven of these departed brethren, 
the date of whose ordination is known, are just 300 — an average of twenty- 
seven and a quarter years — the longest service being fifty-two years, and 
the shortest, ten years. 

SUMMARY OF RESULTS. 

The number of ministers of the Gospel in the service of the Society the 
last year, whose names are found in the General Table in the full report, 
together with those engaged in superintending the work, is 1,620. 
(Deducting 30 reported in more than one State, 1,584.) Of these, 1,223 
were in commission at the date of the last report, and 361 have since been 
appointed. 

They have been employed in 42 States and Territories, as follows: In 
Maine, 99; New Hampshire, 65; Vermont, 57; Massachusetts, 104; Rhode 
Island, 10; Connecticut, 52; New York, 74; Xew Jersey, 7: Pennsylvania, 
25; Maryland, 2; District of Columbia, 2; Virginia, 3; West Virginia, 1; 
Louisiana, 1; Georgia, 4; Arkansas, 13; Florida, 28; Texas, 8; Indian 
Territory, 19; Tennessee, 3; Ohio, 47; Indiana, 11; Illinois, 60; Missouri, 
48; Michigan, 131; Wisconsin, 72; Iowa, 80; Minnesota, 92; Kansas, 102; 
Nebraska, 90; Dakota, 108; Colorado, 29; Wyoming, 8; Montana, 4: 
New Mexico, 12; Utah, 12; Nevada, 1; Idaho, 1; Arizona, 4; California, 
76; Oregon, 20; Washington Territory, 35; in all, 1,620. Of these 36, 
having labored in more than one State, are in this enumeration twice 
counted. The total number of individual missionaries employed is 
1,584. 

This distribution, retaining the twice counted, gives to the New Eng- 
land States, 387; Middle States, J.10; Southern States, 40; Southwestern 
States, 104; on the Pacific Coast, 131; Western States and Territories, 
848. 

Of the whole number in commission, 810 have been pastors or stated 
supplies of single congregations; 503 have ministered to two or three 
congregations each; and 271 have extended their labors over still wider 
fields. 

The aggregate of ministerial labor performed is 1,173 years. 

The number of congregations and missionary districts which have 
been fully supplied, or where the Gospel has been preached at stated 
intervals, is 3,084. 

Five missionaries have been in commission as pastors or stated supplies 
of congregations of colored people, and 144 have preached in foreign 
languages: 26 to Welsh congregations; 35 to German congregations; 45 
to Scandinavian congregations; 1 to a Dane congregation; 23 to Bohemian 
congregations; 1 to a Spanish congregation; 2 to Chinese congregations; 2 
to Indian congregations; 6 to French congregations; and 3 to Mexican 
congregations. 

The number of Sunday -school and Bible-class scholars is not far 



1888. THE HOME MISSIOXARY. 101 

from 130,000. The organization of 288 new schools is reported, and 
the number under the special care of missionaries is 2,205. 

The contributions to benevolent objects, reported by 786 missionaries, 
amount to $35,641.10. 

One hundred and seven missionaries make mention of revivals of relig- 
ion during the year, some of them reporting 400, 150, 100, 95, 75, 72, 
67, 65, 59, 53 and 51 hopeful conversions. In 187 instances the number 
of reported converts exceeds 10, and the number reported by 629 mission- 
aries is 8,120. 

The additions to the churches, as nearly as can be ascertained, have 
been 10,012 — viz.: 6,310 on confession of faith, and 3,702 by letters from 
other churches. 

One hundred and thirty churches have been organized, in connection 
with the labors of the missionaries, within the year, and 59 have assumed 
the entire support of their own Gospel ordinances. 

One hundred and sixteen houses of worship have been completed, 149 
materially repaired or improved, and the building of many others com- 
menced. Fifteen chapels are reported as having been built within the 
year, and 33 parsonages have been provided. Eighty-seven men, in 
connection with the missionary churches, are reported as in different 
stages of preparation for the Gospel ministry. 

THE TEEASUEY. 

Resources.— The balance in the treasury, April 1st, 1887, was 
85,155.89. The receipts for the succeeding twelve months have been 
$548,729.87; making the resources for the year $550,885.76. 

Liabilities. — There was due to missionaries, at the close of last year, 
$4,753.03. There has since become due $508,448.48, making the to- 
tal liabilities $513,201.51. 

Payments. — Of this sum, $511,641.56 have been ]">aid, leaving 
$41,159.95 still due to the missionaries for labor performed. In addi- 
tion to these past dues, appropriations already made, and daily becoming 
due, amount to $78,395.12; making the total of pledges $79,955.07, 
toward canceling which there was a balance in the Treasury, March 31st, 
of $9,244.20, after deducting $30,000 paid to the Swett Exigency Fund. 

COMPARATIVE RESULTS. 

The roll of commissioned workers shows a gain of 15 over that of 
the previous year, with 56 more years of labor, and 21 more jjreaching 
stations statedly supplied. Eight more have preached in foreign lan- 
guages. Besides the regular stations a large number of congregations 
and preaching-places have been ministered to by the missionaries occa- 
sionally, as their time and strength allowed. In these settlements thus 
irregularly supplied hundreds of prayer-meetings and circles for Bible 



102 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

study have been organized, that will ripen into churches. The reported 
number of conversions is larger by 64, though the additions to the 
missionary, churches, on confession, were fewer by 159; by letter 140 more 
than last year. There has been a slight gain in the number of Sunday- 
schools formed, and in the number of scholars cared for in them. Four 
more houses of worship have been built than in the year before, and 
eleven more young men were studying for the ministry. The cash re- 
ceipts into the treasury exceeded tbose of the Sixty-first year by 
$65,750.27. This comparison of results, with many others not here 
given, shows that the friends of Home Missions have unusual occasion 
for thankfulness to God, for special favors vouchsafed within the year. 

THE WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 

The number of State organizations is now twenty, of which five were 
formed within the year. Others are known to be forming. About 1,100 
local auxiliaries are more or less actively co-operating with the State bodies. 
This department of the Society's work is evidently growing rapidly in 
favor with the devoted women of our churches, whose liberal devisings 
for Home Missions can no longer be limited to the furnishing of clothing, 
books, and other " box supplies." Of these there is no lack, the wants 
of a missionary household having only to be made known to set at work, 
somewhere, a circle of warm hearts and busy hands. 

But, besides these, many of our Ladies' Societies are taking up with 
steadily increasing zeal and efficiency the work of raising the whole or a 
large part of the salary of some selected missionary, perhaps once a mem- 
ber of their church, or related to some of its families by ties of kindred 
or personal friendship. What more beautiful and permanently interest- 
ing form of serving the Master in the person of one of his " brethren" 
can there be than this ? The officers of the Society will always be ready to 
assign to the Ladies' Circle of a church or town, on application, a missionary 
of such circle's own choosing,f or whom they may pledge his entire appropria- 
tion, or the half, the third, the quarter of it, according to their ability and 
willingness. The correspondence resulting from such a relation, of ten of 
great mutual advantage, can hardly fail to deepen the interest of an entire 
church or community in the work and its workers. Nor is this form of 
help by any means confined to women's organizations. More and more 
are individual women, trusted of the Lord with property, coming to 
prize the privilege of using it for Him. Several of them have this year 
sent to the Treasury, anonymously or otherwise, offerings of $1,000 or 
$500 each, for payment of missionary salaries. Will not many more 
imitate their bright example? The Ladies' Missionary Association 
(Boston) has kept up its valued aid, as in previous years, by contributing 
from its treasury $1,050 for the support of four female teachers in the 
Indian Territory and Arkansas. Very many ladies have also continued 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 103 

to help on the work hy procuring subscribers to The Home Missionary, 
circulating that remarkable volume Our < 'ountry — now past its hundredth 
thousand — and other publications of the Society. 

Mrs. II. M. Shelton, who for four years and a half acceptably served 
the Society as Secretary of the Woman's Department, and tinder whose 
supervision several of the earlier State organizations were formed, resigned 
that position on the 1st of October, 1887. For tlie present its duties are 
the care of Mrs. II. S. Caswell, Editor of The Home Missionary. 

THE SUNDAY-SCHOOLS. 

The number of new schools organized within the year now reported, 
is 288. Under the care of the missionaries and their helpers, there are 
% 205 schools, with 129,462 scholars receiving regular instruction, most 
of them following the International series of lessons. So strong is the hold 
which this vitally important branch of their work has upon the mission- 
aries, that many of them have, besides one school at each regular preach- 
ing station, several in the neighborhoods less frecpiently visited. These 
are kept alive and vigorous in the interval, by some lover of children 
and youth, in the nearest church or station best rpialified for the work ; 
so that, if possible to prevent it, no school formed by those bearing this 
Society's commission shall be left to die for lack of careful oversight. 
Taught by the experience of others, our brethren decline to plant schools 
where there is not fair prospect of the culture necessary to fruitful life — 
a fact that accounts for the relatively slow growth in numbers in this 
department for the last year or two. There surely is no abatement, but 
a great increase, rather, in the missionaries' sense of the high place that 
should be given to wise and faithful Sunday-school labor, among the 
safeguards of our country } s welfare. Once more we gratefully acknow- 
ledge .our obligations to the Congregational Sunday-school and Publishing 
Society for books, lesson-helps, and the like, which have materially aided 
our brethren. We trust the friends of Home Missionary Sunday-schools 
will keep the treasury of that Society well supplied. 

OUE PUBLICATIONS. 

The Society's well-known organ of communication with its friends, 
The Home Missionary, now in its sixty-first volume, is receiving more 
careful attention than ever. No pains is spared by its editor to secure 
from the superintendents, missionaries, and all concerned in the work, 
the best attainable material for every number; best, i.e., for the one fixed 
purpose of the magazine — the giving of information as to the state, pro- 
gress, needs, promise, and methods of the work; enlarging the acquaint- 
ance of the abler churches with the workers in the field ; setting forth 
the motives for fostering, and the dangers that must attend the slighting 
of the work in hand; and arousing the Christian public to take up and 



104 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

keep up the enterprise so largely blessed hitherto, aud bear it on, with 
the Divine help, to the most glorious issue. 

The magazine has been still further enlarged, with the opening of the 
sixty-first volume, and now gives forty-four pages of reading matter, 
monthly. It has also been improved externally, in the quality of its 
paper and print. The circulation for the year was 317,840 copies, an 
average monthly issue of 26,487. That these are eagerly read by many 
thousands of intelligent Christian people is shown by our correspondence 
and the contributions to the Treasury. 

" Our Country" still maintains its hold on the reading public, as is 
clear from the fact that more than 100,000 copies have been already 
issued, and the call for the work shows little sign of abatement. Mr. 
Montgomery's book in the interest of our work among the Scandinavians, 
is still in steady demand. The number of leaflets, most of them in a 
form for enclosure in letter envelopes, and all sure to interest the friends 
of Home Missions, has now reached seventy-one, with more in prepara- 
tion. A priced catalogue of these will be sent, free, to every applicant. 
Nobody will give much to a cause of which he knows little. 

FAMILY SUPPLIES. 

The supply of " Missionary boxes" this year has been ample to meet 
all requests for that form of help. The number of packages acknowl- 
edged — by no means all that have been sent — is 722, or 16 more than 
last year. The value of 662 of these packages, at the low estimate of 
their donors, is $61,669.06. Reckoning those unesti mated at the average 
rate of the others, we have a total value of $67,259. We have no fear of 
a f alling-off of these supplies that shall leave any missionary family with- 
out help in time of heed. Notice of such deficiency is sure of prompt, 
cheerful, and liberal response from those who have so long stood by us 
with a form of help that has carried comfort to thousands of homes, and 
has kept bright the link of loving fellowship between the churches of the 
East and those of the "West. The need and the profit of this helpful 
fellowship will never cease. 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



105 



DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES BY SECTIONS. 



The following Table gives the 


lumber of missionaries, earn 


year <>f the Societ 


's operations, in 


graphical divisions of Eastern, Middle, Southern and Western States; and 


also in ( 'anada. 








Southern and 


WeSt'n Stales 






Society s Year, be- 


New England 


Middle States. 


Southwestern 


and Terri- 


Cai 


lada. Total. 


ginning 1836. 


States. 




States. 


tories. 






1— '26-'27 


1 


129 


5 


33 




1 169 


3— '27-28 


5 


130 


9 


:><; 




201 


3— '28-'29 


72 


127 


23 


80 




2 304 


4— •29-30 


107 


147 


13 


122 




3 392 


5_'30_'3l 


144 


160 


12 


145 




2 463 


6— '31-32 


163 


169 


10 


166 




1 509 


7— '32-'33 


289 


170 


9 


is:, 




3 606 


B—'33-'34 


287 


201 


13 


169 




6 676 


9_'34_'35 


289 


216 


18 


187 




9 719 


10— '35-'36 


319 


219 


11 


191 




i5 755 


11 — :;•:>- :IT 


331 


227 


11 


195 




22 7sr, 


12— '37-38 


288 


198 


8 


166 




24 684 


13— '38-'39 


284 


198 


9 


160 




14 665 


14— '39-'40 


290 


205 


6 


167 




12 680 


15_»40-'41 


292 


215 


5 


169 




9 690 


16— '41-42 


305 


249 


5 


222 




10 791 . 


17— '42-43 


288 


253 


7 


291 




9 848 


18_'43-'44 


268 


257 


10 


365 




7 907 


19— '44-'45 


285 


249 


6 


397 




6 943 


20— '45-'46 


274 


271 


9 


417 




971 


21— 46-'47 


275 


254 


10 


433 




972 


22— '47-48 


295 


237 


18 


456 




1,006 


23— '48-49 


302 


239 


15 


463 ' 




1,019 


24—49-50 


301 


228 


15 


488 




1,032 


25— '50-'51 


311 


224 


15 


515 




1,065 


26— '51-52 


305 


213 


14 


530 




1,065 


27— 52-'53 


313 


215 


12 


547 




1.087 


28— '53-'54 


292 


214 


11 


530 




1,047 


29— f54-'55 


278 


207 


10 


537 




1,032 


30— '55-'56 


276 


198 


8 


504 




986 


31— '56-'57 


271 


191 


6 


506 




974 


82— '57-58 


291 


197 


3 


521 




1,012 


33_'58-'59 


319 


201 




534 




1,054 


34— *59-'60 


327 


199 






581 




1,107 


3.5— '60-61 


308 


181 






573 




1,062 


36— 61-62 


. 295 


87 






481 




863 


37— '62-63 


281 


48 






405 




734 


3.8— '6:3-64 


289 


44 






423 




756 


39— '64-65 


293 


58 






451 




802 


40— '65-66 


283 


64 


4 


467 




818 


4l_'66-'67 


284 


66 


5 


491 




846 


42— '67-68 


307 


73 


7 


521 




908 


43— '68-69 


327 


73 


8 


564 




972 


44— '69-70 


311 


71 


6 


556 




944 


45— '70-71 


296 


69 


5 


570 




940 


46— '71-72 


308 


62 


3 


588 




961 


47— '72-73 


312 


49 


3 


587 




951 


48— '73-74 


310 


58 


7 


594 




969 


49— '74-75 


292 


67 


7 


586 




952 


50— '75-76 


304 


72 


8 


595 




979 


51— '76-'77 


303 


70 


6 


617 




996 


52— '77-78 


316 


70 


6 


604 




996 


53_T8-'79 


312 


57 


10 


567 




946 


54— '79-80 


327 


57 


9 


622 




1.015 


55— '80-'81 


321 


62 


9 


640 




1.032 


56— '81-82 


328 


56 


17 


669 




1,070 


57— '82-'83 


326 


68 


61 


695 




1,150 


58— '83-84 


334 


77 


63 


868 




1,342 


59_'84-'85 


349 


93 


123 


882 




1,447 


60— 'S5-'86 


368 


99 


134 


868 




1,469 


61— 86-'87 


375 


103 


143 


950 




1,571 


62— '87-'88 


387 


' 110 


144 


979 




1,620 



10G THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES BY STATES. 



















Eastern States. 


States. 


Southern States. 


E-i 


'5 

_ 


^ 


Society V Year 
beginning 

1826. 


o 


a. 

s 

33 

B 


o 

£ 


a) 

X 

S3 

Xi 


"3 

5 


3 

o 


M 

u 

o 

> 




=■ 


M 


5 


o 
_ 


ti 


- 
ti 




<3 

C 




si 
'3 






1 


si 

B 

p 


'- 

a 
- 


- 




V 

Eh 

S3 

o 




3 
^ 


B 


> 


a 


M 


O 




fc 


~ 


- 


s 


fi 


!> 


£ 


fc 


X 




< 


8 





<fe 


h 




v. 


~ 
3 


1_<o,;_-o7 


..... 
40 


2 

2 


1 
2 

29 








120 
120 

117 


1 
! 


V 




-- 


2 


1 
2 

3 




1 

3 
6 


2 

S 


"3 


"l 
<* 


-- 


1 

2 




2 
1 
2 


- 








2— '27-28 










3— '28-'29.__. 


i 








4— '29-'30..._ 


47 


29 


27 




3 


1 


133 


1 


13 












4 


1 


2 




















5— '30-'31.... 


54 


31 


35 




3 


21 


148 


2 


n 








o 




3 


2 




2 


1 


x 




1 










6— '31-'32._._ 


02 


40 


32 


1 


3 


25 


157 


■> 


li 












2 


1 


1 


3 


1 
















7— '®-'88— . 


66 


50 


38 


55 


4 


26 


151 


•". 


16 








2 




1 






4 




1 




', 










8— '33- , 34.... 


83 


63 


42 


62 


3 


34 


177 


a 


20 


1 






3 




2 






6 








1 










9— '34-'35.— 


H! 


49 


42 


68 


6 


37 


185 


6 


...> 


3 


1 




4 




•' 




3 


4 


•> 




i 




1 








10— , 35-'36 .... 


90 


59 


53 


71 


ti 


10 


183 


5 


20 


2 


1 




3 




1 




1 


1 


4 




2 












11— '36- - 37.... 


107 


63 


50 


74 




37 


186 


6 


34 


1 


1 




5 




1 




1 




3 




1 












12— '37-38.... 


71 


56 


52 


76 




33 


161 


7 


29 


1 


2 




2 








a 


1 


3 
















13— '.SS-^... 


70 


48 


47 


80 


.) 


34 


148 


(j 


(1 


1 


:; 




3 








i 


1 


1 
















]4_'39-40.... 


71 


55 


51 


73 


2 


38 


165 


12 


27 


1 


2 












i 




1 
















15— '40- , 41.„. 


74 


47 


50 


82 


4 


35 


167 


11 


■;.- 


o 


1 
























1 








16— VH-Ma.... 


73 


50 


54 


83 


3 


42 


187 


11 


1!) 


■_• 


1 


1 


l 




2 




i 








1 




1 








17— , 43- , 43..„ 


68 


47 


53 


78 


3 


39 


193 


in 


17 


3 


1 


1 


1 




;_ 




i 








1 












18— '43- '44.... 


75 


42 


40 


64 


5 


42 


201 


10 


II 


2 


2 


1 


2 








i 


1 






1 




1 








19— '44-'45.... 


82 


45 


39 


66 


7 


46 


188 


ID 


51 




1 


1 


1 




1 






1 






1 




1 








20— '45- '46.... 


80 


45 


45 


56 


8 


49 


211 


6 


53 


1 


1 


1 


4 




1 




i 


1 






1 


1 










21— "46-'47_... 


86 


44 


43 


60 


6 


36 


198 


7 


17 


2 


a 


1 


3 




1 




i 


1 






1 












22— '47-'48.... 


91 


46 


45 


62 


10 


41 


187 


1 


45 


1 


3 


a 


-' 








s 


1 










1 








23— '48-'49._.. 


89 


41 


50 


67 


10 


45 


186 


1 


19 




4 


2 








i 












1 








24— '49- '50.... 


92 


40 


58 


60 





45 


173 


6 


tr 


2 


1 


2 


!• 




a 




2 












1 








25— '50-'51.... 


91 


46 


.61 


61 


7 


45 


170 


11 


12 


1 


2 


1 


1 




jj 




1 




















26— '51-'52.... 


96 


44 


60 


54 


7 


44 


157 


in 


14 


•> 


1 


i 


s 








1 




















87— 'sa-'ss.... 


101 


46 


58 


54 


9 


45 


158 


9 


15 


3 




1 


( 








1 








1 












28— 'SS-^.... 


93 


44 


57 


46 


10 


42 


154 


10 


14 


2 


• > 


1 


b 








1 








1 












29— ^'SS.... 


92 


48 


45 


43 


7 


43 


146 


11 


111 


1 


1 


1 


\ 








1 








1 












3#— '5.5- '56.... 


97 


43 


43 


42 


7 


44 


137 


13 


is 








H 




























31— '56- '57.... 


91 


43 


53 


38 


6 


40 


133 


12 


Hi 








6 





























32— '57-'58.... 


91 


45 


77 


34 


8 


36 


133 


11 


18 


1 






3 




























33— '5S--59.... 


92 


45 


97 


38 


8 


39 


135 


12 


53 


1 


































34— '59-'60_... 


81 


52 


99 


43 


8 


44 


1?8 


12 


is 


1 


































35— '60- '61.... 


88 


51 


75 


44 


8 


44 


121 


12 


i; 


1 


































36— '61-'62.... 


88 


39 


64 


47 


8 


49 


80 


a 


4 




































37— '62- '63.... 


82 


39 


60 


45 


6 


49 




>> 






































38— '63-'64.... 


77 


34 


58 


m 


6 


54 


42 





2 






































39— '64-'65.... 


77 


39 


61 


59 


5 


52 


53 




5 




































40— '65-'66.... 


78 


39 


53 


61 


7 


45 


58 


l 


5 












i 




1 






1 






1 








41— T,0-'67__._ 


82 


38 


65 


63 


6 


30 


57 


2 


6 








2 





l 




1 












1 








42— '67-'68.... 


94 


45 


66 


61 


4 


37 


57 


4 


12 








2 


_. 


l 








1 


1 






1 








43— 'G8-'69.... 


85 


48 


79 


70 


6 


36 


57 


5 


11 








3 












1 


2 






1 








44— '69-70.. .. 


89 


42 


65 


74 


6 


34 


55 


7 


9 








■•; 












1 


1 


.. 




1 








45—70-71.... 


95 


38 


00 


64 


6 


33 


52 


7 


in 








3 












1 








1 








46— '71-72.... 


110 


35 


58 


61 


8 


36 


49 


7 


6 








3 




























47— *re- , 78..:. 


102 


39 


57 


66 


7 


41 


39 


7 


3 






_. 


2 


1 


























48— , 73- , 74 


110 


39 


51 


65 


6 


39 


47 


5 


6 








a 


2 












1 






2 








49— 74-75.... 


82 


45 


45 


66 


6 


48 


53 


5 


9 








i 


2 












1 




1 


2 








50— '75-76 .... 


90 


47 


49 


73 


6 


39 


51 


8 


13 








i 


2 












1 




1 


2 








51—76-77.... 


77 


49 


48 


81 


6 


42 


51 


9 


Ki 








i 


2 


















•> 


1 






52—77-78.... 


83 


49 


57 


76 


7 


44 


57 


6 


7 








i 


2 


















• > 


1 






53—78-79.... 


86 


49 


55 


71 


7 


44 


47 


6 


4 








2 


2 
















1 


1 


1 






54—79-80.... 


82 


55 


61 


76 


8 


45 


45 


7 


5 








2 


1 
















1 


2 


1 






55— -80-'81.... 


82 


69 


53 


75 


8 


44 


51 


li 


6 








1 


1 
















1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


56— '81-'82.... 


95 


59 


53 


75 


7 


30 


43 


r> 


7 








1 


1 














3 


1 


4 


4 


2 


1 


57— '82-'83_... 


89 


64 


52 


72 


10 


39 


46 


5 


15 








1 


2 






1 








3 


3 


1 


5 


2 


2 


58— '83-'84_... 


94 


62 


53 


83 


8 


40 


53 


4 


23 








1 


2 






8 








6 


10 


13 


13 


7 


3 


59— '84-'85_.._ 


104 


66 


55 


88 


7 


40 


67 


S 


is 






1 


2 


3 






12 








10 


16 


14 


16 


6 


5 


60— '85- '86.... 


103 


64 


60 


97 


9 


46 


71 


4 


23 






1 


1 


1 






9 








11 


21 i 


15 


16 


9 


4 


61— '86-87... 


99 


65 


62 


97 


10 


50 


67 


7 


•23 






3 


2 2 






7 






1 


IS 


26 


7 


15 


11 


4 


62— '87-'88_.„ 


99 


65 


57 


64 


10 


52 


74 


7 


25 


— 


2 


2 


3 1 


-- 


— 


4 


— 




1 


13 


28 


8 


19 


12 


4 



Each State is here given credit for services of minister, though he may have served in other States. 

Remarks on the Tables. — 1. At the organization of the A.'H. M. S., in 1826, the missionaries of 
the United Domestic Missionary Society, whose responsibilities it assumed, were transferred to it, and 
the greater portion of them were in commission in the State of New York. 

2 The Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, the New Hampshire Home Missionary Society, 
and the Vermont Domestic Missionary Society became integral parts of the National Society in the 
second year of its operations; the Maine Missionary Society in the third year, and the Connecticut 
Missionary Society, in the sixth year. 

3. In 1845, the missions of this Society in Canada were, by an amicable arrangement with the Brit- 
ish Colonial Missionary Society, transferred to the care of that Institution. 

4. In the Table will be seen the progress which has been made, year by year, in the newer States 
of the West, as they have severally come into being, and presented fields of peculiar promise for mis- 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES UY STATES. 



107 





South'n 




















States. 








Western States and Territories. 




Society's 














































year, 












































a 


beginning 


6 


>> 










a 


.5 




tj 




OS 




o 

-a 

05 
u 

o 

"3 
o 


tb 










03 




o 


1826. 


a 

a 

<u 
Eh 


a 


d 

c 


03 

a 

05 

3 


°3 

a 


s 
o 


ci 
to 

2 

9 


a 
o 
u 







o 

a 
a 


a 
a 
M 


a 
o 


03 



MS 

a 

a 


- 
1 




- 
a 

c 

-. 




n 
us 

OS 

■- 
'A 


: 

oj 


a 
u 

c 

"3 
O 


- 
z 

- 

5 


p 
a 


1— , 36- , 87_._. 


o 


4 


16 


8 


o 


3 


4 


















8— '37-'S8_.... 


8 


4 


87 


9 


3 


5 


5 
































3— '28-29... _ 


8 


3 


IS 


12 


8 


6 


5 
































4— '29-'30._.. 


7 


5 


64 


18 


12 


6 


10 
































5_-30-3] ... 


5 


9 


5 I 


88 


17 


5 


12 
































6—31-32 .. 


7 


13 


\ I 


21 


80 


12 


10 
































7— , 88-»88.„. 


11 


13 


S.I 


86 


28 


12 


20 
































B_ '88-'84 


10 


11 


68 


89 


24 


13 


16 
































9— '34-85 


13 


7 


8.". 


86 


89 


10 


16 
































10— '35-'30..._ 


12 


9 


80 


21 


38 


12 


11 


1 


2 




























11— 30-'37.... 


12 


7 


72 


31 


31 


9 


29 


1 


2 




























12— '37-38.... 


7 


.... 


(it 


89 


87 


14 


22 


2 


1 




























18— '88-'89 


6 




56 


86 


31 


12 


22 


3 


3 




























li 89-'40 


7 




54 


85 


39 


9 


'.'1 


6 


3 




























15— '40-' 4 1 


B 




53 


21 


12 


5 


86 


s 































10— "41 


8 


.... 


66 


34 


50 


6 


36 


10 


12 




























17_'42_'43.... 


6 




75 


88 


65 


80 


46 


28 


16 




























18— '43-'44._. 


4 


3 


91 


86 


87 


21 


68 


30 


29 




























19— '44-'45 


3 


7 


99 


40 


95 


20 


65 


31 


28 




























BO '45-46.... 


6 


6 


{03 


51 


98 


85 


67 


30 


21 




























21— '40-47.. _. 


6 

6 
6 


8 
9 

7 
6 


95 
102 
94 
97 
93 


59 

52 
51' 

50 
59 


98 

101 
110 
114 
119 


81 

21 
25 
33 
29 


80 
73 
74 

so 


II 
49 
58 
03 
72 


39 
35 

33 
37 
41 
























2 
2 
2 
2 

2 




SB— , 47-"48.... 


























23— -48-40.... 






















2 
3 
4 




84_'49- , 50 


2 

4 


— 




















25— '50-51 




















26— '51 -'52 


5 


6 


93 


63 


117 


29 


77 


84 


50 


4 





















2 


3 




87- .2-'53_... 


5 
3 
4 


6 
6 
1 


96 
110 
101 


58 
43 
85 


118 
105 

102 


30 
28 

•Jl 


80 
76 

77 


S3 
87 
100 


55 
50 
G3 


6 

8 
10 


— 


















6 
7 
12 


4 
5 
5 




28— "53-"54... 






— 














89— '54-'55 


3 








80— '55-50 


2 


1 


80 


36 


93 


21 


72 


87 


73 


14 


3 


~r 
















13 


8 




81— '.-.0-57.... 


1 


1 


76 


33 


88 


10 


68 


84 


87' 


24 


3 


2 
















15 


s 




32— '57-7-8 




1 


76 


3s 


82 


5 


65 


93 


90 


33 


12 


2 
















10 


S 




33— ■.\<-'.-;i 




1 


77 


29 


93 




65 


102 


102 


34 


11 


4 
















6 


7 




34— '59- '00 




2 


79 


89 


100 




08 


10S 


115 


41 


17 


5 
















10 


7 




85— '00-'01 




3 


75 


21 


89 


"S 


71 


100 


127 


46 


16 


5 
















12 


6 




86— r.i-'C2 






54 


15 


83 


8 


59 


83 


103 


45 


18 


4 
















12 


4 




37— '62-'63 






38 
38 


5 

5 


83 
94 


2 
2 


68 
63 


70 
73 


81 
79 


34 
38 


12 
15 


3 
5 


.... 


~ l" 












5 
8 


4 
3 




3S_T>3-'04 








89— "64-'65 


■ 


37 


7 


95 


4 


70 


68 


98 


35 


15 


7 




2 












10 


3 




40— ■(i.vci', 


2 




33 


7 


78 


19 


67 


72 


104 


35 


17 


9 




3 






1 






17 


3 




41— '00-'07 


2 




3S 


4 


78 


25 


71 


71 


103 


41 


19 


10 


.... 


4 






1 






18 









1 




43 


5 


86 


31 


73 


64 


110 


40 


23 


12 




4 












25 


4 




43— "08-'09 


1 




40 


7 


86 


32 


85 


68 


125 


41 


33 


11 


2 


3 












20 


5 




44_'69-T0 


1 




34 


9 


72 


36 


77 


76 


124 


41 


39 


14 


1 


1 


1 










21 


5 




45_-ro--;i.... 


1 




30 


10 


71 


42 


07 


77 


112 


40 


60 


18 


2 


2 


1 










80 


6 


l 


46— '71-'72.__. 


2 




82 


10 


63 


40 


69 


77 


112 


43 


62 


25 


4 


2 


2 






"\ 


"i 


30 


6 


l 


47— , 78- , T3 


1 




80 


9 


59 


35 


> 


70 


100 


48 


67 


35 


5 


5 


1 




"i 


1 


l 


35 


6 




48— '73-'74 


2 




37 


5 


53 


35 


80 


69 


100 


49 


70 


44 


4 


5 


1 




2 


2 


l 


3o 


4 




49— •74-7...... . 


1 




89 


6 


51 


33 


78 


67 


94 


50 


69 


41 


6 


6 






1 


1 


l 


31 


4 




50_ ::.-•;<; ... 


1 




27 


10 


54 


28 


76 


72 


92 


60 


75 


40 


9 


8 


"i 




1 


1 




33 


4 


4 


tU— T6-V7.... 


1 




21 


8 


I.-. 


30 


85 


00 


83 


61 


85 


67 


10 


6 


l 




2 


1 




33 


1 


5 


52_- r _ ;s 


2 




86 


s 


44 


32 


85 


66 


89 


55 


91 


52 


8 


6 


l 




2 


1 


" 


27 





3 


53—"? 


2 


1 


83 


7 


Hi 


28 


75 


56 


86 


55 


90 


49 


12 


10 






1 


1 




24 


3 


3 


64— '79->80 


1 


1 


85 


7 


55 


21 


87 


:o 


85 


60 


102 


52 


17 


11 






1 


1 


.. 


28 


4 


7 


55— *S0-'M 




1 


21 


8 


(8 


30 


95 


54 


70 


58 


107 


59 


23 


15 






2 


1 


.- 


29 




B 


50— "Sl->2 




1 


26 


8 


44 


27 


93 


57 


67 


70 


93 


50 


37 


23 


5 


3 


6 


2 




35 




13 


57— '82-83... _ 


1 


1 


33 


9 


45 


36 


ii a 


57 


62 


71 


89 


61 


55 


20 


3 


4 


6 


1 


"i 


36 


10 


L5 


B8— '8S-'84 


o 




4 1 


13 


51 


45 


130 


51 


62 


98 


102 


83 


102 


25 


g 


10 


7 


1 


a 


45 


13 25 


59— 84-"85 


2 




89 


13 


60 


51 


135 


64 


74 


87 


105 


91 


110 


24 


5 





12 


2 


1 


58 


15 28 




o 




13 


9 


54 


54 


126 


46 


78 


101 


97 


87 


110 


26 


6 


8 


13 


1 


1 


62 


12 32 


6i_'86-'87 


3 




38 


8 


00 


54 


123 


50 


79 


102 


105 


113 


120 


20 


11 


5 


3 


1 


1 


76 


1338 


02— '87-88.... 


3 


.... 


47 


11 


60 


48 


131 


72 


80 


92 


102 


90 


108 


29 


8 


4 


12 


1 


1 


76 


20^ 



sionary culture. When this Society was formed, Indiana and Illinois were in their infancy, Michi 
gan was, at that time and for ten years subsequent, a Territory: in 1825 it had but one Presbyterian 
ur Congregational minister, and lie was a missionary. Wisconsin remained, eight years after the 
organization of this Society, the almost undisputed home of the Indian. Iowa was not organized as 
a Territory till 1838. Oregon was reached by our first missionary there in the summer of 1848, after a 
voyage ol many months by way of the Sandwich Islands. Our first missionaries to California sailed 
from Xew York in December, 1S48. Our first missionary to Minnesota commenced his" labors at St. 
Paul, in July, 1849. 

5. It should be borne in mind that the number of missionaries in these newer States and Terri- 
tories, as well as those that have been ]oiii.'er cultivated, gives but an imperfect idea of the ground 
that has been occupied by missionary enterprise. Churches, every year, become independent, and 
others are taken up in their stead. 



108 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

GENERAL COMPARATIVE RESULTS. 



July, 



Society's 

Year, 

beginning 

1826. 



1— -26--27 
2— '27-'28 
3— "28- - 29 
4— '29-'30 
5— '30-'31 
6— Sl-'IiS 

7— 'aa-'sa 

8— '33-'34 
9— '34-35 
10— 'SS- 1 ^ 
11— '36-'37 
12— '37-'38 
13— '3 $-'39 
14— ^-MO 
15— '40-'41 
16— '41- '42 
17— '42-'43 
18— M3-'44 
19— , 44- , 45 
20— , 45- , 46 
21— "46-'47 
82— '47-'48 
23— MS-^ 
24— - 49-'50 
25— "SO-'Sl 
26— '51-'52 
27— '5'2-'5S 
28— "53-'54 
29— "54-'55 

30— 'ss-'se 

Sl—'m-W 

32— <57-'58 

33— 'oS-^ 

34— '59-'60 
35— '60-"61 
36— '61-62 
37— , 62-"63 
38— *63-'64 
39— "64- , G5 

40— 'es-^e 

41— '66-67 
42—67-68 
43— '68-'69 
44— "69-70 
45— 70-71 
46—71-72 
47—72-73 
48—73-74 
49—74-75 
50—75-76 
51—76-77 
52— '77-78 
53—78-79 
54— 79-'80 
55— •80-'81 
56— '81-"82 
57— '82-'83 
58— '83-"84 

59— •84- , 85 

60— '8b-'ffi 
61— '86-'87 
62— '87-'88 



Receipts. 



Expendi- 
tures. 



£ 




5 » 




"u 


O C3 


o .2 


o 

,0 
« 


a 
c 


19 


SB .2 

£ ft 


X 

3 


o g 


C s o! 

^ S 


O 
m 





— Pi 


C 'a 






c ^ 




> 


B 


155 


z a 





$18,140 76 
20,035 78 
26,997 81 
33,929 44 
48,124 73 
49,422 J 2 
68,627 17 
78,911 44 
88,863 22 

101.565 15 
85,701 59 
86,522 45 
82,564 63 
78,845 20 
85,413 34 
92,463 64 
99,812 84 

101,904 99 
121,946 28 
125,124 70 
116,717 94 
140,197 10 
145,925 91 
157,160 78 
150,940 25 
160,062 25 
171,734 24 
191,209 07 
180,136 69 
193,548 37 
178,060 68 
175,971 37 
188,139 29 
185,216 17 
183,761 80 
163,852 51 
164,884 29 
195,537 89 
186,897 50 
221,191 85 
212,567 63 
217,577 25 
244,390 96 
283,102 87 
246,567 26 

294.566 86 
267,691 42 
290,120 34 
308,896 82 
310,027 62 
293,712 62 
284,486 44 
273,691 53 
266,720 41 
290,953 72 
340,778 47 
370,981 56 
385,004 10 
451,767 66 
524,544 93 
482,979 60 
548,729 87 



$13,984 17 

17,849 22 

26,814 96 

42,429 50 

47,247 60 

52,808 39 

66,277 96 

80,015 76 

83,394 28 

92,188 94 

99,529 72 

85,056 26 

82,655 64 

78,533 89 

84,864 06 

&4.300 14 

98,215 11 

104,276 47 

118,360 12 

126,193 15 

119,170 40 

139,233 34 

143,771 67 

145.456 09 

123,817 90 

162,831 14 

174,439 24 

184,025 76 

177,717 34 

186,611 02 

180,550 44 

190,735 70 

187,034 41 

192,737 69 

183,762 70 

158,336 33 

133,843 39 

149,325 58 

189,965 39 

208,811 18 

227,963 97 

254.668 65 

274,932 55 

270,927 58 

263,617 19 

281,182 50 

278,830 24 

287,662 91 

296.789 65 
309,871 84 
310,604 11 
284,540 71 
260,330 29 
259,709 86 
284,414 22 
339,795 04 
354,105 80 
419,449 45 
460,722 83 

498.790 16 
507,988 79 
511,641 86 



169 
201 
304 
392 
463 
509 
606 
676 
719 



684 

665 

680' 

690 

791 

848 

907 

943 

971 

972 

1,006 

1,019 

1,032 

1,065 

1,065 

1,087 

1,047 

1,032 

S86 

974 

1,012 

1,054 

1,107 

1,062 

863 

734 

756 

802 

818 

846 

908 

972 

944 

940 

961 

951 

969 

952 

979 



946 
1,015 
1,0132 
1,070 
1,150 
1,342 
1,447 
1,469 
1,571 
1,584 



68 


1% 


110 


89 


244 


133 


169 


401 


186 


166 


500 


274 


164 


577 


294 


158 


745 


361 


209 


801 


417 


200 


899 


463 


204 


1,050 


490 


249 


1,000 


545 


232 


1,025 


554 


123 


840 


438 


201 


794 


473 


194 


842 


486 


178 


862 


501 


248 


987 


594 


225 


1,047 


657 


237 


1,245 


665 


209 


1,285 


736 


223 


1.453 


760 


189 


1,470 


713 


205 


1,447 


773 


192 


1,510 


808 


205 


1,575 


812 


211 


1,820 


853 


204 


1,948 


862 


213 


2,160 


878 


167 


2,140 


870 


180 


2,124 


815 


187 


1,965 


775 


201 


1,985 


780 


242 


2,034 


795 


250 


2,125 


810 


260 


2,175 


868 


212 


2,025 


835 


153 


1,668 


612 


155 


1,455 


562 


176 


1.518 


603 


199 


1,575 


635 


186 


1,594 


643 


208 


1,645 


655 


250 


1,710 


702 


246 


1,956 


734 


246 


1,836 


693 


227 


1,957 


716 


236 


2,011 


762 


217 


2,145 


714 


241 


2,195 


726 


214 


2,223 


701 


240 


2,274 


734 


234 


2^196 


727 


209 


2,237 


739 


199 


2,126 


710 


256 


2,308 


761 


255 


2.653 


783 


262 


2.508 


799 


301 


2.659 


817 


401 


2,930 


962 


380 


2,990 


1,017 


372 


3,005 


1,058 


392 


3,063 


1,117 


361 


3,084 


1,173 



not rep. 
1,000 
1,678 
1,959 
2,523 
6,126 
4.284 
2.736 
3,800 
3,750 
3,752 
3.370 
3,920 
4,750 
4,618 
5,514 
8,223 
7,693 
4,929 
5,311 
4,400 
5,020 
5,5.50 
6,682 
6,578 
6,820 
6,079 
6,055 
5,634 
5,602 
5.550 
6,784 
8,791 
6,287 
5,600 
4,207 
3,108 
3,902 
3.820 
3,924 
5,959 
6,214 
6,470 
6,404 
5,833 
6,358 
5,725 
5,421 
6,361 
7,836 
8,065 
7,578 
5,232 
5,598 
5,922 
6,032 
6.527 
7,907 
8,734 
9,050 
10,031 
10,012 



x 



not rep. 

306 

423 

572 

700! 

783 

1,148 

Pupils. 

52.000 

65,000 

80,000 

or.oon 

58,500 
60,000 
54,100 
64.300 
68,400 
60,300 
6Q.O0O 
76,700 
73,000 
77,000 
83,500 
75,000 
70,000 
66,500 
72,500 
65,400 

M.Mkl 

60,000 

62,500 

65,500 

67,300 

72,200 

70,000 

60,300 

54,000 

55,200 

58,600 

61,200 

64,000 

66,300 

75,300 

75,750 

71,500 

76,500 

74,000 

74,700 

80,750 

85.370 

80,300 

91,762 

87,573 

96,724 

99,898 

104,308 

106,638 

116,314 

118,000 

120,000 

129.350 

129,462 



1. The total receipts for the sixty-two years is $12,135,422.07. 

2. The total of years of labor is 42,149. 

3. The whole number of additions to the churches is 355,985. 

4. The average expenditure for a year of missionary labor includes the entire cost of the 
Society of obtaining the missionary, defraying his expense to his field, and sustaining him on it, 
as well as the average proportion of all the expenses in conducting the Institution. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 109 

AUXILIARIES AND MISSIONARY FIELDS. 

MAINE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Jonx O. Fiske, D.D., President; Rev. Jonathan E. Adams, Bangor, Secre- 
tary; John L. Crosby, Esq., Bangor, Treasurer. Office in Bangor. 

The Receipts of this Auxiliary within the year ending February 29th, were: 

From churches and individuals $6,727 54 

From Woman's Missionary Auxiliary 1,509 32 

From legacies 9,423 47 

[ncome from invested funds 3,972 45 

$21,632 7b 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Maine, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 2,984 99 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions £24,617 77 

The Auxiliary expended in its own held, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 29th 17,905 08 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, for 
the national work by request of donors, within the year ending March 
31st 710 63 

This Society has had in commission ninety-seven missionaries during 
the whole or a part of the year, of whom sixty-five are ordained and 
thirty-two are licentiates. One hundred and one churches have heen 
supplied for the whole or a part of the year, several out-stations have 
been supplied, and sixty-eight years of service performed. Five have 
been ordained. One house of worship has been dedicated; and one 
finished. One parsonage erected and several meeting-houses repaired. 

" The General Missionaries, " says the Secretary, '"have done good work. 
One church has been organized by the State Missionary and plans look 
to the forming of others in the near future. No year has been more 
fruitful in direct results than the past. The conversions and additions 
come from more churches, and are larger in numbers than is usual. Still 
there is great destitution in newer and smaller towns where society is left 
to settle down in carelessness and neglect, or is open to doubtful influ- 
ences and the propagation of error. We believe this should not be per- 
mitted and might be remedied could the evengelical denominations come 
to an understanding and look at the broad fields in the true light. By 
planning wisely, so as not to interfere with each other and so as to com- 
bine forces in the oncoming struggle with the powers of darkness and 
economize in the use of ministers and money, all this ground might be 
covered and no neighborhood would need be without the Gospel in its 
purity. The children of this world are in their generation wiser than the 
children of light. 

" We are glad to notice a growing interest in the work of the National 
Society. Many are opening their hearts and their purses, being ready to 
share the responsibility and cost in the effort to redeem our land." 



110 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

NEW HAMPSHIRE HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Samuel C. Bartlett, D.D., LL.D., President; Rev. Edward H. Greeley, 
D.D., Secretary; Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer. Office in Concord. 
The Receipts of this Auxiliary within the year ending February 29th were: 

From churches and individuals $4,480 00 

From legacies 2,328 91 

From N. H Cent Institution 1,500 00 

Income from invested funds 3,466 83 

$11,775 74 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in New 

Hampshire, for the national work, within the year ending March 31st. 17,601 87 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $29,377 61 

The Auxiliary expended in its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 29th 11,703 16 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 
for the national work, by request of donors, within the year ending 
March 31st 1,508 86 

This Society lias had in commission sixty-three missionaries the whole 
or a part of the year. Sixty-two churches and fifteen out-stations have 
been supplied and fifty years of service performed. Ten houses of wor- 
ship have been repaired and one chapel provided. 

"The year," says Dr. Greeley, '"' has been on the whole a prosperous 
one. The additions to the churches have been larger than usual. The 
settled purpose to sustain and perpetuate even the feebler churches seems 
to gain strength by the encounter with obstacles and disappointment. 
Never has a greater readiness to make personal sacrifices to this end been 
manifested. A strongly increasing interest in the cause of Home Mis- 
sions has been developed in the churches of the State at large. They evi- 
dently mean to be counted in, in what is increasingly felt to be the great 
missionary work of this age." 

VERMONT DOMESTIC MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Hon. Henry Fairbanks, Ph.D., President; Rev. Charles S. Smith, Secretary; 

J. C. Emery, Esq., Treasurer. Office in Montpelier. 

The Receipts of this Auxilary within the year ending February 29th, were : 

From churches and individuals $7,477 37 

From legacies , 79 56 

Income from invested funds 398 00 



$7,954 93 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Vermont, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 9,271 67 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $17,226 60 

The Auxilary expended in its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 29th $10,284 16 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 
for the national work, by request of donors, within the year ending 
March 31st 75 00 



1 sss . THE HOME MISS J OS A R V. Ill 

Fifty-five missionaries have been employed during the whole or a part 
of the year, performing forty-nine years of service in connection with 
sixty-three churches and nineteen out-stations. One church has assumed 
self-support, and eight houses of worship have been repaired. 

Says Secretary Smith, "The fruitage in the ingathering of souls has 
not been very abundant, but some churches have received enlargement. 

"Of the entire number of ourchurch.es in the State (198) about one 
fourth, forty-eight, are yoked. Six others hold permanent preaching 
every Sunday in two different houses of worship several miles apart, 
making sixty double fields ministered to by thirty pastors. Of these 
thirty pastors only sixteen receive missionary aid, and only eighteen of 
the sixty fields. As the result of this yoking, about $4,000 of missionary 
aid are saved. Of the thirty unyoked missionary churches the majority, 
from their location or other causes, cannot well be coupled. The aver- 
age grant to the aided churches is 1161.73. 

" As very few of our country towns are increasing in population and 
some are yet diminishing, our great struggle is to hold our own, to keep 
our churches alive for the salvation of theunevaugelized about them and 
that they may be in readiness to welcome, with the open sanctuary and 
heaven's message of mercy, those who may come to them when the tide 
of emigration shall be stayed and set back to re-people our hills and val- 
leys. 

" Eev. G. H. Merrill was chosen, in October, Field Secretary, and for 
the last six months has been visiting the churches, weak and strong, and 
rendering efneiant service. 

" We have groped our way the entire year in the valley of a shadow of 
debt, and the way has been anything but cheerful. We hope, however, 
with the blessing of God and the willing offerings of his people, to see 
the debt disappear before the close of our year." 

MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Julius H. Seelye, D.D., LL.D., President; Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary; 
Rev. E. B. Palmer, Treasurer. Office in Boston. 

The Receipts of this Auxiliary for Home Missions, within the year 

ending February 29th were $136,470 56 

The National Society received from churches and individuals in Massa- 
chusetts, for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 74,141 86 



Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $210,612 42 

The Auxiliary expended on its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 29th 44,500 09 

Investments according to condition of bequests 25,806 47 

Subscriptions for Home Missionary Magazine 107 49 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 
for the national work, within the year ending March 31st, viz. : 

From surplus 71,350 00 

By request of donors 14,921 53 

86,271 53 



112 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

One hundred and two missionaries have been in the service of this 
Society during the whole or a part of the year, performing over seventy- 
five years of labor. Ninety -seven churches and five missions have been 
supplied. In eight cases there were two men in the same field, within 
the year. Five churches have been organized, four houses of worship 
erected, and twelve repaired. 

"The work of the year." says Secretary Coit, "has not been in any/ 
way special or peculiar. Old churches have been sustained and encour-j 
aged, both by grants in aid and in many cases by visits from the General' 
Missionaries, Jones and Taft. New churches have been helped in their 
beginnings in the hope that they in years to come will help others in 
their turn. 

"More emphasis has been put upon endeavors in the direction of city 
evangelization. A large grant has been made to Berkeley Street Church, 
Boston, to become operative on settlement of their new pastor, who will 
be installed next month. The encouragement given first by this society 
has led to what is felt to be a very strong and hopeful movement. That 
church, happily located for a people's church, was told that if it would 
enter heartily upon evangelistic work and make itself by free pews and in 
every practicable way attractive to the people, this society would make a 
grant in aid. They accepted the proposition, and careful seareh found a 
man for pastor who was eager for just the sort of work proposed. He 
came with large plans and easily secured from others much more than 
our grant, so that now the new enterprise starts off with a strong finan- 
cial support and with the earnest wishes and warm prayers of many 
friends in other churches, and it maybe said in other denominations, for 
its highest and fullest success. 

"The work among the foreign population has developed in unexpected 
lines. The French Canadians in many places have welcomed our General 
Missionary. Our mission at Ware has been organized into a church, so 
that we have five French churches, and a new mission has been begun at 
Spencer under very favorable auspices. 

" Within a few years the strong churches have been led to a deeper inter- 
est in the welfare of their sister churches in the remote country towns in 
our own State, and at the same time, the greater though not more essential 
work in the West has grown in its hold upon them. This is plain from 
the fact that there has been no falling off in the gifts of the living this 
year, as might reasonably have been expected from the special effort 
made last year in view of the debt. It is plain from the though tfulness 
of many in regard to the problems which the immense immigration brings 
to the front — immigration from the North as well as from the remoter 
East. It is plain from the general approval of the new position of the 
National Society in paying promptly its missionaries at the front even at 
the risk of a debt. And yet it remains true that in spite of every effort 



188S. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 113 

that is made, there are very many of our church members who pass for 
intelligent men and women, and who we cannot doubt are earnest 
Christians and lovers of their country, that are densely ignorant of the need 
and opportunity of the Home Missionary Society. For much of this 
io-norance the pastors are beyond all doubt responsible. The grand 
awakening that is to come to our churches when men and women shall 
feel and know their duty as stewards so as to begin to do it, will come no 
doubt by inspiration from on high. The true minister will first catch the 
impulse and impart to his flock. 

"The winged words of Rev. Mr. Puddefoot, the inimitable, and the 
illustrated figures of Rev. Mr. Otis, the "star*' financier, have been cordially 
welcomed in Massachusetts, and are bearing and will bear fruit." 

RHODE ISLAND HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Hon. Rowland Hazard, President ; Rev. Alexander McGregor, Pawtucket, 
Secretary; Edwix Barrows, Esq., Treasurer. Office in Providence 

The Receipts of this Auxiliary within the year ending February 29th, wire : 

From churches and individuals $3,064 02 

Income from invested funds I 50 ()0 

$3,214 02 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Rhode 

Island, for the national work, within the year ending March 81st 4,547 06 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $7,761 08 

The Auxiliary expended in its own held, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 29th 3,496 27 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 
for the national work, by request of donors, within the year ending 
March 31st 940 96 

Eight missionaries have been in commission during the whole or a 
part of the year, in connection with eight churches. One church has 
been organized and five Sunday-schools report a membership of 828. 

Says Secretary McGregor: " All in all, the year under report has been 
one of encouragement and promise. There has been a marked deepening 
of interest among the stronger churches and their pastors in home mis- 
sion work in general, but especially in our own local work. Practical evi- 
dence of this is found in the appointment during the year of a State 
Evangelist or missionary at large, who has made proof of his ministry in 
strengthening the weaker churches and in seeking and findiug new and 
promising centers for aggressive Christian effort. 

" It has been the study of the board of directors during the year to 
bring a gentle pressure upon such fields as are in danger of becom- 
ing annuitants. After having done its best, the conviction is deepened 
that from various causes, which may be beyond control, there are some 
localities which are an inheritance of weakness." 



114 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT. 

Rev. William H. Moore, Secretary; Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer. Office 

in Hartford. 
The Receipts of this Auxiliary within year ending February 29th were : 

From churches and individuals $10, 103 20 

From legacies 379 35 

Income from invested funds 60 00 



$16,602 55 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Con- 
necticut, for the national work, within the year ending March 31st. . . 56,360 04 



Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $72,962 59 

The Auxiliary expended in its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 29th 15,988 89 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 
for the national work, within the year ending March 31st ; 

From surplus $184 23 

By request of donors 2,122 92 

$2,307 15 

Fifty men were commissioned, including five licentiates, one of whom 
within the year was ordained; also including one Dane, one German, and 
two Swedes. They accomplished forty-one years of labor. Two died. 
Forty churches were aided, including a church formed early in 1887 in 
one of the two missions. The West Stratford mission was a tentative 
effort. The success of the Colorado Street mission will he duly reported 
by the pastor. The work among the Danes, Germans and Swedes is 
promising. The General Missionary among our churches is rendering 
valuable service. The aided churches on the whole are doing well. The 
additional expense caused by the employment of General Missionaries 
and the effect of the National Society's indebtedness have kept us in 
anxiety through the year. We closed 1887 owing $1,150 more than we 
had means to pay. 



The total of receipts from New England are $360,599.27. which is 
more than the amount of the preceding year by $48,414.77. Of this, 
$103,877.65 were expended within its own bounds, and $256,721.62 were 
forwarded to the National Institution for its general work. 

NEW Y'ORK HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. William A. Robinson, D.D., President; Rev. Augustus G. Upton, Syracuse, 
Secretary; Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D.; New Y'ork, Treasurer; 

The receipts of the A. H. M. S. from New York have been $54,893.48, 
including $29,445.34 in legacies. Sixty-eight missionaries have been in 
commission in connection with eighty-six churches and stations. Seventy- 
one report a membership of 7,361. Two churches have been organized, 
two assumed self-support, and seven houses of worship have been repaired. 

Eev. Charles C. Creegan, D.D., Secretary of the Society for the past 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 115 

seven years, has been called by the American Board to be its District 
Secretary in New England. His removal is tbe cause of universal regret 
among the churches whose interests he has faithfully served with uni- 
versal acceptance. Rev. Augustus Gk Upton, late pastor of the church 
in Norwich, New York, and for some time a member of the Executive 
Committee of the Society, has been chosen bis successor. From Mr. 
Opton's first annual report tbe following exl racts are taken. "The year 
has been very quiet and uneventful in respect to the work done. The 
policy has been rather conservative, various causes Inning conspired to 
produce this. Almost nothing has been done in the way of si art ing new 
churches, the Clinton Avenue Church in Albany and the church in 
Watertown being the only new enterprises. The Clinton Avenue v. .. 
organized in April, 1887, but received its first recognition and grant from 
this Society in the following June. Its report of about 103 members 
that have raised among themselves in eight months $0,500 would seem 
to indicate that this latest of our new enterprises is likely to succeed like 
the early one. The successful work in Watertown 'has been presented 
in former reports, and it is only necessary to say that out of this ideal 
missionary enterprise, a church was organized last July, and formally 
recognized in October. 

" But we have more and important and blessed fruit yet to report. The 
real work of the church of Christ, the conversion and sanctification of 
men, has been faithfully prosecuted. The membership of our aided 
churches is something over 2,000, or about one twentieth of our entire 
membership in the State. These Home Missionary churches report about 
three hundred conversions during the year, or about one conversion to 
evcrv seven members. While these churches have gathered in 300 by 
conversion, they have gathered 200 by letter, and are teaching in their 
Sunday-schools 4,000 children. Who will say that we are giving too 
much aid to churches that increase in membership in one year twenty-five 
per cent, and teach 4,000 children the Word of God ? 

" A few of these churches of course are gradually dying. So is the 
Emperor Frederic, but every spark of vital force is cherished that he may 
live to give a new constitution to Prussia. So ought Ave to cherish ten- 
derly the failing life of these churches, for many of the very noblest men 
they will yet give to the world. 

-' And now, in the light of past experience what about the future? A 
letter from one of the officers of this Society says, ' The churches will 
welcome an aggressive policy. Brethren, there can be no other.' The 
New York Home Missionary Society is not organized for any post-hole 
policy. It is not chiefly, only incidentally, a bureau of pulpit supply or a 
mere clearing-house for the benevolent between strong and weak churches. 
It challenges all other societies in respect to the broadness and vital 
importance of its work. Is some one's heart greatly stirred for the con- 



110 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

version of foreign lands? Then enlist your efforts in our work for we can 
find those lands in every city in this State. Is it the great West you feel 
an interest in ? Xew York is truly the Empire State, for not only is she 
the gateway between the West and Europe, not only is three fourths of 
her treasury flushed over those western plains, but her own sons are con- 
stantly establishing themselves in all parts of the West. They are on the 
outmost frontier. Writes one of them to his mother, who asked what 
religious privileges he enjoyed : ' Mother, the people do not know when 
Sunday comes.' Dakota and Montana lie in the home missionary 
basket of your church. 

" Or is it the so-called despised races you are chiefly interested in reach- 
ing? We are not only from our weak missionary churches giving teachers 
to this work, but these despised races are within the bounds of our own 
State, and what is done for them here, this Society must do and is doing. 
We are helping the colored people to churches and the Chinese to schools. 

"We say, brethren, there is not a cause dear to the heart of philanthropy, 
or having to do with the salvation of any class of people, that this Society 
does not in some way come in contact with. There is no section of our 
country, not a mountain or valley, not a forest or mining region that this 
•Society does not reach. And therefore there is no cause that justifies such 
an enthusiasm of interest in all our churches as the cause of Home 
Missions. The rally for an aggressive campaign rings in our hearts 
and echoes throughout all the churches in our State." 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Rev. Thomas W. Jones, Philadelphia, Superintendent. 

The contributions from this district have been $2,128.81. Twenty 
missionaries have been in commission during the whole or part of the 
year in connection with twenty-three churches and seven out-stations. 
The Puritan Church of' Wilkesbarre reached self-support. Seventeen 
Sunday-schools report a membership of 508. 

This district, in connection with Western Pennsylvania, West Virginia, 
Virginia, Maryland, District of Columbia, and New Jersey, has been 
formed into a single department and Rev. Thomas W. Jones, late of 
Saratoga Springs, has been appointed Superintendent, v'-'Sa residence at 
Philadelphia. 

OHIO HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Henry M. Tenney, President; Rev. John G. Fraser, Cleveland, Secretary: 
Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., New York, Treasurer. 

The field of this Society included within the past year such portions 
of Western Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Kentucky, as were within 
the limits of the General Conference of Ohio. The Treasurer reports that 
the amount raised for Home Missions, including the " Bohemian Mis- 
sion work" in Cleveland, in this field, during the year ending March 31, 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 117 

is 110,274.89. (Individuals and churches, $9,958.20; Legacies, $316.69 ). 
The expenditures have been (including the " Bohemian Mission work ") 
110,602.12. [Note.— In the Treasurer's Report of the A. II. M. S., 
$635.36 of the above stated receipts, and 8534. 11 of the expenditures, are 
not included — the report containing the same not reaching the Treas- 
urer before the accounts of the fiscal year were closed.] 

Thirty-nine missionaries have been in commission during the whole 
or a part of the year in connection with fifty-six churches and out-sta- 
tions. Six evangelists and seven Bible-readers have been employed in 
Cleveland by the Bohemian Mission Board. 

Secretary Fraser in his annual report says: 

" Ten churches at least have been organized or re-organized upon the 
field; Cleveland. Bethlehem, a Bohemian church; Eagleville and Ireland, 
country churches; Ironton, Welsh, which abandons its alliance with 
another denomination, returns to the Congregational list, asks aid from 
the Society, and proposes to become an English church; Sherrodsville, 
a Welsh church, with Welsh services, in a promising field; Lima, Spring- 
field, Toledo, (Lagrange St.), three fields of rare promise, and Kane and 
Sharpsburg, Pa., hopeful fields, but with the other Pennsylvania churches, 
passing from under the care of the Ohio Society by the appointment of 
Rev. Thomas W. Jones, as Superintendent of a new District, including 
all the Pennsylvania churches. Seven of these ten churches have, or 
ask for, home missionary aid, six from the Ohio Societ}\ Eight are 
organized with the counsels and aid of the Society or its missionaries, one 
of which, Kane, Pa., with great vigor assumes self-support from the 
beginning and has already begun work upon a house of worship. " 

Bohemiax Work. — The particulars of the Bohemian work in Cleve- 
land are given in full in connection with Mr. Schauffler's report as Super- 
intendent of the Slavonic Department and need not be here repeated. 

Continuing his report, Mr. Fraser says: 

" Evangelists. — The special evangelistic work of the Society may 
now after over two years be fairly said to have passed beyond the stage 
of cpiestion or experiment. Mr. Quaife has held revival meetings with 
fifteen churches and has spent from one to four days with eleven others. 
There are thought to have been 288 conversions, 186 have been added 
to the churches, six prayer-meetings have been brought again from the 
dead. Other items of the work are 221 sermons, 186 other addresses, 63 
children's meetings, 117 after-meetings, 72 worker's meetings. Mr. 
Quaife's summer was spent in Springfield, and resulted in the organiza- 
tion of the Loganda Ave. Church, with no English evangelical church 
within a mile. The work carefully and wisely begun has prospered 
greatly and the church has already doubled its membership. 

" Country. — Without special planning, but simply in taking its nat- 
ural course, the work of the Society has about equally divided itself 
between country and city, new work and old, feeble and failing churches 



118 THE HOME MI88I0NARF. July, 

and churches with promise of rapid growth and early self-support. Mak- 
ing the line between city and country at villages with population of 
1,000, rather more churches have been aided in country than in city, 
while the number of men commissioned has been more equally divided. 
The country churches not only have sent, but are still sending, their best 
material to the cities and to the West, and from them comes very largely 
the supply of ministers. The feeling is deepening that these churches 
must be sustained. 

" City. — AVork has opened to the Society in the large towns and cities, 
as perhaps never before in any one year. Four churches have been 
organized in Ohio cities, as already noted, and the church in Findlay has 
taken on new life and vigor, and is proving itself equal to its unique 
opportunity under the lead of its earnest pastor. Of the nine churches 
named as organized within the territory of the Society during the year, 
seven are in places of over fifteen thousand population, and four in cities 
of over ten thousand. And ' there remaineth yet very much land to be 
possessed. ' 

"Welsh Chukches. — There are in Ohio about forty Welsh Con- 
gregational churches. One at least has been organized with considerable 
strength during the year. It has been the privilege of the Secretary 
to visit a number of these churches and address their Conferences, 
and to have correspondence and personal interviews with their pastors. 
A few of these churches are strong and growing, but more are waning, 
because of the exhaustion of coal banks and the closing of iron works, 
but most of all, because the children, trained in the English, are leaving 
the church of their parents, in not, a few cases, with the consent and 
even the advice of the pareuts. Now and then a church is found, as 
in the large cities, or in the midst of the Welsh colonies, of which there 
are several in the State, where there is still call for only Welsh services. 
Eecognizing this fact, and on the request of one of the Welsh Confer- 
ences, the Executive Committee has modified its rules, which required 
half the services in an aided church to be in English, and now, while 
seeking and urging the introduction of English, j^et treats each case on 
its own merits. The Welsh people are fervent in their piety, hearty in 
their praise, stalwart in their orthodoxy, and constitutional Congrega- 
tionalists, but our interest in the problem appears in the startling and 
almost incredible fact that, at this present time, twenty-four of the 
purely English-speaking Congregational churches of Ohio, just about 
one eighth of the entire number, are ministered to by Welsh ministers. 
To keep up the supply of pastors for the English churches, the Welsh 
churches must be cared for, and encouraged and aided to provide for 
their own children. 

" The Futtre. — The country churches are likely to need aid in 
rather increasing number; the city work was never so urgent nor so prom- 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 119 

ising of speedy results as now; the Bohemian "work is fast ripening, 
but with in) less need of aid at present; the problem of the Welsh 
chnrches seems to go steadily on towards solution; with all, the wide 
fields beyond never called more loudly for harvesting. All these things 
eall for larger plans, more work, increased offerings, a deepening sense of 
responsibility and privilege. Have we eome to the kingdom for such a 
time as this? " 

ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY. 

Rev. Edward P. Goodwin, D.D., President; Rev. Jambs Tompkins. Secretary; 
Aaron 15. Mead, Esq., Treasurer, Office in Chicago. 

The Receipts of Lhis Auxiliary for Home Missions, within the year 

en. 1 in- March 31st, were $17,111 1G 

The National Society received from churches and individuals in Illi- 
nois for the national work, Avithin the year ending March 31st 4,676 75 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $21,787 91 

The Auxiliary expended on its own field for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending March 31st 16,810 36 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 
for the oational work, by request of donors, within the year ending 
March 31 si 225 00 

Says Secretary Tompkins in his report: " Fifty missionaries aside from 
State evangelists have been engaged in labor during the whole or some 
portion of the year. Forty-five of them were regularly commissioned, 
and five of them have been employed in special services without commis- 
sion. These have ministered regularly to fifty-eight churches and 
twenty-nine destitute communities where we have no church organiza- 
tions: making eighty-seven communities which have been served by our 
missionary pastors. 

" Seven State evangelists or general missionaries have been under com- 
mission during the whole or a portion of the year. These served sixty- 
four months including the period of their vacation. They visited ninety- 
eight d liferent places in most of them holding a series of meetings vary- 
ing in length from a few days to six weeks. Twenty of the places visited 
were destitute of a church organization at the time of the visit. Of the 
seventy-eight churches in which they labored thirty-two were pastorless. 
Nine churches have been organized in the destitute communities iu 
which they have labored. Six other churches have been organized in the 
State during the year. Three of the new churches are among our immi- 
grant population, namely, one German, one Scandinavian and one Bohe- 
mian. 

" With the close of the present year we round out the first decade of 
this Society as an independent auxiliary. Thankfully we record the fact 
that it has been the best year in its history. 

" The largest amount ever raised in the State for the cause of Home Mis- 



120 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

sions has been secured this year, and the largest amount which has been 
devoted to the national work outside the State has been sent to the treas- 
ury this year. But better than these is the fact that more earnest work 
has been performed and higher spiritual results achieved than in any 
previous year." 

WISCONSIN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D., President; Rev. Thomas G. Grassie, Milwau- 
kee, Secretary; R. A. McCullough, Esq., Milwaukee, Treasurer. 
The Receipts of this Auxiliary for Home Missions, within the year 
ending February 29th Avere : 

From churches and individuals $10,400 16 

From legacies 230 00 

From invested funds 308 20 

$10,958 36 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in "Wis- 
consin, for the national work, within the year ending March 31st. . . 959 12 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $11,917 48 

The Auxiliary expended on its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 29th.... 11,249 95 

Secretary Grassie, in his report, says, "The number of churches aided 
during the year, including North Wisconsin, has been eighty. The num- 
ber of missionaries employed, seventy-one. The latter have performed 
an aggregate of fifty-three years labor in these churches, and in forty- 
three out-stations. This is an increase from last year of nine churches 
aided and seventeen missionaries employed. Seven new churches have 
been formed, namely: Ashland; Baldwin; Dousman; Eagle Eiver; 
Lynxville; Tomahawk, and West Suj:>erior. Four of these have already 
built and are occupying good houses of worship, and the others have the 
work of building in hand. 

Throughout the State, from Lake Superior to the Illinois line, there 
are multitudes of communities where the religious destitution demands 
the planting of churches, and only the lack of funds and of ministers to 
sustain prevents our entering them. 

" A very important part of the work in our State is the resuscitation of 
lapsed churches. When the State assumed self-support more than sixty, 
over a half, of its home missionary churches were pastorless, some of them 
far gone: had been without preaching for years; congregations had long 
been disbanded; Sunday-schools were gone; records lost; meeting-houses 
dilapidated. It is not necessary to look for the cause of this melancholy 
condition further than to mention lack of home missionary funds to 
sustain the work. We are taking hold of these churches one by one as 
our treasury will permit, and bringing the dead to life. 

" The Society has continued the employment of evangelistic services 
among our churches. The Rev. George W. Nelson has been engaged 
therein the most of the year, and has rendered invaluable service in revi- 



1888. Til H HOME MISSIONARY. 121 

vals. We are more and more satisfied that rightly used this is a most 
valuable agency in home missionary administration. 

" Our work among the Scandinavians is growing. The policy of receiv- 
ing Swedish free churches into organic union with our denomination as a 
condition of their receiving our aid has been carried out with the result 
of establishing a good understanding between those churches and our 
own. They respect our position and approve the reasonableness of it. 
In no case lias a church declined our condition, but five of them have 
voted after full discussion to apply for admission to our Convention, and 
have been received. These churches are intelligent and earnestly evan- 
gelical, and seem exceedingly gratified at having come into the full fel- 
lowship of our denomination. During the year now reported we have 
had six Scandinavian missionaries and we are extending operations 
among this most admirable and interesting people. No class of foreigners 
is more welcome to Wisconsin. 

NORTH WISCONSIN. 
Rev. George A. Hood, Ashland, Superintendent. 

The eight congregations and eight missionaries of last year have 
grown to twenty-five congregations, served by eighteen missionaries, 
including five students and two temporary men. Churches have been 
orgauized at West Superior, Eagle River, Ashland ami Tomahawk. Two 
pastors have been ordained and recognized. Washburn, by mill failure 
for $500,000, was so depressed as to call for aid at the last of the year. 
Says Superintendent Hood : " In the development of the material re- 
sources, the anticipations of last year are being realized, and the immense 
wealth of nature is being turned into money as fast as practicable. Towns 
have grown, railways have been built ; the blast furnaces, charcoal kilns, 
elevators and docks, have begun operations as expected, and new projects 
are opening. New mines are opened, and the shipments of '87 w r ere 
nearly double those of '86, though the freights took most of the profit. 
The two famous seaboard railway lines have finished " racing for the Soo;" 
the Minneapolis road reaches out for the riches of the West, connects 
with the Canadian Pacific, and unloads its cars into the ocean steamers. 
The Duluth road will do the same with the stock and grain of the North- 
ern Pacific country. Three east and west lines bind North Wisconsin 
and North Michigan together, and suggest one large, rich, mining and 
lumber State, with rich soil opening to a mighty population. Six north 
and south railways run from Lake Superior to Chicago; five others are 
now coming, making fourteen main lines in all. 

In towns where we have churches, oue of 7,000 population, January 
1887, grew to 14,000 by January. 1888. Another of 1,000 to 3,500 within 
the same time. Both with brick blocks, hotels, and street cars. Another 
of 1.200 to 3,500 ; one of 800 to 1,800. One town, where the first train 
arrived in September, grew to 700 before winter, and several new smaller 



122 • THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

towns have begun sawing the -pine, so the prophecies of the last report 
have been fulfilled and the prophets are still prophesying. 

In spiritual work we have not been able to find the men to secure the 
expected results, and where wo have had a minister he has been hindered 
by lack of a home. It is harder to secure results in this lumber and 
mining region than in a fanning population. Everybody is here for 
wealth and not for health, spiritual or physical. Church prosperity must 
be forced. The successful minister must have a heart full of enthusiasm, 
good sense and business energy, ahead full of good ortbodox sermons, a 
good delivery, a face full of smiles, pleasant words for every one on his 
lips, acts always cordial and brotherly to all, the whole operated by the 
power of the Holy Ghost. For lack of such, towns have been entirely 
destitute of Sabbath services, and other denominations have entered and 
divided our work. This is one great necessity — the other is churches and 
parsonages ; for these we this year must earnestly work and pray. 

IOWA HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 
Rev. Truman O. Douglass, Grimiell, Secretary; J. H. Merrill, Esq., Des Moines, 

Treasurer. 
The Receipts of this Auxiliary for Home Missions, within the year end- 
ing February 29th, were: 

From churches and individuals $11,584 66 

From Legacies 300 00 

$11,884 66 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Iowa, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 1,085 54 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $12,970 20 

The Auxiliary expended on its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 29th 12,265 99 

This Society had in its employ, during the whole or a part of the 
year, seventy-six missionaries, the aggregate of whose time of service was 
fifty-one years and eleven months. Two of these missionaries were evan- 
gelists, three of them were pastors at large engaged to supply pastorless 
churches and do general and evangelistic work. The number of churches 
which had the services of these missionaries was 100. Seventy-six of 
them have missionary pastors, twelve of them were supplied regularly by 
the pastors at large, and twelve of them were self-supporting churches 
which were greatly blessed by the labors of our Home Missionary evan- 
gelists. Five of the churches were organized within the year, viz: Alli- 
son, Elma, Green Island, Sioux City, Mayflower, and Talmage ; and a 
number of out-stations will soon be organized into churches. Secretary 
Douglass, in continuing his report, says : " It was a hard year financially. 
We had a dry season and poor crops ; a heavy emigration of our moneyed 
men to California and elsewhere, and an unusual number of churches had 
local enterprises on hand. Nevertheless we raised and expended for the 
State work more than a thousand dollars above any former year. New 



1888. 7V//; HOME MISSIONARY. 123 

fountains of benevolence were discovered ;uid opened. Our churches are 
slowly but. surely Learning to 'abound in this grace altJOu' 

" During tbe year it has .seemed unusually difficult to secure ministers 
for our home missionary fields, but, still our missionary forces have been 
eaJwgttd. More fields have been occupied and more work done than in 
any previous year since the Society was organized. If bus not been a 
yesuj of church planting .although a few churches have been organized, 
and now missions started which will soon double up into churches. It 
h;is been rather a year of gpowth for the churches, especially for the 
younger churches already established. 

(i Iowa is a good State. We accept the title given us, ' the Massachu- 
setts of the West.' Prohibition does prohibit. We are not cursed with 
large cities, nevertheless we see confronting us all the perils that threaten 
the nation. Tbe boom and rush of immigration are not here but in the 
region beyond. Tbe State, however, is gradually filling up, and, for the 
most part, with a people who have come to stay, and who welcome the 
institutions of the Gospel. With money and missionaries enough we 
might soon double our work." 

MARYLAND, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, AND 

GEORGIA. 

Thirteen missionaries and one teacher have been under commission 
during the whole or a part of the year, viz.: 

Maryland. — Rev. William C. Jones, at Frostburg, with Ocean Mines 
and Alleghany as out-stations, was in service nine months of the year. 
He reported GO church members and 158 in the Sunday-school. 

A new field was opened at Baltimore and designated as the "Pilgrim 
Mission.'' The services of the Pev. P. J. Thomas have been secured and 
the indications of success are most encouraging. 

District of Columbia.— The Tabernacle Church at "Washington 
assumed self-support October 1, 1887. The pastor, Pev. William C. 
Scofield, reported 53 church members and 200 scholars in* the Sunday- 
school. 

Pev. Charles H. Small, at Mt. Pleasant, continued his labors during 
the year and reports 39 church members, including 10 additions, and 
115 in the Sunday-school. 

Virginia. — Pev. Frederick W. Tuckerman, at Falls Church, with 
Merrifield as an out-station, reports 67 church members, including 11 
additions, and two Sunday-schools with a membership of 90. 

Pev. Jason K. Mason. D.D., at Herndon. reports 81 church members, 
including 14 additions, and 120 scholars in the Sun day-school. Pev. J. 
O. Wilson was engaged for four months, one of tbe last year, in mission- 
ary service at Natural Bridge. 

Tennessee.— Pev. Edmund L. Hood closed his labors early in the 
year with the Pilgrim Congregational Church at Knoxville, and was sue- 



124 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

ceeded by Rev. John H. Frazee, who reports a church membership of 42, 
including 20 additions, and 140 in the Sunday-school — a gain of 70 within 
the year. 

Rev. Lewis Morgan, in service with the Welsh Church at Soddy, 
reports 79 church members, including 17 additions, and 170 in the 
Sunday-school — a gain of 40. 

Georgia. — Rev. Zachary Eddy, D.D., closed his labors with the 
Church of the Redeemer at Atlanta, and was followed by Rev. George 
R. Turk, who reports a church membership of 123, including 18 addi- 
tions, and 87 in the Sunday-school. 

Rev. William Shaw, in service with the Berean Church at Atlanta, 
reports 142 church members and 250 scholars in the Sunday-school. Dr. 
A. C. Denham, as missionary teacher at the Berean Mission, reported 80 
scholars attending the school. 

FLORIDA. 
Rev. Sullivan F. Gale, Jacksonville, Superintendent. 

The contributions from this State to the Treasury have been $539.12. 
Says Superintendent Gale, "The year covered by this report has been a 
year of hard times. The effects of Florida's reverses which set in in 1886 
have been deeply felt in the summer and autumn of 1887. And in May 
of the latter year, yellow fever became epidemic at Key West and con- 
tinued till late into the summer. During the autumn it prevailed in 
Tampa. Although the disease was of a mild type, quarantine was 
unavoidably established. The system of quarantine in vogue, while it 
proved efficient, had the most vicious and paralyzing effect upon society 
and business. 

"But near the end of the year grand revival of business investments, 
immigration and confidence in the rapid and permanent development of 
the State set in. The prospects for the future, according to the best 
judges, is good, and enlargement of the Society's work immediately is 
imperative. 

"The first death in the home missionary annals of Florida was that of 
Rev. John McKean, in August last, at Interlachen, after a brief illness. 
He died in the midst of successful and well appreciated ministerial 
labors, highly esteemed by all his brethren of the "Florida Band," 
greatly beloved by the people whom he served, and in the most happy 
assurance of the Divine favor. 

" Special mention is due to the devoted ministrations and heroic Chris- 
tian and pastoral fidelity of Rev. Sidney Crawford, of Tampa, during the 
epidemic in the city. 

"Rev. Zachary Eddy, D.D., served the church at Lake Helen at his own 
charges several months at the end of the year, which was generous in him 
both toward the church and the Missionary Society and was most cordi- 
ally appreciated by all. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 125 

"Rev. Eussell T. Hall, being called to the church in Jacksonville, was 
installed by council, and Frances P. Bacheler was ordained and installed 
pastor of the Phillips Church. 

" Evangelistic services have been held at Interlachen, Longwood, West 
Longwood, Port Orange and New ►Smyrna with happy results. The 
churches in these places have been much strengthened. Rev. Joseph 
Oadwallader has been of especial helpfulness in these services. Many 
conversions have attended his labors. Rev. M. L. Eastman, of Wisconsin, 
while visiting in this State, labored effectively in revival work at New 
Smyrna. Mr. F. E. Nettleton, of Lake Helen, at the meeting of the 
Stale Association made to the churches an offer to assume the necessary 
support, above what the field will afford, of an evangelist for six or nine 
months of labor. The offer was accepted and referred to the Executive 
Committee of the Florida Home Missionary Society. It has been a mat- 
ter of great gratification to the churches to learn that the Congregatioual 
Sunday-School and Publishing Society has appointed Rev. William Shaw, 
of Atlanta, Georgia, General Missionary for this State and Georgia. 

"The subject of comity is still receiving some attention. The need of 
it is quite exceptional. Several ecclesiastical bodies have answered the 
proposals of the State Association negatively, and not much encourage- 
ment is found for the hope that comity may be generally observed by the 
denominations at work on this field. 

"Rollins College, at Winter Park, truly an ' unfolding of home mis- 
sionary history/ has enjoyed continued prosperity, but is hardly pressed 
for means necessary to enter fully upon its grand opportunity. The 
religious spirit of the institution is eminently satisfactory, as are its 
scholastic work and enrollment. 

MISSOURI, ARKANSAS, AND INDIAN TERRITORY. 
Rev. Franklin B. Doe, St. Louis, Superintendent. 

The receipts from this missionary district have been $9,141.67, includ- 
ing a legacy of $2,500. In Missouri forty-seven have borne the Society's 
commission during the year; in Indian Territory, nineteen; in Arkansas, 
thirteen — the last two include teachers. Total number in this district, 
seventy-nine. Fifteen ministers have come to the State of Missouri dur- 
ing the year, and nine have left it. Six churches have been organized, 
namely: Hyde, Hitt, Ritchey, Mine La Motte, Alba and Tabernacle Church 
in St. Louis. The first three are in the country and are small. It doth 
not yet appear what they may become. They yoke with other churches. 
It is not wise to neglect the country entirely, lest it heathenize and 
become tributary to the forces of evil. 

We cannot say with certainty that any church has reached self-sup- 
port. It is expected that at least four will do so before the close of this 
fiscal year, namely: Olivet in Kansas City, Church of the Redeemer in 



126 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

St. Louis, Bonne Terre, and Cameron. Seven church edifices have heen 
added to our list, six of which are missionary. A large number of sanct- 
uaries have been enlarged or repaired or improved in some way, and 
several parsonages secured. Some debts have been canceled. 

Contributions from all sources through the New York Treasury reach 
about $5,000. This is $1,000 in excess of any previous year. The State 
committee consisting of eleven members, ten of whom were present, spent 
one day together, considering the whole field, discussing methods and 
recommending grants. The estimated collections of the State for the 
year are $6,500 — one thousand dollars more than the past year, or an 
average of over one dollar per member. There are not less than twenty 
towns of importance in Missouri where we have no church, which we 
might wisely enter if we had the means. Kansas City will start another 
soon, Sedalia, Springfield, and St. Louis ere long. We have reached the 
period of easy and wise enlargement. Conditions have changed. Prog- 
ress is the law and present watchword. Hence .the City Missionary 
Societies in St. Louis and Kansas City, and the Congregational Club. 
These indicate a new order of things and an advance all along the line. 
Plans and methods of ten years ago will not do for Missouri to-day. We 
are in the period of enlargement and consolidation and higher style of 
work and not of feebleness, experiment, and uncertainty. The next ten 
years will show great progress in Missouri; we must adajot ourselves to the 
coming opportunities and needs. 

Arkansas — has made but little gain. Eureka is still vacant, Dr. 
Read having accepted a call to Little Rock. Siloam Academy has been 
troublesome. It is an open question as to the wisdom of investing more 
money in that local school. The Rogers Academy has been improved at 
considerable outlay. The school becomes more thoroughly established 
each year; it is doubtless permanent, and is a power for good. There is 
quite an immigration into Arkansas because of climate and timber, and we 
have better prospects ahead. But the advance must needs be compara- 
tively slow. 

Indian Territory. — In Indian Territory but little progress has been 
made outside of Worcester Academy. One church has been organized 
(colored) at Hopkins with fifteen members. Wilberforce Institute must 
be run on higher grade. We need a Principal educated in our schools to 
take charge of the church also, whose wife can teach music. Worcester 
Academy has had a year of marked success. The old fights seem to be 
ended, the teachers all give satisfaction. We have our one strong hold 
in the Territory at Vinita. The Academy has made an honorable record, 
done much good, and cannot easily be killed. 

TEXAS AND LOUISIANA. 
Rev. Cyrus I. Scofield, Dallas, General Missionary. 
The contributions from this district have been $707.90. Eight mis- 



isss. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 127 

sionaries have been employed during the whole or part of the year in 
connection with eight churehes and stations. One church has been 
organized, and nine Sunday-schools report a membership of 685. 

Mr. Scofield, in submitting his annual report, says, "The ten impor- 
tant fields open to our work a year ago havy become more than twenty, 
and the reasonable prospect is that the tide of immigration now pouring 
into Texas and Louisiana will this year make these twenty opportunities 
forty. Since my last report, in which I called attention to the prospect- 
ive opening of the great Panhandle — larger than Indiana and as fertile 
as Central Kansas — two trunk lines of railroad have been built across it, 
and nothing but the preoccupation of the country by large ranches 
restrains a great rush into a region so favored with advantage of soil, 
climate, and means of access. This hindrance will soon be removed by 
the combined action of land-owners and the State authorities, and then 
will come an opportunity which will neither wait nor be repeated. 

"The immigration to fertile Southwest Louisiana under the double 
attraction of its balmy climate and cheap lands continues to be large and 
of excellent quality. The buildings for Lake Charles College to be 
wholly paid for by the locality and presented complete to a Board of 
Trustees composed of Texas and Louisiana Congregationalists, are under 
contract and will be ready for opening in September. The importance 
of this enterprise can not be overestimated. Lake Charles is also grow- 
ing in favor as a winter resort, and my coi'respondence warrants the ex- 
pectation that no small part of the patronage of the college will come 
from those seeking the advantages of an open winter climate and a first- 
class school for their children. 

" When these isolated facts are grouped with others showing the vast- 
ness of this region it will be seen that our denominational effort and 
expenditure is startlingly beneath our denominational opportunity and 
duty. Texas is to-day the Japan of Home Missions. If it is neglected 
now, the unavailing regrets over lost opportunities in Ohio, Indiana, and 
Illinois will in time be multiplied by as much as Texas is greater than 
they. 

"The labors of evangelist Harold S. Sayles during the past season 
have resulted in marked quickening of the spiritual life of the churches 
and new substantial gains in membership. The movement of the 
Congregational Methodists and Free Methodists towards a closer union 
with us is assuming definite form, and will, perhaps, be an accomplished 
fact before midsummer. This, while most desirable from every jioint 
of view, will materially increase both our opportunities and expenditures." 

NEW MEXICO AND ARIZONA. 
Rev. James M. Ashley, Albuquerque, New Mexico, General Missionary. 

Sixteen missionaries have been in commission during the whole or 
a part of the year in connection with twenty churches and out-stations. 



128 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

One church lias been organized, and forty-five hopeful conversions have 
been reported. Twelve Sunday-schools report a membership of 767. 

INDIANA. 
Rev. Edward D. Curtis, Indianapolis, Superintendent. 

The contributions from this State have been : From congregations and 
individuals, 8959.50; from legacies, $1,000; in all, $1,959.50 — an advance 
over the previous year of $1,606.94. Ten missionaries have been in com- 
mission, ministering to twenty churches and fifteen out-stations. Two 
missionaries have recently begun to supply four new fields; seven other 
fields have been visited and have enjoyed occasional preaching. Four 
churches have been organized, namely: Eames, Hammond, Portlaud, 
and Coal Bluff. One field has been reorganized, Andrews; and one 
independent church, Ross, has voted itself Congregational, making an 
increase of six in all. One church has disbanded, and another long since 
extinct should be dropped from our rolls; making our present number 
thirty-seven, some of which are extremely weak. Eight only are self- 
supporting. Four fields, by employing students, get along without aid. 
Brazil and Huntington, two county seats, and Perth, a coal-mine village, 
are supplied regularly, and will soon organize. Several of the fields have 
experienced a gracious visitation of the Holy Spirit, and the seed sown 
has brought a bountiful harvest. The church at Hammond was born in 
a religious awakening. The superintendent called upon an aged lady 
in a part of the city remote from churches, who greeted him with the 
welcome, "I am glad to see one of God's children," there was a 
prayer-meeting, then and there, that claimed the promise of two. Her 
little home was open for service; backsliders were reclaimed; strong men 
wept. Prayer was earnest and fervent. Peculiarly situated as the 
suburb of Chicago, the place has run riot in wantonness and excess. The 
aged saint said: " I have prayed these many long years, and I believe God is 
going to bless this place here."' When the council convened to recognize 
the little band as a church she was not able to leave her home, but she 
sent the word: " Tell them I cannot meet with them, but that I am 
praying for the new church all the day." The membership has doubled 
in six months. 

Superintendent Curtis, continuing his report, says: " The coming 
decade will doubtless witness a large development of Congregational 
growth in Indiana. The outlook is cheering. The State may have 
been slow but will be sure. Heretofore the churches have been most 
faithful to Congregational principles, and stable in the midst of opposing 
elements. A new era of aggressive work is now opening. ' There is the 
sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees. ' A noble enthusiasm 
to lay deep and strong foundations in this great central State has seized 
the working elements in our churches, and news of vigorous and success- 



isss. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 129 

ful work is heard all along the advanced line. Various causes are hast- 
ening with galloping pace to force the State to the front. Her capital 
city, Indianapolis, has become the greatest railway center of the nation. 
An immediate consequence of the multiplication of lines of transporta- 
tion, and the increasing home market through the growth of cities, and 
conveyance to the great centers of Chicago, St. Louis, and Cincinnati, is 
the rapid rise of the agricultural wealth of the State, and the introduction 
of extensive lines of tile drainage. This renders the soil, (which is natur- 
ally rich), warm, dry and arable, and effectually removes the malaria. It 
is thus becoming a healthy State. 

"Extensive fields of bituminous and other coal, in various strata, 
underlie Southern Indiana. A great aggregation of population is going 
on in the coal-mining district. Many of the people are new comers from 
foreign shores. The children are numerous, and the condition of the 
social and family life is most pitiful. Sometimes not a building in a 
mining village can properly be called a house. The saloons are numerous 
and deadly. In Carbon eleven stand in a row without a break. Society 
needs a Christian culture and gets a saloon culture. I found villages of 
800 souls without church or a Sunday-school, or a minister of the Gos- 
pel. Until our missionary went in, there Avas not a minister resident on 
the wdiole stretch of the Indiana and St. Louis railroad for twenty-five 
miles through mining towns. 

" Ten counties of the central east section of Indiana form a part of 
the largest natural gas area in the world. This is a very fertile and popu- 
lous region, with railways crossing in every direction. It is about equally 
distant from Cincinnati, Louisville, St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit, Cleve- 
land and Columbus. A genuine boom has seized upon the main centers 
of gas supply, and the population is rapidly doubling and even trebling. 

"The crucial decade of Congregational opportunity in Indiana has 
come. The unfolding years have laid bare the defects of sectarian lines 
of home evangelization. The ministers of the larger metropolitan cities 
have felt the impress of Congregational life from abroad; lowering sec- 
tarian walls, liberalizing non-essential dogmas, and making possible union 
and co-operative effort. The problem of religous life and multiplication 
can best be solved by the introduction of the Congregational common 
denominator. 

"There are 000,000 men in the State between the ages of sixteen and 
forty, 500,000 of whom are outside the membership of evangelical 
churches. With no desire whatever to cause the present Congregational 
grasp in Indiana to exceed the opportunity, I give it as my deliberate 
judgment, that it becomes our immediate and bounden duty to stake out 
great appropriations for God here. The church that enters this field now 
can now lay foundations upon which the newer, larger life which is com- 
ing in great influx into these communities can build. God is in it, 
for if we are entrusted by him with principles and life, no other can do 



130 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 



our work ; and if we do it not, it will be left undone. Not so did the 
Pilgrim and Puritan founders prove recreant to their trusts." 

MICHIGAN. 

Rev. Leroy Warren, Lansing, Superintendent. 

The receipts from Michigan, within the Society's fiscal year have been 
$10,418.74, including $784.50 in legacies. During the year there have 
been 130 different names on the home missionary roll, though not 
more than about eighty men have been in the service at any one time. 
They have supplied about 200 congregations. Fifteen churches have 
been organized, nine Home Missionaries have been ordained. Twelve 
houses of worship have been completed, and several have been repaired 
and improved. Seven churches have assumed self-support, and nearly 
all the dependent churches have been able to ask for a smaller amount of 
aid. Nineteen churches report revivals, and in many others there has 
been marked religious interest with additions on confession of faith. 

Mr. Warren writes: "The center of population in Michigan is about 
twenty-three miles north of the state-house at Lansing. If we draw an 
east and west line across the State through the center of the population 
we shall have a little more than a million people on each side of the line. 
Of the 288 Congregational churches reported in our last State Minutes, 
65, or fifty-seven per cent., are south of the center of jDopulation, and 23, 
or forty-three per cent., are north of the center of population. But the 
churches in the northern counties are newer and small. Of the 21,238 
Congregational members reported in our last Minutes, 14,770 or seventy 
per cent., live south of the center of population, and only 6,468, or thirty 
per cent., north of the center of population. Our last State census gives 
the seating capacity of the churches of all denominations in every county of 
the State. A study of the tables shows that a little more thau three fourths 
of all the churches in the State are provided for the million people who 
live south of the center of population, and less than one fourth for the 
million people who live north of the center of population. This fact 
furnishes plainest proof of the need of home missionary work in the 
northern counties of the State. 

"Our newest and neediest home missionary field in Michigan is the 
Upper Peninsula. No other part is developing so rapidly. Two lines of 
railway have been completed from east to west giving that part of the 
State direct communication with the Atlantic seaboard and also with the 
Pacific coast. Many shorter lines have also been recently completed. 
Along these new railways new towns are springing up in every part of 
the Peninsula and the older towns are growing as never before. The 
output of iron and copper and lumber is greatly increased. For example, 
the Lake Superior mines last year produced 4,667,652 tons of iron ore, — 
an increase of more than a million tons over the product of 1886. The 
building of the new railways, the great increase in mining and lumber- 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 131 

ing, ;m<l blie rapid settlement of the farming lands involve an unpre- 
cedented immigration. In the new villages that are springing up the 
people are without the Gospel. The demand for new work in Northern 
Michigan has never before been so great as it is to-day Our State Asso- 
ciation has voted to ask the help of the Home Missionary Society for 
only four years more. There is greatest danger that in our effort new to 
attain State self-support we shall fail to plant the churches which are 
needed in this newest, part of the State. The Congregational churches 
of Michigan have before them an opportunity of unequaled promise 
involving the gravest responsibility." 

MINNESOTA. 
Rev. John II. Moki.ky, Minneapolis, Superintendent. 

During the year ninety-one missionaries have heen employed, who 
have supplied 113 churches and ninety out-stations. This includes four- 
teen Scandinavians, two Bohemians and one German. The aided 
churches have contributed to benevolent objects $2,330.97. For Home 
Missions during the year the churches raised 19,160.94. 

Superintendent Morley writes, "Rev. Christian Mowery, our faithful 
missionary at New Ulm, died October 1, 1887. His influence in that Ger- 
man community was greatly blessed and others will reap where ha sowed. 

"In many respects we can report a favorable year's work. We felt the 
diminished appropriation and the pressure of debt, but fifteen new church 
edifices have been erected. Four parsonages have been secured. Three 
churches have been brought to self-support and ten new churches have 
been organized. Twenty-six cases of revival interest are reported. Mr. 
Henry Plant has been of great service holding meetings in different parts 
of the State. Mr. James Earle has been commissioned as an evangelist, 
and has done good service in the churches of the Northern Pacific Con- 
ference. Missionary conventions, in some of which Rev. W. G. Puddefoot 
assisted, have been held in several of the larger churches. We are strain- 
ing all our energies to raise 815,000 for Home Missions against $10,000 
raised during our last Association's year. General Missionary Herrick is 
proving himself to be the right man in the right place. He has labored 
especially in the western part of the State, where hisinfluence in starting 
Sunday schools and churches has been marked. 

New work has been neglected or postponed on account of financial 
stringency. The calls are now T pressing and are of two kinds. 

"First: In the cities and larger towns, Minneapolis, St. Paul, and 
Duluth, and their suburbs there is need of new churches. No work pays 
better than city work. To plant a church, help it liberally for a year or two 
and then make it self-supporting, with a good house all paid for, is what 
has been done and can be repeated. An outlay for two years also will give 
us a church that will become one of our heavily contributing churches. 
The church in St. Paul, which three years ago needed $700 aid from the 



132 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

Society, came to self-support eighteen months ago ; last year it took up a 
collection of $200 for Home Missions : this year it pays a salary of 
11,800. One in Minneapolis came to self-support, with its house built 
and paid for, in one year. Is it wise to neglect places where these things 
or things half as good can be accomplished ? 

" Secondly: We have a large country work which has been neglected. 
A little country town with an agricultural community around it with no 
regular preaching of the Gospel is not uncommon. Several appeals have 
come to us from such communities which have been neglected. With 
the incoming of population, with a few years of good harvest we could 
have churches in many of these districts moving slowly towards self-sup- 
port. Related as the city and the country are, the neglect of country 
work is disastrous to the city. If the country be not evangelized, then 
God save the city. In the Red River Valley there are many neglected 
communities which ought to be improved. That valley, with undeveloped 
resources which are yet to support an immense population, should be 
cared for to-day. In the northern part of the State new railroads are 
projected. In the Xortheast, mines are being developed and an incoming 
population waits to feel the touch of the Gospel. For all this new work 
we are ready if we have the money to meet it." 

KANSAS. 
Rev. L. P. Broad, Topeka, Superintendent. 

The receipts of the Society from Kansas have been $3,937.93, including 
a legacy of $200. 

The Superintendent writes, "I labor under the disadvantage of 
having been in office but two months, and of following one of the best 
informed and most successful of superintendents, brother Blanchard. His 
three years' service in the State has been of inestimable value. He unified, 
spiritualized, and systematized our work, proclaimed unerringly the true 
principles of the whole missionary service, inspired his co-laborers with 
something of' his own enthusiasm and devotion, and brought in good men 
to fill the vacancies. 

"The churches are still united and luypeful. One hundred and one 
missionaries have been employed during the year for a longer or shorter 
period. They labor in thirty-seven fields and supply 144 churches besides 
51 out-stations. One hundred and forty Sunday-schools are connected 
with these churches and their out-stations, fifteen of which were gathered 
this year. Ten new churches have been organized, and notwithstanding 
the failure of crops in many parts of the State, seven churches have 
assumed self-support. A general spirit of revival has prevailed. About 
two thirds of our missionary churches have held extra series of meetings, 
and in others there has been a quiet ingathering. 

" Looking at the entire State with our work in view, the signs were 
never more cheering for aggressive work. We have an area of 81,700 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 133 

square miles. Massachusetts has 8,040 square miles, yet with about ten 
times the area we have about the same population as Massachusetts. "We 
are trying to get ready spiritually for the sixteen millions of people in 
Kansas which would give us only as dense a population as Massachusetts, 
and which are coming to us at the rate of 150,000 per year. All parts of 
the State are now open for occupancy. Give the western third of the 
State the same time for development that the eastern third has had, and 
there seems to be no natural hindrance to prevent its being equally pros- 
perous. A thrifty class of people is entering there, particularly in the 
North-west, and intend to hold their own ground. More miles of railway 
were constructed in Kansas during 1887 than in any other State of the 
Union, the record being 2,(>70 miles. Our people are energetic and 
young. The small proportion of old people is often remarked by stran- 
gers. There is no preponderating foreign element. Our temperance laws 
help to purify our social and civil life and attract a good class of immi- 
grants. On the whole, as some of us think, there never was a time so 
favorable as the present for planting Congregational churches in Kansas, 
because the county seats are mostly located and the main centers of the 
State are known and established. The difficulty has been in former 
years, to know what towns were permanent and where it would pay to 
spend our money and efforts. But now the difficulty is practically 
removed. It seems providential from this point of view that we did not 
enter some centers earlier. 

" Kansas we may say has had three periods in its history — the frontier, 
the constructive, and the growing period. Dividing the years into four- 
teens for convenience, we have from 185G to 1870 as the frontier period; 
1870 to 1884 as the constructive period; and 1884 to 1898 as the growing 
period. In frontier times the Society had to work somewhat in the dark, for 
nothing was settled. When the war was past and people constructed 
towns, homes, laws, schools, churches, etc., our points of work could be 
selected better, and every church with life in it could be expected to 
advance towards self-support. But now in the growing times, when the State 
itself is constructed, its main cities located, and the places known where 
Congregationalism belongs, there would seem to be no excuse for making 
mistakes in planting our churches or for holdiug on to dead mistakes of 
former periods. We will try to th ink caref uly and critically about each appro- 
priation, as heretofore, and with reference to the most satisfactory out- 
come in the State. We count it the wisest policy to put considerable 
money at first into a new enterprise in a large center, on the principle 
of the first Napoleon in successful war, ' To converge a superior force 
on the critical point at the critical time.' " 

NEBRASKA. 
Eev Jonx L. Maile, Omaha, Superintendent. 
The churches of Nebraska have contributed to the Society during the 



134 THE HOME ZIISSIOXART. July, 

year $4,516.41. Eighty-nine ministers, including four employed in 
general work, have been under commission during the whole or a part of 
the year. 

The number of pastors in self-supporting churches is forty-three, and 
of these seventeen have during the year severed their immediate connec- 
tion with the Society. Of the self-supporting churches five are pastorless 
and two are supplied by Home .Missionaries. Eight students served new 
fields during the summer. One hundred and sixteen home missionary 
churches and forty out-stations have been regnlarly supplied with preach- 
ing during the whole or a part of the year. Eight ministers were 
ordained. Additions to the churches Were approximately as follows": by 
confession, 750; by letter, 806; total, 1,556. Fourteen churches have been 
organized with an aggregate membership of 212. Twenty-one houses of 
worship, costing $98,400, have been dedicated. The total Sunday-school 
membership of the State is 11,575, with an average attendance of 7,839. 
Twenty-two churches have come to self-support. 

" The population of Nebraska," says Superintendent Maile, "is esti- 
mated at 865,000; of Bohemians including Poles, 35,000; of Scandinavians, 
100,000; of Germans, 10,000. For the Bohemians we have one mission 
and a minister who is acquiring the language. Among the Germans we 
have nineteen churches, but no work organized for the Scandinavians, 
although here and there individuals attend our services. In Omaha is a 
very large Swedish Free Mission congregation, which has informal but 
very friendly relations with us. 

" During the year 1887 there were constructed in Nebraska about 2,000 
miles of railroad, and located thereon are scores of towns and villages to 
the great proportion of which the Gospel has not yet been given. The 
territory of one of our associations is traversed by 645 miles of railroad, 
one half of which invites exploration aud wise occupancy. 

" Summary. — 1. An usually large number of churches coming to self- 
support. 

" 2. An increase of contributions to the Society. 

(i 3. Great enlargement of our work in the chief city of the State 
and other important centers. 

" 4. Providential circumstances indicating closer relations with our 
English-speaking population. 

"5. Encouraging results in evangelistic work and need of increased 
labor in that department. 

" 6. Practically an unlimited scope for extension of our work and 
numerous openings of first importance. 

" 7. The perils and the sufferings resulting from retrenchment amply 
demonstrated. 

"8. The need of great advance in contributions from all friends of 
the Society. 

"■9. The Gospel preached in its purity and power and a copious out- 



; 



isss. THE IK) ME MISSIONARY. 135 

pouring of the Holy Spirit resulting in quickened spiritual life is our 
crowning ased." 

NORTH NEBRASKA, BLACK HILLS (DAKOTA TER.), AND NORTHEAST 

WYOMING. 

Rev. Harmon Bross, Chadron, General Missionary. 

NORTH NEBRASKA. — Eleven missionaries have been in commission 
during the wholeora part of the year, in connection with sixteen churches 
and out-stations. They report a church membership of nearly 300. 
Thirteen Sunday-schools report a membership of over 640. 

THE BLACK HILLS AND EAST WYOMING. 

Black Hills. — Seven missionaries have been in service during the 
wholeora pail of the year, laboring with seven churches and out-stations, 
who report 134 church members and 512 scholars in the Sunday- 
schools. 

North-East Wyoming. — Rev. Thomas Kent labored part of the 
year at Lusk. He was succeeded by Rev. David T. Jenkins, who reports 
a church membership of 11 and 36 scholars in the Sunday-school. A 
house of worship has also been built. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
Rev. Hiram D. Wiard, Mitchell, Dakota. 

The Treasury received from this field $1,534.55. 

Sixty-seven missionaries have served the Society during the year, 
laboring in connection with 104 churches and forty-five out-stations. 
Eleven churches have been organized. One church has come to self-sup- 
port. Seven houses of worship and four parsonages have been built. 
Superintendent Wiard writes, "The review of the year shows some pro- 
gress, but not what we had hoped for and pictured a year ago. We have 
had no boom in South Dakota. Only 84,000 people came in last year, 
and these arriving with the order ' no more new work ' did not help us as 
in past years. We pushed our work as far as it could be pushed among 
the people who were in need of assistance for temporal support. I am 
convinced that the people of this new country will do as much for the 
Gospel as any people I ever saw. But getting support where there is no 
money is as difficult to accomplish as the discovery of perpetual motion. 
Our gains in new churches were made by asking our missionaries to 
spread out. This most of the missionaries have been quite ready to do. 
Our General Missionary, Mr. Tomlin, has been of great service in our 
work. Churches where he labored have in every case been greatly 
strengthened spiritually and the calls for assistance come to us so rapidly 
that we could now use four evangelists with profit. 

" The additions to our churches this year have been a greater propor- 



136 THE HOME MISSIONARY July, 

tion of them on confession of faith than last year. This tells of the 
kind of work being done. I cannot speak too highly of most of our mis- 
sionaries. They are a kind of men to be glad of. 

"The Sioux reservation is to open to settlers. Already the C. M. & 
St. P. R. R. has let the contract for building 180 miles of road west from 
Chamberlain. The C. & N. W. R. R. will build west from Pierre. 
This means from thirty to forty towns to be started which we must look 
out for. There are now at least 100 communities in which Ave could 
profitably work." 

NORTH DAKOTA AND EAST MONTANA. 

Rev. H. C. Simmons, Fargo, North Dakota, Superintendent. 

The receipts from this missionary district have been $806.72, including 
$166.67 in legacies. 

North Dakota has had thirty-three missionaries supplying forty-nine 
churches and sixteen out-stations. Seven new churches have been organ- 
ized. Two, Grand Forks and Valley City, have voted to assume self-sup- 
port, and Wahpeton is expected to undertake its own support when its 
secures a new pastor. Three houses of worship have been erected and the 
church at Dickinson has decided to build. 

Harlem, under the labors of G. B. Barnes, has had a precious revival 
season, while Mayville has received a blessing with some considerable 
additions to the church. Other places have had more or less special 
religious interest, although the stormy weather the past winter has pre- 
vented work that had been planned. A series of fellowship meetings has 
been held among part of the churches, Mr. Henry Plant, of Minneap- 
olis, helping to their great quickening. 

Superintendent Simmons writes, " The situation of North Dakota, 
crossed, as it is from east to west, by two great transcontinental systems 
of railway, places it upon one of three great thoroughfares of the country. 
The snow-fall is usually so light that there is very little interruption to 
travel. The famous Red River Valley, in the eastern part of the Terri- 
tory, the bottom of the ancient Lake Agassiz, has a deposit of 150 feet, 
according to Prof. Wright, furnishing the richest soil in America, and 
is regarded by outside investors as the safest place to invest money of all 
the newer regions of the west. North Dakota has the best of furnishing 
for a grand State. But the best of all is the fine grade of boys and girls 
raised in her healthy climate. One of the principal things to report for 
the year is the incorporation and opening of Fargo College under the 
fostering care of the North Dakota General Association of Congregational 
Churches. Applications from students are coming for another year, 
Avhilethe class prepared to enter as freshmen will go forward into real col- 
lege work. 

" Eastern Montana has made no gains in churches, for the reason that 
the Society has been unable to plant them. Grand opportunities lie open 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 13 7 

in that groat Territory, rich in mineral resources as well as in the cattle 
and farming interest. Great Falls, on the Upper Missouri River, by its 
favorable location, its immense water-power, the large capital being 
invested in smelters, in accessibility to the valuable products of the mines, 
its rich ores of iron, its coal and limestone is destined to become a great 
manufacturing city. 

" The openings for new Avork both in North Dakota and Montana are 
almost without number. Give us men and money to evangelize this 
great region by the Gospel of our blessed Lord, and in a few years we will 
show a work that will help to make America, east and west, a safe place 
to live in. Neglect these opportunities, allow these great regions to fill 
up with a people destitute of churches and Christian schools, and the East 
as well as the West must suffer. " 

COLORADO AND EAST WYOMING. 
Rev. C. M. Sanders, Denver, Col., Superintendent. 

" The contributions to the A. H. M. S. from this district were $1,343. 95 
— a gain of $542 32 over last year. Twenty-eight men have labored under 
the commission of this Society, serving thirty-one churches and out-sta- 
tions. Fourteen new pastors have been welcomed. Two church edifices 
have been dedicated. One parsonage has been secured, others projected. 
The ninth church in Denver has been organized, and 345 have been added 
to the churches, more than one half of them on confession of faith. To 
the Sunday-schools of the aided churches 300 members have been added. 
Fellowship meetings have been held with many of the churches with 
results that encourage the pressing of this branch of work more the com- 
ing year. The long distances which separate many of our churches 
make such fellowship meetings peculiarly desirable in this region. 

"And now," writes Superintendent Sanders, "a word as to the 
future. President Lincoln, twenty-five years ago, asked ex-Governor 
Evans, of Colorado. ' What do you find in the Eocky Mountains?' To this 
the Governor replied, ' It is a country abounding in all the natural 
resources that are to be found in all the other States of the Union. ' Now 
this man who has the eyes of a prophet, a heart for the truth as it is in 
Christ's Gospel, two hands for all that goes to build up a great nation, 
who is still young at seventy-four, and who has just brought to its com- 
pletion a gigantic railway scheme, which opens a short line from Den- 
ver to the great sea, is even now prophesying marvelous things for the 
Queen City of the Rockies. This city is to be exalted and to become a 
metropolis of the* whole Rocky Mountain region, and ultimately to rank 
as the third city of the Union. Already the thoughts of multitudes are 
turning this way and hosts of the choicest young men and women from 
eastern homes are flocking hither, pitching their tents and fixing their 
destinies among us. The next five years will add nearly half a mill- 



i:;s THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

ion souls-to our population. I bring to the attention of the Congrega- 
tionalists of America, not alone the twenty or more open fields where 
new work might be commenced at once, but I put before them the great 
Centennial State, with the adjacent Territory of Wyoming (a section 
covering over 200,000 square miles) and 1 call in the name of the Lord of 
Hosts for help to take these for the King of Glory. Let our occupancy 
of regions so vast, so rich, be worthy of the ancestry from which we are 
descended. Build no Doubting Castle beside Plymouth Pock. " 

UTAH, IDAHO, WEST MONTANA. 
Rev. Winfield S. Hawkes, Salt Lake City, Superintendent. 

The contributions to the Treasury from this district have been $235.02. 
Fourteen missionaries have been employed during the whole or a part 
of the year in connection with thirty churches and out-stations. Twenty 
Sunday-schools report a membership of 1,680. 

The Superintendent writes: " Rev. A. J. Bailey, with Mrs. Bailey, has 
sustained services in all his stations. At Slaterville the people wished a 
school and regular religious services, and to secure them built a house of 
sufficient size and offered it for the proposed use. In January your 
Superintendent preached the dedication sermon, and a New West school 
and regular Sunday-services have since been sustained. 

" In January the Superintendent began serving Park City church on 
alternate Sundays, and on February 12th sent to them as preacher Rev. 
C. L. Corwin, recently from Colorado, who proved so acceptable that 
they have engaged his services and he is now acting as pastor, much to 
their gratification. The Phillips Church, Salt Lake City, have secured 
Rev. John E. Hurlbut, for many years pastor at Mittineague, Mass. — a 
man of rare qualifications for the place. 

" I propose to secure the best man possible to put in charge of the mis- 
sion work of the nineteenth and twentieth wards of Salt Lake City for 
Sunday service and pastoral duty and to preach in Bountiful, Centerville, 
and Farmington on week nights. Many believo that Mormonism in 
Salt Lake City is tottering to its fall. We must throw into the place all 
the force possible in the next two years. " 

NORTH CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA. 
Rev. James H. Warren, D.D., San Francisco, Superintendent. 

The contributions to the A. H. M. S. from this district have been 
$5,032-85. Forty-nine missionaries have been under commission during 
the whole or a part of the year performing over twenty-nine years of ser- 
vice in connection with fifty-five churches and forty-five out-stations. 
Fifty-six Sunday-schools report a membership of 3,373. Eight churches 
have been organized and three have reached self-support. Five houses 
of worship have been built. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 139 

Superintendent Warren writes: " The year has been notable in its 
many-sided and important developments. First: What seemed for a 
time to be temporary excitement in the enormous rush of immigration, 

iiktc birds of passage coming for the winter only, is turning out to be 
a permanent thing. Nearly four fifths have come, and are coming to 
stay. This is no guess work. Railroad officials who speak from the 
records of this and other States say that the immigration to California is 
unprecedented in the history of any State or Territory of our country. 
The lowest estimate puts our census now at 1,300,000. 

•• Second: During this last year the great work of home evangelization 
sized up to such magnitude that this held had to he divided into two 
missionary districts, and a Superintendent commissioned to take charge 
of the new district. This important step was not taken a day too soon. 
It has not lessened the: work of the superintendents, since they find 
themselves burdened and taxed with all they can possibly do in looking 
after the wants of their separate imperial parishes. Owing to this same 
pressure, a new (ieneral Association was organized in Southern California, 
the request for such an organization coming from the General Associa- 
tion of the State. The new body numbers already nearly forty churches 
and is said to be fully manned. This leaves over 100 churches as the 
present constituency of the Northern Association, showing that the 
new body has not been constituted at the expense of the old one. The 
third notable event has been the unprecedented increase of new churches 
in the State at large, especially in the southern country. Fourth: Evi- 
dently a new era has come to us in the matter of contributions. With- 
out a dollar from legacies our churches have nearly or quite doubled the 
large amount given in any previous year. In 1881 we were credited 
with $1,893. This year we are in sight of $9,000. This increase is from 
the pressure felt by our churches, that California must have the Gospel in 
larger measure than before, to meet the tremendous wants springing up 
every day. " 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

Rev. James T. Ford, Los Angeles, Superintendent. 

The contributions from this district have been $2,629.51. Twenty- 
five missionaries have been under commission during the whole or part of 
the year, in connection with twenty-six churches and twelve out-stations. 
Eleven churches have been organized. The Superintendent writes, "I 
feel sad that I cannot tell you of prevailing revivals of religion in our 
home missionary churches. But the year has been one of ingathering and 
saving to the church of members who came to us from abroad, rather than 
of ingathering from the world; of the building of material houses of wor- 
ship rather than the spiritual temple. Nevertheless several of our churches 
have received a goodly number on confession of faith, ninety-two in all. 
Eight houses of worship have been erected or made ready for use, and three 



140 TUB HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

are still incomplete. Three of our churches assumed the entire support 
of their ministers. The amount of missionary funds expended in aid of 
these churches was $7,480. ' 

"The marvelous growth of Southern California the previous year has 
continued through the year just closed. The district is helieved to have 
doubled its population during the two years. The rage for real estate 
speculation has subsided, but material improvement has gone forward as 
never before. The face of many a village aud city has been changed 
almost beyond recognition by the multiplication of its homes. The sound 
of the hammer has been heard everywhere, and lumber and lime could 
not be brought to us fast enough to supply the demand. Public improve- 
ments have gone forward with like rapidity. Every principal town 
has its street-car line, its motor roads, its electric railways reaching out 
into the suburban territory and most of them have been built or com- 
pleted within the year. Much has been done to develop the mineral 
resources of the country. The planting of vines and fruit trees, which 
Avas neglected during the real estate craze, is now taken up with renewed 
activity. New manufacturing enterprises are undertaken. The people 
who come here for climate's sake and for climate's sake, are bound to 
stay, must have the means of a livelihood. The indications are that the 
fever of speculation is past and that we have entered upon a period of 
real, rapid, permanent growth. 

"But the prevailing tendencies are intensely materialistic. We can 
obtain lots for church buildings and raise money to build them, but it is 
not so easy to obtain support, either financial or spiritual, from the people. 
Those who come to us from eastern churches are in danger of being 
caught by the world's spirit and of being lost to the heavenly life. We 
must push our Gospel work with new vigor or this fair land is doomed to 
be of the earth earthy. We need all the help we can get from the pray- 
ers and contributions of those who love the Lord everywhere. Men from 
abroad must send and bring money here to invest for heavenly gain, as 
they have sent and brought it by millions to invest for earthly increase. 
Those who are directed hither in the providence of God that they may 
prolong life by finding a more genial clime, must come as missionaries of 
Christ sent by him for the salvation of his people." 

OREGON AND EAST WASHINGTON. 
Rev. George H. Atkinson, D.D., Portland, Oregon, Superintendent. 

The receipts from the district within the year were $1,542.96, of which 
Oregon contributed $981.04, and Bast Washington $561.92. Thirty- 
eight missionaries, besides three self-supporting ministers, have been 
employed during a whole or part of the year. Nineteen of these labored 
in Oregon, serving twenty-seven churches and twenty-five out-stations. 
In East AVashington twenty have been in commission, beside two self- 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 141 

supporting brethren, serving thirty-five churches and twenty-five sta- 
tions. Four churches in Oregon have become self-supporting. 

" During the year," writes the superintendent, "three missionaries have 
died. Rev. II. R. Foster, after a few months of devoted and successful 
work as pastor of the church in Walla Walla, developed consumptive 
symptoms. A change to Southern California gave partial relief. But in 
a few months he passed away, leaving many to mourn his loss. 

"Rev. N. F. Cobleigh, the beloved General Missionary of Eastern 
Washington, having over-worked, suddenly sunk under a malignant attack 
of typhoid fever and died at Walla Walla, November 26, 1887, aged forty- 
three years. His live years of pastoral and missionary life were full of 
Christian enterprise and most zealous service. Ministers, churches, con- 
gregations, and communities felt the power of his preaching and example, 
and hold him in grateful remembrance. 

"Rev. John E. Elliott, after about three months of kindly willing ser- 
vice as pastor of the Atahnani and North Yakima churches, suddenly lost 
strength and died, January 19, 1S88. His age was about fifty-eight. His 
life in the ministry had been mostly passed in Connecticut, Iowa and 
Nebraska, which gave him a fine experience for successful work iu his 
new field to which he had been most cordially welcomed. 

''Four new churches have been organized and two re-organized at 
important points in Oregon, while others have been planned. In East 
Washington four have been formed, two German, one Welsh and one 
English, three re-organized, and others in prospect. Ten church sites 
have been secured, three houses of worship have been completed and 
dedicated, three others are now ready for dedication, two more are nearly 
finished, while plans, specifications and subscriptions are prepared for 
two or three to be erected this year. Three parsonages have been built 
or bought and occupied by the pastors. 

"Most of the churches and congregations have increased in numbers 
and in some cases doubled. In other cases removals have depleted 
churches of a fourth or a third of their membership. One church of 
eighty-five on the roll assumed self-support but now finds thirty of its 
members out of the State. Such unsettled moving people, helpful while 
present, cannot be relied upon for permanent work. Such changes are 
ths rule in new States and Territories. For want of men some of our mis- 
sionary churches have not been visited during the year, and of them no 
favorable report can be made. 

"The inflow of immigration seems to be doubling in volume by rail- 
road and steamship, so that the gain to Oregon and Washington this 
year will be 60,000 at the lowest estimate. Some may ask where these 
new populations will find homes and means of support. But these two 
States have only about half a million people now, while their area 
equals two and three sevenths that of all the six New England States. 
Our resources from laud and water, our food power of agricultural fruit 



142 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

land, of wheat fields and pastures for flocks and herds, of lumber, of 
coal and iron, of lime and cement, of clays and building-stone, of silver 
and gold, copper and lead, are far greater per square mile than New Eng- 
land ever possessed. 

"The race problem will in large part be solved here with Asia. Our 
people have been the quickest to foresee and make a place through 
divinely-ordained missions for Indian citizenship. Providence is lead- 
ing and enlightening Asiatic peoples to understand and claim citizenship 
for themselves and to enforce their claim at home and abroad. 

" Was there too much done for early New England ? Are there too 
many ministers, and churches, and Christian schools, and missionary 
agencies established and sustained there now ? Is one to every village 
and settlement too many to keep alive the conscience and knowledge of 
the Truth ? If these same methods be used to save our nation as in the 
past, and if the messengers of Christ must be trained for his service as 
of old, is not the solution of the problem imperative at this moment ? 
Forty years have done something for Christ's kingdom here. Shall we 
devise liberal things for the next forty years and for the millions who 
will surely occupy these regions?" 

WEST WASHINGTON. 
Rev. Samuel Greene, Acting Superintendent, ' Seattle. 

The contributions from this section of the Territory, to the A. II. 
M. S., were $272.81. Fourteen missionaries labored during the whole 
or part of the year in connection with fifteen churches and eighteen 
out-stations. These aided churches report a membership of 324, and 
nineteen Sunday-schools have over 690 scholars. 

Mr. Greene writes, "Of the twenty-seven Congregational churches of 
West Washington, one, Plymouth, of Seattle, is self-supporting. One, the 
church on Whidby Island, is temporarily so by allowing the pastor to 
receive a large share of his support from the Academy which he serves 
as principal. Two are connected with the Indian work of the A. M. A. 
Fifteen are supplied with pastors by the Society, leaving eight without any 
regular pastoral work or preaching of the Gospel. Two of these eight, 
until your treasury will admit of an increased force of workers, ought to 
be supplied at stated intervals by neighboring pastors. Two or three 
counties where Sunday-schools have gone, but where, as yet, the Society 
has not entered, ought to be furnished with workers in the coming 
summer. The men are offering, but Ave are obliged to say we have no 
means for their support. 

" As yet there are ten counties in this part of our Territory without a 
Congregational church, and more without a minister of our body. People 
are now flocking to this region as never before. Cities are filling up 
and extending their limits and populations with great rapidity, and in 



1888. 77/ A' HOME MISSIONARY. 143 

the country the woods are full of people until ubout every available 
quarter-section of hind is occupied." 

Rev. ( '. C. Otis has been recalled from the superintendence of this 
field to the position of Financial Secretary of the Society, with his office in 
.New York. Rev. Reuben A. Beard, of Fargo, Dakota, has been 
appointed as his successor and is considering the call. It is hoped that 
with his largo experience as a pastor in Dakota and his intimate 
acquaintance with the home missionary work he will assume the super- 
intendency of West Washington. 

WORK AMONG IMMIGRANT POPULATIONS. 

SLAVONIC DEPARTMENT. 
Rev. Henry A. Sciiauffleu, Cleveland, Ohio, Superintendent. 

The year has been one of marked and encouraging results in this 
department. Mr. Schauffler writes, "A year ago Cleveland Triple 
Station was in great straits. Mr. Price had left, February 8, and no one 
had been found to take his place. Work pressed more than ever while 
time and strength failed. But the Lord remembered us, and on the 
first of July, Iiev. J. R. Nichols, for some years the Congregational 
pastor at Garrettsville, Ohio, came to Cleveland and devoted himself to 
the Bohemian work. His mere presence here was a great relief, to say 
nothing of the help he was able to give from the very start, in English 
preaching, holding meetings, and in general care of the work during 
the absence of the senior missionary. Before he had been here many 
months Mr. Nichols was the means of organizing a Y. P. S. C. E. at 
Bethlehem, which has had marked success and has been a source of 
profit to the young people in every way. For a large class of younger 
hoys, Mr. Nichols started the Bethlehem Boy's Band. In July, Messrs. 
Mussil and Bobitzky, two Bohemian missionary students from St. 
Chrischona, arrived to spend the summer in Cleveland, learning English 
in preparation for study at Oberlin. They also aided greatly in the 
Bohemian part of the work till the term began, and since then they have 
been among the most active and useful of the Oberlin Slavic students of 
the Cleveland work. In October Mr. Phillip Reitinger arrived also 
from St. Chrischona. He has been especially engaged in the work at 
East Cleveland and has charge of the Bethlehem choir, which has grown 
in numbers and efficiency under his excellent leadership. 

" The statistics of the year show an increase of numbers attending all 
the services, with three exceptions, which are the Bethlehem English 
evening service, the Bethlehem Young People's meeting, and the Cyril 
Sunday-school. The reason for the falling off in the first two cases may 
be found in the interregnum caused by Mr. Price's absence. The Cyril 
Sunday-school has suffered from the removal of the new chapel and the 
organization of a Methodist Sunday-school in the old one. The average 



144 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

weekly attendance at Bethlehem of all services for the previous year 
was 663, and for the year under review 702. The average weekly attend- 
ance of all services at Cyril was 239 last year, and for the year under 
review 256. The average attendance at the East Cleveland Bohemian 
services during the previous year was forty-five, for the year under review 
sixty-five. The average weekly attendance for all services in the three 
stations during the year previous was 'J47; during the year under review 
1,024, not including one hundred Bohemian children in the East Madison 
Avenue Congregational Sunday-school, which brings the average up to 
1,124." 

Cyril Chapel. — The most important events of the .year, aside from 
the accession of new laborers, were the dedication of the new Cyril Chapel 
on the west side, and the formation of Bethlehem Church. Through the 
munificence of E. W. Metcalf, Esq., who gave $1,000 for the object, it 
became possible to erect Cyril Chapel, a pretty building and sufficiently 
commodious for the work. The dedication was a very interesting event. 
In the morning Bohemian services were held in which two of the gradu- 
ates of the Oberlin Slavic department participated. In the afternoon a 
goodly number of Congregational churches joined with the Bohemians in 
services held in both languages. Great interest was added by the 
presence by Rev. C. H. Rappard, the head of the St. Chrischona Mission- 
ary Institution, who was on a visit to the pupils of that institution in 
this country. We were asked to invite several Bohemian mutual aid 
societies to join in the dedication services. The board did so, but espec- 
ially requested that they should not come with bands of music on the 
Sabbath. They did not come at all, and the congregations, though 
averaging considerably more than the previous, have not been large. 
What the Cyril Chapel region needs of all things is a minister of its own. 

Bethlehem Church. — In previous reports the reasons have been 
given which have hitherto prevented the formation of a church at the 
Bethlehem station. In the early part of 1888, at a conference of the Cleve- 
land Congregational pastors, the subject was thoroughly discussed and the , 
Bohemian Mission Board immediately began- taking steps for the organ- 
ization. It was resolved that the Board should call the council, and 
because it would be impossible for any council to take the time needful 
for the thorough examination (in many cases through the medium of two 
languages) of the candidates for admission, a committee was appointed, 
consisting of three clergymen and three laymen who met the candidates 
for admission during an afternoon and evening nearly a week previous to 
the meeting of the council. It was an occasion of great interest, the 
examination bringing out very clearly a number of interesting facts, 
among which we may notice, first, that the experience of converted 
Catholics was fully as clear and satisfactory as that of those educated in 
the Old Country as Protestants ; and secondly, that, generally speaking, 
the experience of those who had boon brought up in a Sunday-school was 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 145 

much clearer and more intelligent than that of those who had never 
enjoyed Sunday-school instruction. 

Dr. George R. Leavitt, of Cleveland, thus writes of this examination: 
"Seventy-one persons were examined with a view to admission. Ten of 
them were American, the most of whom presented letters. Forty-nine 
others were accepted. Twelve were placed upon the deferred list. Not 
more than two or three who offered themselves were manifestly destitute 
of religious life. Several of those received were Catholics. None gave 
clearer evidence than these of a change of heart. Two had been avowed 
infidels. Between thirty and forty were converts under the ministry of 
Mr. SchaufHer and his associates. I do not know but that this was the 
best class of converts I ever saw. The conviction of sin, the conviction 
of grace, the manifest sincerity and tenderness and humility and definite- 
ness of purpose found in all of them, made the examination so remark- 
able that oneof the committee said, " This is the most memorable day of 
my Christian life." Half of the candidates could not speak English and 
were examined through an interpreter. The test questions asked were 
these: Are your sins forgiven? How were they forgiven? How do 
you keep the Lord's day ? What are your views of the use of intoxicating 
liquors? Why do you wish to unite with the church?" 

Keturning to Mr. Schauffler's report: "The services on Easter Sun- 
day morning, when the newly formed Bethlehem Church met to commem- 
orate at once the dying love and the resurrection glory of the Lord, were 
most tender and impressive. A large congregation was present. Especially 
interesting was the ordination of two deacons, one English-speaking and 
the other Bohemian. The one a genuine son of New England, from the 
Green Mountains, the other born in the land of Huss, in childhood 
taught to pray to the Virgin Mary, in manhood disgusted with the Roman 
priesthood and driven into unbelief, but now a humble and joyful 
follower of the Lord Jesus. It was a scene never to be forgotten, a bright 
promise of many such scenes in the future. The end of the year is much 
better than the beginning, and leaves us full of joy for what has been 
accomplished, and hopefulness for the future." 

Summary of the Slavic Mission Field. — In Cleveland genuine progress 
in all departments, increased attendance on all services, increased number 
and efficiency of missionary force, a larger and more useful Bible Readers' 
School, widening and quickening of work among the young, genuine 
though moderate growth, spiritually, in Cyril field, increased interest at 
East Cleveland, formation of Bethlehem Church with fifty-six members 
and brighter prospects than ever for the future. 

Polish Work, Cleveland and Toledo. — Suffered from the defec- 
tion and unchristian conduct of some of the workers, yet full of promise 
if faithfully worked. 

In Detroit. — Much faithful work done and seed sown, but great 
hindrances from the bitter dissensions and fightings among the Poles 



146 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

themselves and their persecution of any who leaned towards Protest- 
antism. 

In Chicago. — Mr. Adams has had' great difficulty to contend with, in 
consequence of indequate help and the rivalry of the Methodist and 
recently established Baptist Bohemian Mission. But the work has made 
solid progress, hs is abundantly shown by the formation of a church with 
thirty-two members. There is better prospect of a suitable church 
building being erected than hitherto. The Bohemian Christian news- 
paper, "Pravada," is proving a great power for good, and gives a unity 
and a wide-spread influence to the Bohemian mission work of the Con- 
gregational churches throughout the country. 

Minnesota. — Is a deeply interesting and very promising field. Mr. 
Prucha has done admirable work and is the right man for the place. The 
new Bohemian chapel, dedicated October 16, in St. Paul, gave great im- 
petus to the work. Miss Bochek, efficient and successful as a Bible-reader. 
The Protestant colonies, Silver Lake and Hopkins, eager to have Mr. 
Prucha preach to them, and promise much good. Bohemian preaching 
in the Congregational Church, Glencoe, well attended. Outlook on the 
whole field very bright. 

In Iowa. — Mr. John Rundus, stationed at Iowa City, has sown much 
seed in spite of great obstacles. It is one of the hardest fields in the 
country, but the signs are good. A lot has been bought and preparation 
is made for building a chapel. Other Bohemian colonies, some Protestant, 
reveal an earnest desire to hear the Word. 

In Nebraska. — Rev. M. J. P. Thing, at Omaha, has made progress 
in the study of Bohemian, and St. Mary's Avenue Church has successfully 
carried on the Bohemian Mission Sunday-school and is holding on till 
work can also be done in Bohemian. Bohemian Protestant colonies in 
Nebraska, of which three have church buildings and one is about to 
build, are eagerly waiting for preachers. 

In St. Louis. — Plymouth Church is interested in the 12,000 or 14,000 
Bohemians of that city, but we have no Bohemian laborers yet to place there 

Oberlin Slavic Department. — Is in much better condition than 
ever, Prof. Leadingham devoting all his time to it and Mr. Mishkovsky 
having so much improved in health that he can do good work in his 
department. There are eight men beside Mr. Bastel in the Theological 
Seminary. There is prospect of more students to enter next fall. The 
Bible-readers' school in Cleveland has also been very prosperous, having 
seven pupils. It can not be carried on without a " Home," and we wait 
anxiously to see the result of the plea to the young people of the Con- 
gregational churches throughout the country to build a Home. 

SCANDINAVIAN DEPARTMENT. 
Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Superintendent. 
Mr. Montgomery, in making his annual report, says, " There were, on 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 147 

January 1st, 1888, not less than two million persona in the United States 
who were properly classed under the general name of Scandinavian. 
Nearly one half the present population of Minnesota is Scandinavian. 
This element hasdoubled within five years. M innesota may well be thank- 
ful for the desirable qualities of this race who shall so soon out-number 
all ot her peoples in the State. 

"There are now in the United States about 212 Swedish mission 
churches, 149 houses of worship, and 305 preaching stations. This is 
three times as many as my first estimate, yet is still under rather than 
over the exact facts. Of the thirty-live Swedish mission churches in 
New England, New York and Pennsylvania, live have joined the Con- 
gregational Associations, one has united with the Swedish Mission Union, 
while all the rest remain independent. Of the total 212 Swedish mission 
churches in the United States a few have joined Congregational Associa- 
tions, sixty belong to the Swedish Mission Union, while about 130 are 
yet entirely independent. Some of the churches have taken a collection 
for the American Board, to aid the sufferers by famine in East Turkey, 
which amounted to $2,749.96. 

" There have been thirty Scandinavian students in Carleton College 
during the past year, and thirty-nine Scandinavian theological students 
in the Chicago Seminary. 

" Among the Norwegians the work moves forward slowly but hope- 
fully. The overshadowing need in this direction is a newspaper in the 
Dano-Norwegian language, to make known among these people that 
Congregational churches are founded upon the simple and peaceful 
principles of the New Testament. 

" A startling fact for these times is that Northern Europe is sending 
new races to us, or rather, the rivulets which have been coming to us of 
the old races now suddenly swell to mighty streams. For fifty-nine years 
prior to 1880, Russia sent us only 58,000 of her people, but now sends 
22,000 during only ten months of last year. Finland, too, is now sending 
a wave of her lively and desirable immigrants which reached 7,000 during 
six months of 1887. And Iceland will soon empty all the people of her 
island upon us at the present rate. 

" At the request of the Secretaries of the Society, I visited Utah last 
autumn to learn how many Scandinavians had gone into Mormonism 
and to inquire what had been done for their religious needs. The 
Scandinavian Mormon population of Utah is now estimated at 40,000; 
of, these 6,000 are Swedes, 6,000 are Norwegian, and 28,000 are Danes. 
The official statistics of the Mormon Church report that their converts in 
these lands during thirty-one years reached the enormous total of 
132,766 persons, and that of these 21,000 emigrated to Utah. They 
began their beguilement of these people, in 1850, with four Mormon eld- 
ers from Utah and increased their missionary force until, in 1881, sixty- 
one Mormon missionaries from Utah were at work in Denmark, Sweden 



148 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

and Norway. Many polygamists are now hiding in Scandinavian coun- 
tries from the officers of the United States courts. The first great need 
is for a Scandinavian missionary for Utah whom the Lord shall anoint 
with Pauline powers, graces, and martyr spirit, who shall open the work 
and call to his aid the necessary additional helpers. For such a mission- 
ary we now pray and seek. 

" The next step taken was to do what the Lord burdened me to do 
against the mighty wickedness of Mormonism by seeking to awaken the 
public conscience to protest against the admission of Utah into the 
Union as a State. This I did by writing an article for the Congrega- 
tionalist, by making twenty addresses on Mormonism in various parts of 
the country, and by addressing the United States Senate Committee on 
Territories. To stem the tide of Scandinavian Mormon converts from 
the Old World, I wrote an article entitled ' Mormonism unmasked, a 
warning to the Scandinavians,' containing some 9,000 words specially 
prepared for the situation among these people, in which it was sought to 
lay bare the frauds and frightful enormities of this great evil. This 
article was translated into Swedish by Prof. Fridolf Pusberg, and into 
Dano-Norwegian by Prof. P. 0. Trandberg, both of Chicago Theologi- 
cal Seminary. Proof-sheets were sent to all the Scandinavian news- 
papers in the United States, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland and 
Iceland, being nearly 1,000 newspapers. In many of them it has 
already appeared. By this method it may fairly be said that we have 
reached about all the Scandinavian people with this exposure of Mor- 
monism, which can scarcely fail to counteract, to a some degree at least, 
the work of the Mormon missionaries among these people." 

As to the needs of the current year Mr. Montgomery adds, "We need 
more than can be told in words the funds which will enable us to employ 
at least ten additional missionaries beside those so much needed in Utah, 
who will supply at least thirty destitute places and give an occasional ser- 
vice to nearly 100 out-stations. During the past year the painful part of 
my work has been the necessary refusal, over and over repeated, to send 
missionaries to most needy and most promising fields, for want of means. 
While the Scandinavian population has been increasing with amazing 
rapidity during the past year, I have been obliged in the name of the Soci- 
ety to cut down our work instead of keeping it abreast of the increasing 
demands. Henceforward we can get the missionaries, especially in the 
Swedish work. Shall we have the funds, by means of which they may 
be sent?" 

GERMAN DEPARTMENT. 

Rev. Moritz E. Eveksz, Milwaukee, Wis., Superintendent. 

Mr. Eversz reports : " Our work has suffered a serious loss in the 
withdrawal of so enthusiastic and able a leader as Superintendent Al- 
brecht. When we remember, in addition, that our work was for eight 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 149 

months without a superintendent ; that two of our most valued workers 
died during that interval, while we never had anything like an adequate 
supply of real Congregational ministers — only two or three in fact, who 
might be called genuine children of our churches — it is not a matter of 
surprise that this report is not filled with such glowing details of vic- 
tories won as we all love to recount, and as inspire the soldier with new 
courage and zeal. And yet, even this year has in it much to inspire 
gratitude and courage. 

" Twochurches, Springfield, Mo., and Stockham, Neb., have built and 
dedicated neat and suitable houses of worship, without debt, by the aid 
of the Congregational Union. Dubuque. la., has completed the outside 
of a fine brick church, with steeple, the best building among our German 
churches. By the indomitable self-denial and perseverance of its pastor, 
all bills are paid up to this time, and, with a little timely aid, will be 
complete and ready for dedication by fall. Culbertson, Neb., is also 
building and will dedicate in June. 

" Half Day, 111., has organized a promising church, and is under the 
pastoral care of one of our German graduates of Chicago. Sedgwick 
Street, Chicago, has made long strides forward under the able ministra- 
tions of Dr. Zimmerman; while Bridgeport, also in Chicago, so long 
without a settled pastor, is looking up with new hope and zeal toward a 
brighter future. Pastor Sattler, the first fruits of Crete and Chicago 
Seminary, is settled there with fine prospects of a good work. 

"' Right here, it seems tome, is the weak point in our work. Born and 
bred in other churches, the men who have worked in our fields could not 
have that strong sense of loyalty and devotion to our work which are so 
important to success. Good men and honest most of them doubtless were, 
but the}' were not native and to ' the manner born.' Unfamiliar with 
American conditions and the resources of our system in times of difficulty 
and trial, they were apt to fail in working our system, and easily stam- 
peded to other folds, where the power of authority promised a more speedy 
settlement of their difficulties. 

" Now we are just reaching the point where young men converted in 
our churches and trained in our own institutions are beginning to take the 
field. True, their education is in many cases defective, owing to the short- 
ness of the time allowed them, and the annual changes in our corps of in- 
structors at Crete. But, now that the uncertainty of its finances is to be a 
thing of the past, we look forward with new hope. The appointment of 
Rev. Mr. Ramser, made possible by the promised aid of the A. H. M. S.,will 
command the confidence of the German churches, and thus secure a better 
attendance and larger gifts. On the former basis, Crete could not succeed. 

'"The General Convention at Omaha, held early this month, was a fine 
success. Tt served not only to unite our workers in a closer bond of sym- 
pathy and iuspire them with zeal, but it won to a large extent the sym- 
pathy and confidence of the American ministers present. 



150 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

" Looking to the Lord of the harvest to aid us in raising up more 
reapers, we go forward, confident that the A. H. M. S. will not let the 
work suffer for the want of the needed funds." 

CONCLUSION. 

Such is the story of the Sixty-second year. It is a record full of 
bright spots and most cheering auguries for the future. Yet over all is 
the shadow of one dark and forbidding cloud. Twice within a few 
months the Executive Committee has felt compelled to issue to its 
agents in the field, the decree "No more new work." It was a military 
necessity, without warrant, either in the marching orders of the Great 
Commander or in the Charter of the Society. An American Home 
Missionary Society in these critical times of our nation's hsitory should 
not only stand with face toward the future, but its step should be right on. 

In one of the Papers accompanying this report may be found a detailed 
estimate from our Superintendents of the amounts that are immediately 
and imperatively needed for new work. Their aggregate is more than 
$100,000. In another Paper will be found an appeal to Christian Lay- 
men and Ministers for an advance and united effort toward the solution 
of the home missionary problem. In the spirit of both these papers, 
the Executive Committee has voted to add to its regular assignment of 
funds the sum of 150,000 as a provisional apportionment for new work. 
This is but one half the amount needed. They call it "provisional" 
because it is a pledge made with a proviso — the proviso being that the 
churches shall raise the money. This means an addition during the present 
year of $50,000 to the receipts- of the Society. Will the churches respond ? 
Other missionary boards are meeting the exigency of these times by 
increased efforts and appropriations. But they can not do our work. 
Congregationalism has its own call and mission. Surely it is not for 
that polity on which the civil institutions of the thirteen States were 
originally fashioned, to draw back from its full share in shaping the 
new civilization of the West. "Within two years our own churches, by 
the effort of comparatively few, added $70,000 in one month to their 
home missionary gifts. What might they not accomplish by a general 
and united effort, an effort inspired by the needs and perils of the times, and 
consecrated by a passion for country, for souls, and for God ! 

In behalf of the Executive Committee : 

Walter M. Barrows, ) 

Secretaries. 



Joseph B. Clark, 



I 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 151 



< $#lo man's £l cp art m cut. 



THE SARATOGA MEETING. 

As a crown of rejoicing for the growth of the past year, and a happy 
omen for future work, thedayior the Woman's Meeting was one of June's 
brightest, and at the appointed hour crowds of earnest Christian women 
from all parts of our land gathered to receive new inspiration through the 
soul-stirring accounts from those who best know the present crisis, and 
our opportunity. The audience in itself was an inspiration to the 
speakers, each of whom was followed with the closest attention without a 
sign of weariness or restlessness during the entire afternoon. In answer 
to united prayer, a sacred Presence tilled the house, and we were con- 
scious of the overshadowing power of tlie Highest. 



MINUTES. 

The sixth annual meeting of the Woman's Department in connection 
with the sixty-second Anniversary of the American Home Missionary 
Society, was held on Wednesday, June 6th, 1888, at 2:15 P. M. 

By invitation of the Society, Mrs. J. A. Piddle, of Hartford, Con- 
necticut, presided, and Mrs. L. E. Perry, secretary of the Nebraska W. 
H. M. U., acted as scribe. 

The meeting was opened by singing the hymn '"God moves in a 
mysterious way." 

A roll-call of States showed the following representation: Maine, 2; 
New Hampshire, 7; Vermont, 32: Massachusetts, 252; Rhode Island, 2; 
Connecticut, 23; New York, 24; New Jersey, 2; Ohio, 4; Iowa, 2; Wis- 
consin, 1; Illinois, 1; Michigan, 2; Nebraska, 1; Colorado, 1; Minne- 
sota, 2; Missouri, 2; Tennessee, 1. The roll-call was the first exercise on 
the programme, and, as the church was but partially filled, several States 
were imperfectly represented. Eighteen, however, sent regularly 
appointed delegates — the largest representation on record. 

The selection of Scripture, Matt. xxv. 31-40, was read by Mrs. Piddle 
of Connecticut. 

Prayer was offered by Mrs. J. G. W. Cowles, President of the Ohio 
W. H. M. IT. 

An address of greeting was given by Mrs. Piddle. 

Rev. E. A. Adams gave an account of "The new Pohemian Church' ' 
in Chicago. 



152 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

Miss Marion Vincent Ellis, of Brooklyn, sang the hymn, "If I 
were a voice." 

" Early Recollections of the Mormons in Sweden" were presented by 
Mrs. Botilda Persson Moore, a native Swede. 

A hymn was sung, after which Mrs. Caswell led the aged Mrs. Schauf- 
fler to the front of the platform, introducing her to the audience as the 
Missionary Mother of the Missionary Schaufflers who have given their 
lives to home and foreign work. To this the audience responded by rising. 

An address to young ladies on the subject, " Have Salt in Yourselves, " 
was presented by Mrs. S. E. Eastman of the Granger School, Canan- 
daigua, New York. 

The Consecration Hymn was sung by Miss Ellis, followed by a few 
moments of silent prayer. 

In response to requests from many, Mrs. C. L. Goodell, of St. Louis, 
read a paper prepared for a meeting of the Officers of the State Unions, 
on the subject" Our Furnishing for our Work, "based upon the scripture, 
Joshua i. 10. 

An address upon "Rocky Mountain Experiences" was given by Mrs. 
J. W. Pickett, of White Water, Colorado. Mr. Lewis, a Polish Mission- 
ary in Detroit, gave a familiar talk upon " Every-day Work among the 
Poles." 

By requests from the audience Mrs. Schauffler said a few words, and 
offered prayer. 

An impromptu collection was taken as the nucleus of a fund for a 
church building at White Water, Colorado, where Mrs. Pickett has 
organized a church. 

Mrs. C. H. Taintor, of Chicago, Secretary of the Illinois TV. H. M. 
XL, exhibited a necklace which had been given for the Parsonage Fund, 
and made an appeal for contributions to build a missionary parsonage. 

Mrs. George M. Lane, President of the Michigan TV. H. M. S.., spoke 
briefly of the special work among the Poles in Michigan, and appealed to 
the Christian young women of the churches to take up the work of Bible- 
reading among the foreigners of their own cities. 

After singing "America," Rev. TV. G. Puddefoot made the closing 
address. 

After the doxology, the benediction was pronounced by Rev. A. H. 
Clapp, D.D. — Mrs. L. F. Berry, Scribe. 



ADDRESS OF GREETING. 

By Mrs. J. A. Biddle, Hartford, Ct. 

My Dear Sisters: In the name of the Officers of the American Home 
Missionary Society, I bid you a most cordial welcome to this grand 
national gathering. You have come from every section of this vast 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 153 

country; you have come from historic New England, from the rich 
Pacific Slope, .from the bustling, enthusiastic Northwest, from the 
swiftly developing Southern States, from the solid center of our Union, 
because you are actuated by common sentiments of patriotism and of 
love to our blessed Master. It is a great and inspiring thought that, as 
here assembled, we represent the Christian women of America. It is a 
thought which may well lill us with a profound and almost overwhelm- 
ing sense of responsibility. 

When the officers of the American Home Missionary Society called 
upon me to perform the duty of presiding at this annual meeting, I 
gladly responded to their call, because it seemed to me no higher honor 
could be conferred upon an American woman then that of being identi- 
fied with the work of this beloved and honored Society, which under God 
has done so much to preserve the Christian character of this republic. 

Besides, dear sisters, I expected, 'while standing before you, to be so 
touched by the magic of your unmistakably American faces, earnest with 
love for our common country, that all narrow, provincial prejudices 
would drop away from me, and that instead I should be thrilled with a 
deep and abiding national enthusiasm; for to-day we should be prouder 
of being Americans than of having come from Massachusetts, or Cali- 
fornia, or New York, or Virginia, no matter how glorious its record. 

Moreover, I longed with unspeakable longing to take by the hanl 
those heroic Home Missionaries who I knew would be here, and to tell them 
that the story of their sacrifices, their privations, their patient endurance, 
and their zeal in preaching the unsearchable riches of the Gospel of the 
Lord Jesus Christ, has not fallen upon unsympathetic hearts. Dear 
Missionary sisters, you are welcome, nay, you are thrice welcome to this 
trysting-place of those who love the Lord and who are consecrated to the 
upbuilding of his kingdom in this nation. 

Let us congratulate one another, that in coming here, we have no reason 
to hang our heads in shame. The year has been a year of victory. That 
dreadful debt, which has been a horrible nightmare to the home Avorkers, 
to the cramped and discouraged veterans in the field, to the goaded 
Secretaries at the office, has been wiped out. Not a penny do we owe to 
bank or missionary. We stand free from the galling load which has been 
dragging us down for the last two years. It is fitting that we should 
break forth into joyful songs of praise for this signal deliverance. 

Let us also thank our Heavenly Father for the thousands who have 
been gathered into the fold; for the new churches which have been 
organized; for the little children who have been taught to lisp the name 
of Jesus; for the young men who have been snatched from the tempter's 
power; for the Christians who have been comforted and strengthened in 
the faith; for the broad acres and growing towns which have been pre- 
empted for the Master. 

But let us stay our rejoicing for a few moments to face squarely a few 






154 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July 

stern facts: 1st. The American. Home Missionary Society lias been working 
in the most limited manner possible. Retrenchment,, not Advance- 
ment has been its watchword. You know the sad story full well. It 
only remains for me to emphasize what has been said, alas! many, many, 
times. The trimming and pruning of the last two years, must be con- 
tinued no longer, else the work will lose its vigor, the home cburches 
will grow discouraged and listless, our missionaries will lose heart and 
enthusiasm, and mammonism and atheism will insolently triumph. 

2d. The tide of immigration, unprecedented in the world's history, 
has not ceased to roll in upon us. At least 1,000 foreigners land upon 
our shores, daily, to complicate the problem before the country. 
Although our success among the Bohemians and Scandinavians is wonder- 
ful, it is no time to fold our hands and sit at ease hoping that by some 
occult process the work will go on. Xo, it is the very time to bend our 
fullest energies to the task of Americanizing and Christianizing these 
people, who, through no fault of their own, have no fitness for governing 
themselves. 

Again, the Swett Exigency Fund has not been replaced. Some way 
must be devised to meet the summer's expenses. During July and 
August, the work goes on without cessation. A Home Missionary can- 
not often indulge in the luxury of a vacation at a fashionable watering- 
place, or a trip to Europe, or even a visit to home friends in the East. 
He toils away, assiduously, under the glare of the summer's sun, teach- 
ing, preaching, exhorting, only too thankful if the churches will make 
provision, so that his whole strength may be given to the labor of love. 
These three facts I lay before you with special emphasis. 

Now, a few words in regard to our own work. As I look over the 
Secretary's Report my heart swells with thankfulness and renewed 
courage. Nearly $38,000 for Home Missions this year! Have we ?eally 
been able to do so much? How blessed! Then we can do more. What 
additional labor shall we undertake another year? What more necessary 
and gracious work is open to us than that of securing a " Summer Fund" 
which will provide missionary salaries for the vacation months? It is said 
if the women of our churches will each put into the treasury fifty cents 
extra before setting out on the summer's pleasuring, the work would move 
on without special anxiety. Are there not among us those who will consti- 
tute themselves "Emergency Ladies," who will contribute this little sum, 
and who will influence their friends and neighbors to do the same — a 
much greater task? I throw this out only as a suggestion. 

.Many doors of usefulness are open to us. We are having the reward 
of the faithful servant, in the parable, "Thou has been faithful over a 
few things, I will make thee ruler over many things." Oh, that we 
might more perfectly understand our Savior's love for guilty, ruined, 
wretched humanity! Oh. that we might more fully catch his spirit of 
self-abnesfation and devotion to the salvation of men! When I think of 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 155 

the change which has been wrought in this sin-cursed world since He 
hung 14)011 the cross, I feel that nothing is Impossible to us. God grant 
that there may be a great outpouring of his Holy Spirit here this after- 
noon, to teach us our duty, and to give us strength to labor for our day 
and generation. 



OUR AEMQK. 
By Mrs. C. L. Goodell, St. Louis. 

WHAT [S OUR FURNISHING, OK AKMOR, AS OFFICERS OF THE WOMAN'S 
HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY? 

Wk read that Joshua commanded the officers of the Israelites as they 
stood on the borders of the promised land, saying: "Ye shall go before 
your brethren armed, and help them." Here is distinct recognition of the 
responsibility of leaders. We hold a commission from God to possess 
this land of America, as truly as the Israelites did to possess the land of 
Canaan: and we, too, as officers, must go before our brethren "armed." 

It is not a philanthropic enterprise, nor educational simply, but 
Christianizing, and our furnishing must come from the One who 
grants the commission. He lays upon us a great work, but He also gives 
us great power to do it. 

1. Our Savior said, "Ye shall be witnesses unto Me when ye shall 
receive power from the Holy Ghost." The great office of the Holy Spirit 
is to reveal Christ. His warm breath unseals our hearts to receive Christ; 
in His light we see Christ. He gently, but powerfully moves us to love 
him. and stirs within us the fountains of desire to serve him. This vision 
of our blessed Lord, then — the inner look at the crucified One — the ex- 
perience of a fire which touches the heart and lips, this is the power that 
conies from the Holy Spirit, and puts us in communication with the very 
throne of God. The prophet Micah said, " I am full of power, by the 
Spirit of the Lord." Paul had this power when he said, "Xecessity is 
laid upon me, yea, woe is unto me if I preach not the Gospel." Even 
Christ himself did not attempt to preach His own word without the 
anointing of the Holy Ghost. He says : "The Spirit of the Lord God is 
upon me: He hath anointed me to preach," etc. We also must have this 
spiritual anointing. 

2. Again, it is needful that we have some adequate conception and 
knowledge of the work to be done, and be able not only to work ourselves, 
but to direct others. Joshua said to the officers: "Command the people;" 
that is, tell them what to do — mark out a line of effort. In organized 
mission work there must be leaders ; the officers go before, the people 
follow. There are many who can do very well what they are told to do, 



156 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

but who look for direction ; who wait to be aroused and set to work. 
This the officers must be ready to do. 

3. Another important furnishing is, familiarity with God's Word, and 
the habit of drawing inspiration from it, both for ourselves and for those 
we try to lead. Here is a vast power within the reach of us all. If the 
Bible has something adapted to meet every condition and circumstance of 
our lives, we certainly shall not find it wanting when we look for wisdom 
and guidance in Christian work. The Gospel is the power of God unto 
salvation. 

We are in danger of drawing upon our own resources too much, and 
from the Bible too little ; to substitute human ingenuity for the wisdom 
that cometh from above. To be able to apply Scripture knowledge aptly 
to the case in hand, whatever department of Christian work it may be, is 
to wield a power that cannot be over-estimated. The Bible is a text-book 
for all it is necessary to know, in order to carry on, successfully, mission 
work ; and when we are casting about for wise ways and methods, we 
do well to make a prayerful study of its pages with reference to finding 
out God's mind. One of the diviue directions to Joshua was: "This 
book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth ; but thou shalt medi- 
tate therein day and night, that thou mayest observe to do all that is 
written therein, for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then 
thou shalt have good success." 

• 4. Another portion of our necessary armor is courage and hopefulness. 
This implies faith in God and his promises ; that we believe he will 
crown our efforts with success. We are not working alone. Our Lord's 
words are : " Be strong and of a good courage, for the Lord thy God is 
with thee." As co-workers with God, we have no right to be weak. 
The obstacles may be many, the laborers few, the perils that confront us 
appalling, and our progress slow ; yet we are to keep up good courage as 
those who rest in the Lord and trust his power to deliver and save, while 
we faithfully endeavor to help our brethren. 

A discouraged person can accomplish little or nothing. When we 
give way to discouragement we relax our efforts, and bring great dishonor 
upon God the faithful promiser. The Lord said to the Israelites : "Ye 
shall pass over this Jordan." That river separated them from the prom- 
ised land, and was a barrier that no human effort could overcome ; yet 
even that was not too hard for the Lord. So the rivers of Skepticism, of 
Mormonism, of Romanism, of Intemperance, and Socialism, which flood 
our country to-day, are under the divine control, and can all be rolled 
back at God's word as easily as the Jordan was parted to make a dry 
passage for the Israelites. This thought of God's almighty power that is 
pledged to us ought to make us strong. 

5. Again, we must have sympathy with one another, and with all en- 
gaged in kindred work. The moment we make others feel that we are 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 157 

in sympathy with Avhat they are trying to do, that moment we have great 
power over them to help them. If, on the other hand, because we may 
have had a little wider experience, we look on their beginnings with in- 
difference, and in our hearts despise the day of small things, we at once 
become powerless to aid or inspire them — we shall only quench the smok- 
ing flax. True Christian work draws hearts together. If we find any 
other effect being produced in us, we may well suspect the genuineness 
of our service ; we may fear we are building of wood, hay, or stubble, 
which will not bear the final test. 

As we look into each other's faces, and behold the blessed image of 
our Savior there, we love one another. We do not need to know much 
of each other in order to be Christian friends; our love in Jesus makes us 
one. And though we may live hundreds of miles apart, and move in 
widely varying circles, we come together as old friends. The fact that 
we have one Heavenly Father, one Savior, one Comforter, one Eternal 
Home to which we are going, is enough to kindle our sympathies and 
draw out our mutual love. 

6. One more important portion of our armor is prayer; — prayer for 
ourselves, for our fellow-workers, for the on-going of the kingdom of 
Christ in our land. Prayer is the sure thing that links us to God, and 
puts us into possession of all the resourc es of the heavenly world. Hear 
Paul's yearning words to the Ephesians: "T bow my knees unto the 
Father, that He would grant unto you, according to the riches of hi3 
glory, that ye may be strengthened with power through his Spirit; that 
Christ may dwell in your heart through faith, to the end that ye may be 
strong." 

It seems almost too good to believe, that we may actually hasten the 
coming of his kingdom by our prayers! That we may open the very 
treasures of heaven upon our missionary workers, and bring down the 
power of the Holy Spirit on their work. But it is tkue. May God 
grant us more and more the spirit of prayer! 

These are some of the furnishings for our missionary work. We 
might indeed quail before the mighty forces that rise up to threaten us, 
if we went forth to meet them unarmed. But with the " shield of faith," 
"the sword of the spirit, which is the Word of God," the breastplate of 
love, the helmet of hope, and the golden girdle of prayer, and above alL 
the Almighty Arm to lean upon, Ave may be strong for service, and 
become anointed and efficient leaders among our people. 

Our blessed Lord has gone up, and many of those who loved him, and 
labored for Him, are with Him. He has left some of us in the wilderness 
a little longer. It is one family, however, — some above and some below. 
They that are above have finished their work, and have entered into the 
rest of the people of God. We that are below, are left to be lights in the 
world, and to shine for Christ till He calls us Home. 

"Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life." 



158 Till: HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

A ROOKY MOUNTAIN WOMAN. 

Mrs. J. A. Pickett, of White Water, Colorado, gave some thrilling 
experiences of life in the Rocky Mountains, including a graphic account 
of her Sunday-school, nine miles from the ranch upon which she and her 
three boys have lived since that never-to-be-forgotten tragedy of the over- 
turned stage-coach, in which the little family were suddenly deprived of 
the husband and father, and the American Home Missionary Society of 
one of its beloved and most efficient superintendents. 

This Sunday-school, she said, brought to the people of this wild 
region memories of the old-time Sabbath-day of the early home, and they 
began to grow hungry for a preaching service. She found twelve Chris- 
tian people, and wrote to Superintendent Sanders begging him to come 
and organize them into a church. It was impossible for him to go to her 
at that time, but he gave her permission to organize it herself. This she 
did, at once! 

Mr. Sanders has sent a pastor to this little flock, whom they are doing 
their utmost to support. They worship in a little school-house, which is, 
however, soon to be closed to all church services. Mrs. Pickett empha- 
sized the need of a small chapel which should also include a reading- 
room for the cow-boys of that region. 

The audience were greatly interested in this story, and, when an 
impromptu collection was proposed, responded most heartily by contrib- 
uting over $450 to this woman's Rocky Mountain church. May every 
dollar of the remaining five hundred needed, be also contributed by 
Christian women! 

But this brave and earnest women heard the voice of the Master again, 
and yet again that day, saying unto her "Oh, woman, great is thy faith; 
be it unto thee even as thou wilt." At the close of the meeting, a lady 
from Gloversville,N. Y., said to her, "I own land in that country of 
which you have told us. You shall have an acre of my land for your 
chapel!" In the evening, a New Hampshire lady presented a communion 
service to Mrs. Pickett for the little church, and before the close of this 
eventful day, several barrels of literature had been promised for the 
" cow-boy's reading-room. " 

The scene will never be forgotten by one who saw this happy woman 
in her room that night, praising God, with streaming eyes, for his 
unspeakable goodness in bringing her to the East to receive so rich a bless- 
ing from his children. 

♦ 

EARLY RECOLLECTIONS OF MORMONISM IN SWEDEN. 
By Mrs. Botilda Persson Moore. 

Among the many bright memories that cluster about my early home- 
life, are two pictures, of the somberest colors, and the deepest shadows. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 159 

And. whenever my thoughts revert to those happy days, these pictures 
stand out, in bold relief, and challenge my attention. If you will go 
with me, for a \\>\v moments, I will show you these pictures. 

Having reached the little city of Cimbrishamn, on the southern coast 
of Sweden, where the waves of the Baltic, soothingly caress the shores, or 
break against the rocks, we will seek one of its homes. On entering it, 
we see then 1 every sign of refinement and culture. On being admitted to 
the family circle, we find that love, honor and purity govern that house- 
hold. It is what we would call a happy home, lido this home a stranger 
gains admittance, and even wins th.i confidence of the family; and wc 
need not wonder at it, for he appears like an angel of light; but, behind 
the mask of religion is disguised an emissary of the evil one, who con- 
centrates all his efforts and skill on the flower of the family, a young lady 
of twenty wars. She is very beautiful. Our poet, Tegner, would say 
of her, she was fair as a, " morgqn-rodnad,',' — which means "fair as the 
blush of dawn;" and this sly intruder does not cease to ply his wily arts 
till he has made her his victim. Never shall I forget the morning she 
rushed into our school-room to say " Good-by " to our teacher, exclaim- 
ing. " 1 am going to Utah! — I am going to Utah!" Never did she look 
more fair, in her innocence and joy, completely infatuated, as she was, 
with the new teachings of the stranger. And the parents, equally ignor- 
ant of the falseness of these teachings, felt it their duty to let their 
daughter go where such a glorious future awaited their child. Have you 
ever felt the loneliness, the heart-ache, the anxiety, when a child that 
has been the joy of your home, has left you? If you have, then you can 
sympathize with these parents. But to what shall we compare their 
sorrow, when this child, transplanted from that atmosphere of love, 
purity, and innocence, to one that is nauseating with the corruption of 
of the place, where there is no way of escape for her, in very desperation, 
becomes wholly abandoned, without self-respect, with no faith in either 
God or man, utterly hopeless, a ruined life, a lost soul, behind her a 
blighted home! I will leave that picture, with only this thought : What 
would you or I do, if such a one should happen to be our child? 

We will not look for the other picture in the city, but will betake 
ourselves to a sparsely-settled country district, and stop at a small cottage; 
it is a very small one, indeed, but, upon entering it, we see, at once, that 
the inmates are thrifty and cleanly. The family consists of an invalid 
mother and her two daughters. Karin, the older of the two, is now 
eighteen, the very picture of health, and goodness, and contentment. 
She is the right arm of that household, its main dependence. During 
the winter, she spins the flax for some neighbor; and during the summer, 
she weaves it into cloth, and takes an honest pride in both the quantity 
and the quality of her handiwork. The younger sister devotes herself to 
their invalid mother, and household duties, while that mother is priestess 
in the family; and I doubt, if you could find, in the most gospel-favored 



160 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

community with its prayer-meetings, its "Y. P. S. C. E.," its Sunday- 
school and Bible classes, a family of three more thoroughly settled in the 
doctrines of the Bible, more deeply grounded in the Christian faith, more 
obedient to the will of God, as they read his holy word. Their days are 
spent in quiet contentment and implicit confidence in God. Into this 
family also, a stranger intrudes, if not tbe same one that we saw in the 
city, a servant of the same master. This unsophisticated family feels 
itself honored, by being sought out, in their secluded home, by one of 
God's own chosen ones, as he sanctimoniously claims to be; and they 
listen eagerly to his teachings, which he confirms with many proof texts 
from the Bible. And when the fond mother seems to shrink from the 
thought of anyone leaving home, in order to serve God in a foreign land, 
then he brings to bear the familiar passage, "Every one that hath for- 
saken father or mother, for my name's sake shall receive an hundred fold, 
and inherit eternal life." Having aimed at, and overcome the mother's 
conscientious scruples, he has gained his point. It only remains, now, to 
entrap Karin, whom he has selected as his prey; and this is easily done, 
by holding before her such glowing prospects and fair promises as none 
but the father of lies can invent; and when he assures Karin that she 
will be able to support mother and sister much more easily, that she can 
soon send for them to come to her, that she is only going to prepare the 
way for them, he has captured his fair victim. The mother stills her 
heart's anguish with the thought of her child's welfare: "Karin has 
had to work so hard, to earn their bread ; now she will have an easier lot." 
And at last, with many promises and reassurances between mother and 
daughter, the last farewell is spoken, and Karin, brave, pure and true, is 
-on her way to Utah. 

Leaden-footed the days and nights pass by, in that lowly cottage. We 
■will not try to look in^o the mother's heart. At last comes the day when 
they expect a letter, but it does not come; mother and sister find ready 
■excuses for Karin; not a thought of blame for her enters their minds. 
The weeks merge into months, the months become many; but, even then, 
confidence in Karin is still unshaken as the hills about them. The 
Christmas-tide is approaching — that time so sacretl to the Swedes; surely 
Karin will remember them then, and the frail mother, whose strength has 
failed greatly, since her daughter's departure, summoning all her energy to 
quiet the tempestuous emotions of her heart, bravely awaits the Christmas- 
tide. The day arrives, but it brings no word from Karin. The strain is 
too great, the mother's heart breaks, and her spirit is set free. 

Now, let us see why Karin did not write to those who weie so dear to 
her. Arriving in Utah, she was exhibited, with a number of other 
women, and, being young and comely, she was, at once, selected by 
one of the leading saints, who had grown gray in iniquity and crime. 
On being informed that this vile, repulsive creature was to be her hus- 
band, she could not believe it possible; but when she was compelled to face 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 161 

the awful fact, she at first pleaded against it as for her life. This 
proving to be of no avail, she rebelled against and fought the monster; 
when they found that she would not yield herself a ready victim to their 
practices, they tried every persuasive art to win her over to their faith ; 
ami when they failed in that, then they resorted to cruel punishment 
and threats, but our noble Karin did not yield. At last, after two 
weeks of disappointment and despair, reason forsook her, and one morn- 
ing, she was observed casting herself into a lake, whose cold waves 
quickly shielded her from her tormentors. No doubt, the saints were 
glad that she bad taken herself out of the way, relieving them of fur- 
ther trouble with so incorrigible a person. No wonder that the mother 
waited, in vain, for news from Karin. 

Now, friends, do you ask, who these strangers were, that caused such 
a destruction of hopes, lives, and souls? 

'They were Mormon Missionaries, who could show you certificates to 
the fact, that they had permission to go wherever they chose and spread 
the pernicious influence of Mormonism, far and wide. I think I hear 
some one say: " But that happened so long ago, it is an old story." 

What I have told you, happened about eighteen years ago. It has 
happened every year since then; it happens to-day. 

A few days ago, I received two letters from Sweden. One friend 
writes: "Two Mormons came here, this winter, from Utah; a number of 
people had gathered in a house to listen to them; but the Mormons 
heard that the authorities from a neighboring city were in pursuit of 
them, and they did not think it best to meet their appointment, but 
fled to parts unknown." Another friend writes: "Thank God, the 
Mormons have not visited our place for many years. They do not 
now venture into the cities, but confine themselves to rural districts. 
May there soon be a stop to their work." A young Swedish woman 
told me, a short time ago, "The last words my mother said to me, when 
I left home, a year ago, were: "My child, beware of the Mormons." 
My friends, thousands of young women have received the same warn- 
ing, on leaving their homes for an untried future; and can we not 
fancy the fears and anxieties of that parent's heart who is constrained to 
utter such a warning ? 

The Swedes, as a class, are a very credulous and unsuspecting peo- 
ple, and it is well nigh impossible for them to believe that any one can 
trifle or deceive in matters of religion. Can we not therefore, picture 
to ourselves, the complete revulsion which takes place, when such a mind 
as this finds itself utterly deceived, utterly helpless, utterly friendless, 
in a strange land, surrounded by all that is vile and inhuman, by 
threats and tyranny ? Can we wonder that despair seizes the soul, — that 
reason is dethroned, — that the person gives himself over to crimes the 
most disgusting and brutal. 

Christian friends, we have a work to do, in shielding these our brothers 



K62 77/ A' HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

and sisters from this great curse. The story of misery and woe has come 
to us so often from Utah, our hearts are deeply moved for these deceive! 
and unhappy people and our indignation is aroused at the abominable 
practices of Mormonism. But we seldom, if ever, give a thought to the 
innocent victims, induced to go to Utah from other lands. 

You need but to read the results of recent investigations in Utah, by 
the Eev. M. W. Montgomery, to learn how wide-spread is this soul- 
destroying system. He states that two thousand converts annually come 
over the seas to Utah, and unless we stem this tide of immigration, it 
seems to me that the "New West Education Commission," and other 
missionary efforts in Utah, must fail to reach their highest results, and 
much labor is spent in vain. 

Faithful men and women labor diligently in this unenviable field, — 
the churches give liberally to carry on the good work, and still the United 
States government allows these Mormons to send as many missionaries 
as they please, all over the world ! That is policy, I suppose — it is not 
principle. Did we not know it to be a fact, Ave should be very slow co 
believe, that a nation like this, foremost among civilized lands, could 
suffer such a hideous blot on its fair escutcheon; and I cannot but feel 
that this government is responsible for the lives and souls that are 
decoyed through Mormon missionaries, and lost by their teachings — 
responsible, at least, for those who come from other lands; for these are 
ignorant of the facts in the case. So long as this government will not 
wipe out this iniquity from the face of this land, but permits the 
Mormons to go abroad, deceiving the people, it ought, at the same 
time, to send Christian teachers, to warn such as are in clanger of being 
ensnared. 

The Swedes have found a champion in the Eev. Mr. Montgomery, 
who is devoted to the good of this people, and whose powerful influence 
is felt beyond the Atlantic. A few years ago, he visited that glorious 
land, — there is none other like it, — in behalf of the churches and he 
caused such a wave of religious interest to roll over that land that it has 
not subsided, yet. Now send him over, once more — he will be welcome, I 
assure you — and let him sound the tocsin of war against Mormonism. His 
article, " A Warning to the Swedes," in which he unflinchingly exposes 
Mormonism, has been translated into the Scandinavian languages, and is 
to be printed in every Scandinavian newspaper on the globe, and thereby 
is to enlighten thousands. After a Swedish woman had read that article, 
she said to me, " Why does not some one go over and tell them how 
bad it is, and I am sure no one would listen to the Mormons." 

There is but one opinion in regard to Mormonism and its influence. 
It is an evil system, and its influence is pernicious, yet we often hear this 
remonstrance among Christian men: "The time is not yet come to 
destroy the hydra-headed monster, the public is not yet ready to abolish 
it." But when is it a proper time to destroy the works of darkness ? 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 1G3 

When ought the public to be ready to abolish an atrocious sin like this ? 
Is it not now 9 

Dear Bisters, if this government, if statesmen and politicians will 
will not grapple with this monster, then let, us come to the rescue of our 
fellow men in other lands, whose affections and hopes and aspirations 
for their children are like our own. And were our sons and 
daughters in danger, I am sure our tongues would be eloquent, and our 
brains and hearts fertile in inventing means and methods by which this 
horrid iniquity should be stamped out. Lei us so mold public senti- 
ment by arousing the public conscience that SHAME shall stand written 
on the face of every man who has the pow&r but not the will to remove 
this curse from our land, and insure peace and happiness to thousands of 
homes. The mercy seat, and the judgment throne are as accessible to 
these deluded victims of oppression as they are to us. And there they 
will plead their own cause, there they will be avenged. Unless we share 
in the work of saving them, we can never share in the blessings that fol- 
low such a work. 

♦ ' — ■ 

HAVE SALT IN YOURSELVES. 

TO YOUNG. LADIES. 
By Axxis F. Eastman. 

"Have you a message for the young women of this Land — for those 
who are not only the light of our homes, but the hope of our Nation?" 

A message? Yes, a hundred messages. From every failure on our 
track as we trace it back through the years, — from the conscious weak- 
ness of the present hour which might have been strength, from defeat 
and disappointment, we eagerly gather up the secrets we have learned 
and pour them out upon those who stand " Where the brook and river 
meet, womanhood and childhood fleet." 

We see that it is a wonderful place to stand — we know what the brook 
has been, with its freshness and its song hidden in the quiet walks of 
home, and we know what the river ought to mean, how it should bring 
cleansing and refreshment and peace to the larger world outside, and we 
love to think that perhaps we may have made some of your mistakes for 
you, and that out of our past you may get a future. We see that the 
river of womanhood to-day. is not what it was a thousand, nor one hun- 
dred years, nor even fifty years ago. It can no longer flow only in shel- 
tered places among the shadows of the home trees, it must pass out into 
the world's dusty highways, it must help do the world's work — it must 
carry its crystal waters and its song of peace into the crowded mart and 
the busy highway. It is no longer enough for women to suffer in silence, 
to cry to Him who seeth in secret, for the sins and sorrows of their 
native land and the world, — the .call for action has been heard and 
women have arisen to obey it. 

Is it that womanhood is changed? No, the world is waking to the 



164 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

value of the woman's weapons — and so we have vast armies organized, 
with no beating of drums or clang of arms. Their weapons are Faith 
and Prayer, and the banner over them is Love. They have wielded 
them long in secret and they know their power. See them joining 
their feeble hands across this great continent from Maine to California 
to keep back the tide of intemperance which threatens to ingulf our fair 
land and silence the voices of our children. See them stretching out 
their hands to their sisters lying in dungeons centuries old in far-away 
heathen lands. Will they be able to lift them up? Yes, for " love 
never fails." See them as they gather here to-day, claiming America, 
not for Americans, as the politicians say, but for Christ, and thus Christ 
for the world. 

He who cares to look back over the history of the past ten years will 
be struck by the increase of the organized public work of women in all 
reformatory and evangelistic work. This phenomenon is surely one of 
the important factors in the development of American Christian civiliza- 
tion. And here you are in the midst of it. You can not escape it if you 
would — you cannot be the perhaps-to-be-envied woman, who is to 
keep silence in public and learn of her husband at home; and who, if he 
knows little and cares less about all these things, is relieved from' 
further responsibility in the matter. You are a nineteenth — nearly 
a twentieth century girl, and new times bring new duties. You cannot 
escape the womanly ideal of the latter part of the nineteenth century. 

Moreover, beloved, I should be untrue to my trust did I not confess 
to you that the old-fashioned duties of womanhood do not grow less. 
Women are working at many knotty problems to-day, but none is harder 
than that old one on which nearly every one of the Old Testament wor- 
thies failed — bringing up a child successfully according to his bent. It 
is an arduous calling, this of being a woman, one which should not 
be embraced lightly. In such a moment as this, in view of 
all the interests represented here, in view of the world's best 
work, which has its source and center in the hearts and brains of the 
women before me, and remembering always that home must be first and 
chiefest to every woman whom God has made a queen in her own right, 
by making her a mother — in view of all this, what can we say to you to 
make you large enough, strong enough, good enough for your oppor- 
tunity ? Nay, let us stand aside and let the Master of Life speak to you. 
This is his message: " Have salt in yourselves." You will remember 
that he spoke these words to the disciples at the time when John came 
running to him to tell him of his zeal in forbidding one who was casting 
out devils in the Master's name because he was not doing it in the ortho- 
dox manner, as John thought. I need not point out to you the grandeur 
of Jesus' reply, in which he proves himself so far removed from the im- 
perfections of our human nature. But in his talk with the disciples 
after this occurrence, he speaks these words. They meant more to those 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 165 

Jews who heard him than they can to us at first. They referred to the 
old law concerning sacrifices, so familiar to every Jew, which was this : — 
"Neither shalt thou suffer the salt of the covenant of thy God to be 
lacking from thy meat-offering — with all thine offerings thou shalt offer 
salt." Lev. ii. 13. So essential was this deemed, that the rite was often 
spoken of as the covenant of salt. It was never called a covenant of 
meat, though that was, in truth, so much larger a part of the offering. 
The salt was that which God insisted upon and which gave its spiritual 
savor to the offering. I do not know what this can typify, if it be not 
the spiritual part of the worship, or gift, or service. It is that nameless 
something which gives its spiritual savor to every real gift or true deed of 
service, or genuine act of worship. Have you ever received a gift that 
you knew was given you simply by way of payment? Then you have a 
hint of what an unsalted sacrifice is. Have you ever gone through daily 
tusks just because you had to, with no uplift or aspiration or hope? Then 
you know something about offering unsalted sacrifices. 

Can we not say, out of our own daily experience in giving and serv- 
ing, obeying and worshiping, "Salt is indeed good?" That spiritual 
essence — so volatile and so quick to escape — which yet gives all the sweet 
and high and holy meaning to our lives in all their relationships — surely 
it is good, indispensable. 

Life in all its relations would be flat, stale, unprofitable indeed with- 
out it. And yet we are often without it — and most of all we lack it in 
the offerings which we bring to God and humanity. And so, for lack of 
salt life grows dull and tiresome — tasks are long and hard — we go like 
slaves to our work, because we must, and we fail to offer any acceptable 
service to God or to work any real good to our fellow men. 

Why does it fail ? Simply because we do not have salt in ourselves. We 
are always trying to get it from some outside circumstances or from each 
other. From the time we rise from our beds in the morning and 
look eagerly out of our windows to see if it is bracing, inspiring weather, 
our kind of weather — until we go back to our beds at night despairing of 
all God's plans in the world, we are like the ''horse leech's daughter" — 
though I never could find out what that was — crying "give, give!" 
We ask the weather to tone us up and make us ready for brave work; 
we ask our family for cheer and encouragement; we demand faithfulness 
and skill from our servants; if our companion gives us a moan or a strong 
pull in the wrong direction we roll the failure of the day right over on 
her shoulders, and when we leave our homes we demand inspiration from 
our teachers, and most of all from the preacher, and if we feel no glow of 
spiritual life we mourn over the degeneracy of the modern pulpit. If 
we have no missionary zeal we say : " Ours is not a missionary church. " 
We know that our religion is a form, and that our gifts are made because 
we are ashamed to withhold them — in a word, that our Christianity lacks 



1 6 6 THE II OME MI SSI OX. 1 11 ) '. July, 

salt, and is therefore good for nothing; but the failure is in the jdace 
where we are set and the people among whom we must dwell. 

The wide-spread dependence upon this outside seasoning of life is 
seen in the constant effort that is made to manufacture the salt of life in 
large quantities. Every missionary society spends much of its time, 
strength ami means in getting up the great meeting and bringing some 
noted speaker before its members, that he may inspire them anew with 
love to God and humanity, so that they may be willing to serve them and 
Him in sacrificial gifts. 

" We who are older need not be told that such salt soon loses its savor; 
while you are surrounded by people who have this salt and by influences 
that are full of it, you may be deceived into thinking that you axe 
living a suecessfnl and worshipful life, and offering a true sacrifice to 
God; but a few days of sickness or isolation, or a few days spent among 
people who are themselves without 'this salt of life, will prove to you that 
Jesus gave to his disciples the only sure receipt for the seasoning of our 
daily life; the only one which can make it in its work or in its worship, 
acceptable to God. You must have salt in yourselves. Start out to-mor- 
row with a resolution to be good — to be a bringer of cheer wherever your 
influence goes. Perhaps you meet at the threshold of your room one 
who stabs you with a polite yet cruel tongue. Immediately your day is 
darkened, your inspiration breathes itself quickly away, and ) 7 ou drop to 
the old level of yesterday, a bearer of burdens indeed, but not a bringer of 
cheer. Be sure, then, that you are seeking your salt outside — that you did 
not have it truly, as you ought, in yourself. But how? How can you 
cease to be a beggar in the world and become an almoner? Take Christ into 
yourself. He is the true and only savor of life. His spirit in its, alone 
makes acceptable our prayers, and our alms. Neither shalt thou suffer 
the salt of the covenant of thy God to be lacking from thy service; be it 
work or waiting, with all thine offerings thou shalt offer salt. It is our 
hunger and thirst for this true savor of life, that makes us go about beg- 
ging from nature, from books, and from men, that which shall make liv- 
ing and laboring worth the while. Emerson has voiced this truth in 
these words: "All young persons thirst for a real existence, for an 
object, for something great and good, which they shall do with all their 
heart." This is only another way of saying that nothing can satisfy us 
but the Best and the Highest. Until we behold him who is chiefest 
among ten thousand, the One altogether lovely, we shall be beggars in this 
world indeed. The only thing which you can ever do with "all your 
heart is to serve and love and follow Jesus Christ, for He is the only one 
who is worthy of our best and highest." 

They tell me that the young women are asked this year, to give their 
help to the work for the Scandinavians in this country. How shall we 
salt this sacrifice for you so that you shall offer it with joy ? Shall we 
take you back in thought up the stream of time till we see those glorious 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 167 

old Vikings issuing out of the deep and gloomy fiords of their frozen land 
in their swift ships to seize and subdue the fair lands of the South? 
Shall we surround these new comers on our shores with all the halo of 
romance and song which Ave can so easily find in the story of their ances 
tors ? Or shall we picture them to you as they arc to-day, a hardy, brave, 
honest and affectionate people, so well fitted to offset. the lazy and vic- 
ious races that have come. to us from popish lands? Shall we tell you of 
their eagerness for education, heroic self-denial, and ready adaptation to 
to our American ideas, of their fitness to become warp and woof, with 
our own children, of our national fabric ? 

"Would this fire your hearts with zeal for their salvation? In the 
strength of this will yon deny yourself something of the pride of life and 
the desire of your eyes? Perhaps, for a time. But we will not appeal to 
you thus. "We will let these multitiides pass by — old men and children, 
young men and maidens, and we will not seek to-voice their need. Then 
let us wait in silence until we hear one voice speaking in your ear, — 
"Behold I stand at the door and knock" — and when you have opened 
your door, and he has supped with you, and you with him, you will bring 
all your treasures and lay them at his feet, and you will arise in his name 
and for his sake, to render joyful service to the least of these his 
brethren. Take Christ into yourself and you will need no man to 
teach you the meaning of Life — nor to paint for you the glory of the 
service for humanity. 



GLEANINGS. 



Mks. J. A. Biddle, of Hartford, Connecticut, who presided so 
acceptably at the meeting of the Woman's Department on Wednesday 
afternoon, is the author of the leaflet "Helen Harrison's Awakening." 
The demand for this paper, which was read at the annual meeting of the 
New York Woman's Union, one year ago, has resulted in the circulation 
of several thousand copies throughout the country. 



The addresses of Rev. Messrs. E. A. Adams, Moritz E. Eversz, 
J. Lewis, and W. G. Puddefoot, all of rare interest, will be published in 
the August number of TJie Home Missionary. 

The uplifting power of sacred song through the medium of a voice of 
exceptional sweetness, was never more evident than at each session of 
this convention. Our souls were stirred — not only with the melody of 
the clear tones — but with the tender spirituality of Christian senti- 
ment, rendered with rare expression and distinctness. The breathless 
stillness of the audience explains, perhaps, the strange hush which falls 
upon crowds of rough men and women in New York City at a " Jerry 



168 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

McAuley Meeting," or the "Midnight Mission," when the same sweet 
voice gives to them the glad tidings of free salvation, in songs to which 
many a wanderer listens with bowed head, and tear-stained face. 



A season of silent prayer was closed by Mrs. G-oodell, with the fol- 
lowing from 1 Kings, 8: 39: "Then hear thou in heaven thy dwelling 
place, and forgive, and do, and give to every man according to his ways, 
whose heart thou knowest; for thou, even thou only knowest the hearts 
of all the children of men." 



Many of the audience were impressed by the choice English in which 
the Swedish lady, Mrs. Moore, told the story of her "Early Recollections 
of the Mormons in Sweden." Mrs. Moore has just completed the trans- 
lation of " Ben Hur" into the Swedish language. 



The face of that veteran missionary, and mother of missionaries, 
Mrs. Schaumer, — touched with a ray of the glory to come, — was an inspi- 
ration to all. She sat upon the platform and entered with keen zest into 
every part of the programme. When asked to rise for presentation to 
the audience, she consented; but when her age was announced as eighty- 
seven, she exclaimed, "No! .No! only eighty-six!" Her earnest words in 
behalf of the Bohemians, and the Spanish population of New York City, 
with a fervent prayer for all missionary workers, will not soon be for- 
gotten. The next day, willing to advance the cause of Christ by every means 
within her power, Mrs. Schauffler consented to climb to the gallery of 
a photographer, and sit for her picture! This, to help the Spanish work. 
The effort was successful, and the photograph, cabinet size, may be 
obtained for fifty cents, by application to Miss C. M. Strong, 127 E. 10th 
St., New York City. While Rev. Mr. Jones, of Saratoga, was assisting 
this remarkable woman to descend the stairs, she remarked, "Now, 
if I should fall, and lose my life, how much faster these pictures would 
sell!" It is needless to add that a large number of these valuable photo- 
graphs were disposed of at once. 

A very pleasant and unexpected part of the programme was the 
following message from Mrs. Drake, of Dakota. 

"Dear Sisters, Greeting! Sorry I cannot be with you. Must stay by 
the stuff. Oh, woman, great is your privilege. Send us help to hold our 
country for Christ. New fields are opening. If you cannot come to the 
front, send those who can. The Master calls you to do this for his sake." 



Although there has been no falling off in the number of boxes sent 
to home missionary pastors during the past year, the "Woman's Fund 
for Missionary Salaries" has already reached the sum of $5,552.93. 
This Fund, which helps to keep the men upon the field, is a source of 
strength and encouragement to the Society. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 169 

The young ladies of this land have been invited by the American 
Home Missionary Society to raise $10,000 this year for work among the 
Scandinavians. Who will open the "Young Ladies' Swedish Fund?" 
You n* 1 " gentlemen, will, we doubt not, be permitted to "lend a hand" 
at filling this special purse. 

At the close of the woman's meeting, a lady came to the secretary of 
the Woman's Department, and placing within her hand a plain gold 
ring said, " I want to give you this ring to sell for the blessed cause. I 
want you to get a good large sum for it. You will not mind my name 
being engraved upon it — will you?" 

The heart of the secretary sank within her as the array of finger-rings, 
ear-rings, breast-pins, pencil-cases, necklaces, eye-glasses, etc., in her 
office at the New York Bible House came to mind. Could she wound 
this dear, waiting disciple, whose heart had been stirred to help the cause 
in this way? Had she the courage to refuse the ring? Looking into 
the honest, patient face, she resolved to — confess! She admitted the 
sad fact that after two years of effort, she had thus far failed to sell even 
one ornament of this golden collection committed to her care by expec- 
tant donors. The blank disappointment which met this declaration 
led to a suggestion. " I will take your gift, if you desire it; — but why not 
sell it yourself to some one who knows you, and who might pay you 
liberally if your wish to help the cause were known?" She saw" the point 
at once, took back the ring, and will, we believe, be blessed in her effort 
to add a gift in Money to the Lord's treasury. 



It added not a little to our zeal and courage to receive the good 
news that our ranks are strengthened by two new State organizations: 
Indiana and Southern California. 

Indiana. — President, Mrs. C. H. Eogers, Michigan City; Vice 
Presidents, Mrs. C. S. Warbarton, Indianapolis, and Mrs. C. J. Bigelow, 
Elkhart; Executive Committee, Mrs. Jennie Whitehead, Indianapolis, 
and Mrs. G. B. Safford, Elkhart; Secretary, Mrs. W. E. Mossman, 
Fort Wayne; Treasurer, Mrs. L. F. Perdue, Terre Haute. Mrs. A. K. 
Wray, Kokomo, was appointed delegate to the Saratoga Convention. 

Southern California. — Rev. Dr. Warren, of San Francisco, says 
that this Woman's Union starts off well. The society is bound to have 
money, for Mrs. E. Cash, Los Angeles, is President. It is bent on suc- 
cess, for Mrs. H. K. W. Bent, Pasadena, is Secretary. The money will 
be well kept, as the Treasurer is Mrs. Banks, Los Angeles. Further 
particulars concerning this Union will be given in a later number. 

An all-day meeting of the officers and delegates of the Woman's State 
Organizations, arranged and conducted by Mrs. C. H. Taintor, of 
Chicago, was held on Tuesday. The programme was packed with good 



170 77/ A' HOME MISSIONARY. July., 

things. The papers read, and the discussions which followed, were of 
great practical benefit to all. The story of this delightful day will be 
published, that seekers after helpful suggestions may have the inspiring 
record. Those who wish to secure this pamphlet may apply to the sec- 
retaries of the State Organizations, or to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, 34 Bible 
House, New York City. 



From a Springfield, (Mass.), AYoman: As I could not attend the 
Annual meeting of the Home Missionary Society at Saratoga, I will put 
the amount which I should have paid for my expenses into the collection 
for your Society next Sunday. 

If it is the wish of any lady who contributed to Mrs. Pickett's work, 
at the Saratoga Meeting, that the contribution be placed to the credit of 
the Woman's Home Missionary Organization of her State, let her so 
notify Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, New York City. 



It is a good suggestion, that hereafter the second Sabbath of June be 
observed by all Congregational Churches as a National Home Mission- 
ary Day. 



As we go to press the good news comes that Vermont has joined the 
ranks of "Organized States for Home Missionary Work. Next month 
"The Vermont Woman's Home Missionary Union" will appear on our 
list. Mrs. A. B. Swift, Burlington, President; Mrs. Osgood, Montpelier, 
Secretary; and Mrs. Wm. P. Fairbanks, St. Johnsbury, Treasurer. 



Intense interest was manifested by the enthusiasm shared alike by 
those who have spoken and those wh© have listened, by those who have 
worked in the field and those who have labored at home, by those who 
have come fresh and eager from the far West, bringing the inspiration 
of their service and their sacrifice with them, and by those who have 
come to light the torches of their zeal at these fires of faith. — The Chris- 
tian Union. 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



171 



£Vjjp ointments in Dftag, 1888. 



Not in commission last year. 

Bidwell, John r>.. Arlington, Neb. 

Brown, Willard £>., [nterlachen, Fla. 

Burgess, Edmund J., White Cloud, Mich. 

I)c I'liy, Wellington, I In pU ins, Hopkins Station, 
and Brantley, Mich. 

Palk, P. J., Hastings, Neb. 

Harris, Beni., Broslburg, Ocean Mines and Alle- 
gany, Sid. 

Henry, Alex. J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hunt, O. N., Athens, Sherwood and Lconidas, 
Mich. 

Hurlbnt, John E., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Lee, Joseph, Wakonda, So, Dak, 

Loba, Victor E., Siloam Springs, Ark. 

oilman, Henry A.., Salamanca, N. V. 

Pease, William 1',, Rising City, Neb. 

Seaver, Charles 11., Junction City, Kan. 

Striemer, Alexander, Aitkin, Minn. 

Trover, Winlield 1)., I'.lall, Kan. 

Wood, Samuel, Garden Oily, Kan. 

Jie-commissio?ied. 

Ashman, Edward H., Denver, Colo. 

Barber', Loman N., Turloek, Dallis and Hills 

Ferry, Cal. 
Bente, Christopher H., Fast Roekaway, N. Y. 
Bingham, Charles M., Daytona and Port Orange, 

Brown, Henry C, Springfield, Mo. 

Brnnker, James, Hush Center, Kan. 

Campbell, James, Fall City and out-stations, Cal. 

Carrutheis, William, Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

Clatlin, George P., Dunlnp, Kan. 

Clarke, Almon T., Tavares, Fla. 

Coffman, Arthur W., Denver, Colo. 

Crane, Henry C, Omaha, Neb. 

Crawford, Albert R., Lewis and Wadhams Mills, 
N. Y. 

Crawford, Andrew K., West Point and out-sta- 
tions, Cal. 

Crewman, Abraham K., Wahoo, Neb. 

Curham, James A., Mecosta and Mill Brook, 
Mich. 

Curtis, Ethan, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Daley, Charles M., Willow Lake and out-stations, 
So. Dak. 

Davison, Joseph B., Ashtabula, Ohio. 

Dean, Samuel C, South Bend, Neb. 

Dinsmore, Edward F., Little Shasta, Central Sis- 
kiyou and out -stations, Cal. 

Edwards, Jonathan, Spokane Falls and Half 
Moon, Wash. Ter. 

Fisher, William B., Louisville and Mt. Union, 
Kan. 

Fisk, Perrin B., Altamonte, Lake Brantley and 
Altamonte Springs, Fla. 

Foster, Festus, Wichita, Kan. 

Garver, Leonard J., Olvmpia, Wash. Ter. 

Gross, Alfred, Doaksvi'lle, Ind. Ter. 

Hines, Henry H., Hopkins, Ind. Ter. 

Huestis, Chas. H., Berlrand, Neb. 



Hughes, Isaac C, Ironton, Ohio. 

Hughson, Simeon S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Humphreys, John P., Remsen, \. V. 

Johnston, John B.j St. Louis, Mo. 

Jones, D. Sebastian, Lucas and Washington, 

Ohio. 
Kerr, Robert, Wakefield, Kan. 
Lange, John G., Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Lewis, Thomas ( i., Neel, Neb." 
Macdonald, John, Hydesville and Kohnerville, 

Cal.. 
McConaughy, Frank, North Yakima, Atahnam 

and out-stations, Wash. Ter. 
McCraken, William, Sharpsburg, I'enn. 
Milligan, John A., Omaha, Neb. 
Morse, Milton J., Carbondale and Ridgeway, 

Kan. 
Nichols, Danforth B., La Grange Township, East 

Dakota River and Utica, So, Dak. 
Norris, Thos. !•'., North Lawrence^ Barker's Union 

and Kauwaka, Kan. 
Osborn, Russell S., Ash Rock, New Harmony and 

Mt. Ayr, Kan. 
Pearson, Thos. J , Strong City, Kan. 
Peck, B. I)., Madison, N. Y. 
Philbrook, Chas. E., Sierra Valley, Sierraville, 

West Side, Beckwith and Hot Springs, Cal. 
Pound, Edward II., Hermosa and Lower Battle 

Valley, So. Dak. 
Reuth, Jacob, La Grange, Mo. 
Rogers, William, San Juan, Cal. 
Rose, William F., Port Gamble and Port Ludlow, 

Wash. Ter. 
Schnacke, Leon C, Clay Center, Kan. 
Scoville, Edgar E., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Shannon, William H., Maple Rapids and East 

Fulton, Mich. 
Shaw, George W., Ashton and Athol, So. Dak. 
Sims, Thomas, Oriska, No. Dak. 
Skinner, Edward, Osborne, Kan. 
Smedley, Merlin T., Jennings, La. 
Smith, L. Adams, Bird Citv, Celia and McNay's, 

Kan. 
Stafford, Burnett T., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Stickney, Edwin II., Harwood, Bethel and Cale- 
donia, No. Dak. 
Stokes, William T., Watertown, N. Y. 
Stone, Rollin S., Chatham, N. J. 
Stubbins, William H., Frankfort and out-stations, 

So. Dak. 
Swab, E. Frank, St. Louis, Mo. 
Taylor, Raynsford, Green Valley and out-etations, 

Cal 
Thing, Milo J. P., Omaha, Neb. 
Thomas, Richard H., Gait, Cal. 
Tubb, William H., Byron, Bethany and Marsh 

Creek, Cal. 
Uzzell, Thomas A., Denver, Colo. 
Vrooman, Frank B., Sycamore, Kan. 
Webber, Edwin E., Mantorville, Minn. 
Whitby, Henry J., Pittston, Penn. ' 
Whitman, John S., Canfield, Ohio. 
Woolman, William, Farnam, Neb. 
Worden, Sylvanus A., Stockholm Depot, N. Y. 



h 



Qcttipts in ©Xitvi, 1888. 



MAINE— $167.50. 

Bath, Central Ch., by F. S. Partridge. $50 00 
Skowegan, Ladies' Miss. Soc., Cong. 

Ch.,bvMrs J. A. Colby 15 50 

South West Harbor, Mrs. II. C. Sur- 
vey, $1; Mrs. P. Clark, 50c.; Mrs. P. 
Ross, 50c; by J. L. Crosby, Treas. 
Maine Miss. Soc _ 2 00 



Woodfords, by J. H. Clark 50 00 

Yarmouth, A. H. Burbauk, M. D 50 00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $159.00. 

Exeter, a member of the First Ch 10 00 

Hamrjstead, Miss A. M. Howard 5 00 

Keene, N. E. S 10 00 

Littleton, First Ch., special coll., by 

A. J.Church 5 75 



172 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



July, 



Milford, First, by A. E. Crosby, to 

const. C. S. Emerson, a L. M 83 25 

Mr. and Mrs. Lovel Harris 10 00 

Pelham, Mrs. E. W. Tyler, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian Fund 10 00 

West Lebanon, Cong. Ch., A Lady 
Friend, by H. French 25 00 

VERMONT— 8144.80. 

Burlington, First, A Friend 8 00 

Castleton, A Friend, for Bohemian 

Work, by Rev. G. P. Byington 2 00 

Ferrisburgh, Mrs. L. Carpenter 3 80 

Middlebury, E. J. Mathews... 100 

Rutland, by F. W. Gary, to const. D. 

Morgan and H. S. Parker, L. Ms.... 100 00 

Salisbury, by D. B. Kingsley 15 00 

West Randolph, by Rev. V. M. Hardy 13 00 

Williamstown, C. C. B 2 00 

MASSACHUSETTS— $4,171.74; of which 
Legacies, $1,922 02. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas.: 

By request of Donors $130 00 

Amherst, Mrs. R. A. Lester, by Prof. 

W. S. Tyler 100 00 

Andover, A. Friend, by E. Taylor 10 00 

Belchertown, J. L. Montague 10 00 

Cong. S. S., by G. H. Bunce 15 00 

Blandford, Legacy of Reuben Boise, 
by Rebecca L. Boise, Ex'x, to const. 
Elizabeth G. and Rebecca D. Boise, 

L. Ms 100 00 

Boston, Woman's H. M. Assoc, by 
Mrs. Sarah K. Burgess, Treas., for 

Salary Fund 300 55 

Mrs. Stevens' "Missouri PeetFund," 1 00 

Brockton, Mrs. E. F.Gardner 5 00 

Dorchester, Mrs. Walter Baker, by 

Miss Elizabeth Tolman 50 00 

East Hampton, Ladies' Benev. Soc, 

Payson Ch., by Miss L. A. Terry, to 

const. Mrs. Fanny R. Hamlin a L. M. 50 00 

Foxboro, Remainder of Legacy of 

Mrs. Susan Payson, by T. B. Bourne, 

Ex 722 02 

Granby, The Widow's Mite 1 40 

Hatfield, F. D. H 10 00 

Long Meadow, A Friend 3 00 

Monson,Young Ladies' Working Club, 

Cong. Ch., by Mrs. F. E. Morris 25 00 

Newbury, Legacy of Mrs. Abigail P. 

Dole, by G. H. Plumer, Ex... 400 00 

Legacy of Ruth D. Plumer, by G. H. 

Plumer, Ex. 400 00 

Northampton, Florence Cong. S. S. 

Class No. 18, by J. Phelps 10 00 

Plttsfield, First Cong. S. S., by A. A. 

Mills, for Salary Fund 25 58 

Qnincy, J. H. Wheble 1 00 

Rehoboth, by F. A. Bliss, in full, to 

const. G. W. Bliss a L. M 15 00 

Sharon, Ready Workers Mission 
Band, special, by Miss Abbie C. Bil- 
lings 13 00 

Sheffield, by Mrs. M. E. Cowles 8 10 

Wakefield, Mrs. C. E. McKay, special, 10 00 
Ware, "The Little Sunbeams," by 
Miss F. E. Sturtevant, for the Chil- 
dren's Bohemian Fund 25 00 

Webster, First, by E. L. Spalding 100 00 

Friends 5 40 

Wellesley, Mrs. C. L .Williamson, for 

work in North Wisconsin 10 00 

Westborough, A Friend 5 00 

Whitinsville, by E. Whitin 1,310 69 

Wilmington, On account of Legacy of 
Rev. Asa B. Smith, by Rev. E. Har- 
mon, Ex 300 00 

RHODE ISLAND— $1,252.76. 

Bristol, First Ch., by P. Skinner, Jr.. 53 20 
Kingston, by B. E. Helme 54 03 



Newport, A Friend 10 00 

Providence, Beneficent Ch., by E. 
Barrows, Treas. R. I. H. M. Soc 135 53 

Woonsocket, Globe Ch., A Friend, by 

Rev. E. S. Gould 1,000 00 

Globe Ch., special, $400;— 
[Erroneously acknowledged in June.] 

CONNECTICUT— $1,678.03; of which 
Legacies, $200.00. 

Received by Mrs. S. M. 
Hotchkiss, Treas. Woman's 
H. M. Union : 
Fairfield, Ladies of Cong. Ch., 

for Bohemian Work $19 68 

Griswold, Ladies' Aux., First 
Ch., by Mrs. Edward Geer, 

special 24 00 

Hartford, First Ch., Ladies' 

Home Miss. Soc, for Salary 

Fund, by Miss Emma Bunce. 72 00 

First Ch.,Aux. Ladies' H. 

M. Soc, by Miss Emma 

Bunce, for Salary Fund... 49 00 

First Ch., Parsonage Circle 

for Salary Fund, $35; for 

Bohemian Work, $20 55 00 

Miss Louisa Root, special.. 15 00 
Pearl St. Aux. by Mrs. G. C. 

Segur, for Salary Fund... 3 00 
Ladies' Aux. South Ch.,for 

Salary Fund 50.00 

$287 68 

Ansonia, Mrs. A B. Downs 2 00 

Bloomfield, Y.P.S.C.E., by Rev. E. F. 

Atwood 2 25 

Bristol, A Friend 75 00 

Canterbury, Rev. £. C. Haynes 5 00 

Center Brook, Mrs. E. E. Kelsey 1 40 

Connecticut, A Friend 80 00 

Guilford, First Ch., by E. W. Leete, to 

const. W. H. Leea L. M 50 00 

Groton, by Rev. A. J. McLeod 42 75 

Hampton, A Friend. 5 00 

Hartford, Asylum Hill Ch., of which 
$25 from Eliza T. Smith, for Debt, 

by C. E. Thompson 80 00 

Huntington, The Widow's Mite, by 

Rev. A. J. Park 2 00 

Madison, First Ch., by B. T. Dudley.. 10 00 

Add'l, byB. T. Dudley 100 

Manchester, North Ch., A Friend, by 

Rev. C. H. Barber 10 00 

Middletown, Bethany Chapel S. S., for 
Children's Bohemian Fund, by O. 

H. Wells 4 24 

Millbrook, by J. M. Grant 10 00 

Milford, First, by N. D. Piatt 250 00 

New Haven, Ch. of the Redeemer, 

add'l, by J. P. Baldwin 100 00 

Legacy of Miss Eliza Betts, by J. 

Church, Adm 100 00 

New London, from the Trust Estate 

of Henry P. Haven, by H. R. Bond. 250 00 
Norwalk, First Ch. in part, by E. C. 

Bissell.... 90 00 

Norwich, Legacy of Eliza F. Fox, by 

C. P. Cogswell, Ex 100 00 

Plymouth, J. M. Ward well 10 00 

Thompsonville, Mrs. A. T. Allen 4 40 

Unionville, First Ch. of Christ, by G. 

Dunham 25 51 

Waterbury, M. A. Brooks 50 00 

Woodstock, First, by H. T. Child.... 29 80 

NEW YORK-$l ,362.22. 

Received by Rev. C. C. Cree- 
gan: 

Black River and St. Law- 
rence Assoc $51 75 

Morrisville 7 82 

Utica, Plymouth Ch 51 20 



110 77 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



173 



Received by Ra v. A. G. Upton: 
Black Hiver and St. Law- 
rence Assoc $40 ;J4 

Cortland 15 00 

North Pitcher 4 87 



00 11 



Received by Mrs. L. TT. Cobb, 

Treas. Woman's H.M.Union: 

Brooklyn, Ladies' Sot-. Ch. 

of the Pilgrims, for Salary 

Fund $137 50 

Canandaigna 134 50 

Woodvillc, Ladies' Aux..._ 20 00 

-^—— 292 00 

Albany, First, by W. Gould, Jr. 110 10 

Mrs. E. W. Murphy, special 5 00 

ilrs. [aaac Edwards, special 5 00 

Mrs. i). A. Thompson, special 6 00 

Astoria, Mrs. M. A. Douglass, to const, 
herself a L. M 50 00 

Brooklyn, Swedish Evan. Cong. Pil- 
grim Ch., by J. Westbcrg...! G 2~> 

11. S. W.,$10; L. M.B.,$2 12 00 

Canandaigna, First, by E. G. Tyler, to 
const. Mrs. Isaphine P. Granger a L. 
M., and of which $50 from Mr. 

C. W. Dixson to const. Miss Alice 

A. Jewett a L. M 100 00 

Chenango Forks, by Rev. J. F. How- 
ard 8 00 

Columbus, by Rev. J. W. Keeler 10 00 

Elbridge, by A. B. Frazee 6 75 

Eldred, by Rev. II. P. Hamilton 5 00 

Ellington, by Rev. A. W.Taylor 4 00 

Henrietta, by Rev. A. W. H. Uodder.. 10 00 

Homer, B. W.Payne 10 00 

New Village and Farmingville, by 

Rev. F. A. Valentine S 00 

New York City, Broadway Tabernacle 

Ch., L. C. Warner 300 00 

Mrs. C. R. Robert, by Miss Mary 
Kearney, $(54; W. Abbatt, $1 ; A 
Friend, " Poor but Blessed " .50.. 65 50 

North Walton, by W. M. Hoyt 6 50 

Ogdensburg, First Ch., by S.*W. Leon- 
ard. 11 15 

Orient, Cong. S. S., by F. L. Young, 
in full, to const. Dea. M. B. Brown, 

aL. M 25 00 

Oswego Falls, by Rev. C. Olmsted.... 12 50 

Parishville, by Rev. O. C. Barnes 2 00 

Patchogue, by F. Hammond 22 57 

Philadelphia, by Rev. A. S. Wood.... 20 00 
Siloam and Fairview, by Rev. E. Rob- 
erts ." 5 00 

South Hartford, by Rev. W. M. Gay.. 6 00 

Syracuse, Plymouth Ch., by H. C. 

Hemingway. 51 63 

J. D. Cree<;an .... 1 10 

Walton, First, add'l, by G. W. Fitch. 1 00 

Warsaw, by W. A. Walker 17 29 

Correction: Jamesport, Ch., by Rev. 
W. Hedges, $6. Erroneously ac- 
knowledged in June. 

NEW JERSEY— $034.60. 
Cloeter, Cong. S. S., by Rev. G. W. 
Plack 9 15 

East Orange, Trinity Ch., add'l, by R. 

D. Weeks, in full, to const. Mrs. 
Sarah R. Halsey, H. R. Halsey, Miss 
Anna P. Halsey, Miss Carrie S. Mel- 
lick, E. Greene, O. II. Bowers, Miss 
Laura H. Bowers and Miss Sarah R. 
Adams L. Ms 16 00 

Montclair, Woman's II. M. Soc. of 
First Ch., by Mrs. J. J. Cooper, 

Treas. for Salary Fund 350 00 

Newfield, by Rev. C. Willey 10 00 

Orange Valley, by J. Bell 149 45 

Roselle, A Friend, for Woman's Dept. 50 00 

Summit, A member of the Central 
Presb. Ch 50 00 

PENNSYLVANIA— $31.08. 

Carbondale, by Rev. D. L. Davis 5 00 

Curtissville, A Friend 5 00 



Ebensburgh, Ladies' H. M. Soc, by 
Kev. G. 11111 

Harford, by Rev. C. C. Creegan _ 

Nanticoke, by Kev. J. G. Evans 

Riceville, Young Ladies' Soc, by Mrs. 
Westcott 

Spring Creek and West Spring Creek, 
by Uev. F. W. Westphal 

MARYLAND— $6.00. 

Frostburg, by II. B. Richards 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $40.34. 

Washington, Ladies' II. M. Soc. of the 
First Ch., by Miss Lizzie Patterson, 
for S.'ihirr Fund, $25; for freight, $2 
First Ch., by S. H. Galpin 

WEST VIRGINIA— $485.05, Legacy. 

Pennsboro, From the estate, of Mrs. 
Lucy II. Kimball, by M. P. Kimball. 

LOUISIANA— $10.60. 

Jennings, by Rev. M. T. Smedley 

FLORIDA— $59.35. 

Ft. Meade, $11.25; So. Lake Weir, 
$17.10 by Rev. M. Noble 

Lake Worth and Malabar, $9.75; Rev. 
A. B. Dilley, $5.25, by Rev. A. B. 
Dilley 

Philips, by Rev. F. P. Bachelar 

W T inter Park, Cong. S. S., for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian Fund, by A. H. 
Barrows 

TEXAS— $6.85. 

Paris, by II. S. Bettes 

INDIAN TERRITORY— $18.30. 

Hopkins, by Rev. H. H. Hines 

McAllister, Caddo and Lehigh, by Rev. 

W. H. nicks 

Vinita, Prof. J. McCarthy 

By Rev. N. M. W T heat 

ARIZONA— $35.05. 

Benson, by Rev. R. T. Liston 

TENNESSEE— $35.25. 

Knoxville, by Rev. J. H. Frazee 

Soddy, by Rev. L. Morgan 

OHIO— $671.41, of which Legacy 

Received by Rev. J. G. Frazer, 
Ohio, in April: 
Hudson, by Miss E. E. Met- 

calf _. $16 00 

Lenox, by G. Hyde 3 50 

Madison, Central Ch., by L. 

H.Kimball 36 65 

Marblehead, by Miss E. Mal- 

lory 5 15 

In May: 

Burton, by Rev. W. B. Marsh. $34 29 

Cleveland, First 5 00 

Plymouth Ch., by S. P. 

Churchill 54 64 

South Welsh, by Rev. E. 

R. Bowen 10 00 

AFriend 200 00 

Cuyahoga Falls, by C.Clark. 8 32 

Lexington, by G. Miller.... 12 00 

Medina, A Friend 5 00 

West Andover, by H. Hol- 

comb 2 63 

Zanesville, by £. H. Far- 

quhar, Jr 15 18 



8 08 

2 70 

5 00 

3 00 
2 38 

6 00 



27 00 
13 34 



485 05 



10 00 



28 35 



15 00 
6 00 



10 00 



6 85 



4 00 

5 00 
5 55 
3 75 



35 05 



30 50 
4 75 

$60.70. 



61 30 



347 06 



174 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



July, 



Received in March by S. P. 
Churchill, Treas. Bohemian 
Board, Cleveland: 

Cleveland, First Ch $25 00 

First Ch., S. S__ 15 00 

Jennings Avenue Ch _ 10 00 

Euclid Avenue Ch 31 35 

Pen-field, 8. S 1 70 

Centerville, Penn. S. S 3 19 

(iuv's .Mills, Penn. S. S 3 50 

Riceville, Penn. S. S_ 1 oo 

9074 

Received by Airs. Phebe A. 

Crafts, Treas. Woman's H. M. 

Union: 

Cincinnati, Walnut Hills Ch. 

W. AI. Soc 814 27 

Elvria, Ladies 1 H. M. Soe. FirM 

Ch 21 00 

Hudson, Ladies' H. AI. Soc... 3 33 
Medina, First Ch., Girls' Mis- 

sionBand 3 00 

Rootstown, Ladies' II. AI. Soc. 8 0G 

49 66 

Berlin Heights, S. S., by D. Stahl.... 10 00 

Cleveland, On account of Legacy of 

Elisha Taylor, by J. W. Taylor, 

Ex.. 60 70 

Collinvvood, by Rev. C. L. Hamlen... 10 75 

Findlay, by Rev. G. J. Jones 25 00 

Lucas, §7; Washington, $5; D. S. 

Jones, §3, 1 y Rev. D. S. Jones 15 00 

Nelson, Mis. .w. O. Beardsley 40 

Oberlin, A. Friend 80 

INDIANA— §43.50. 

Fremont, by Rev. J. R Preston 29 50 

Hammond, by Rev. W. W. Lineberry 4 00 
Hobart and Hebron, by Rev. D. W. 

Andrews 10 00 

ILLINOIS— $74.70. 

Received by Airs. B. F. Leavitt, Treas. 

Woman's II. AI. Union: 

Elgin, Woman's H. M. U 14 00 

Chicago, J. Mabbs.... 5 00 

Geneseo, Ladies' id. s. Soc, by Mrs. 

A. H. AlaninL'ton ' 50 70 

Oglesby, T. T. Bent... 5 00 

MISSOURI— $107.83. 

Received by Airs. A. E. Cook, 
Treas. Woman's II. AI. Soc.: 

Bevier, Ladies' II. AI. Soc $1 00 

Hannibal, Ladies' II. AI. Soc. 1 00 
Honey Creek, Ladies' H. AI. 

Soc 1 00 

Junction City, Ladies' II. AI. 

Soc 100 

Joplin, Ladies' II. AI. Soc 1 00 

Kansas City, Ladies' H. M. 

Soc. of Clyde Ch 7 91 

Meadville, Ladies' II. AI. b c 1 00 
St. Louis, Ladies' H. M. Soc. 

First Ch _ 39 00 

Young People's Miss. Soc. 

First Ch 3 00 

Springfield, The Children of 

the King, First Ch 8 00 

Ladies' II. AI. Soc. of Cen- 
tral Ch 10 00 

78 91 

Bevier, Ch., $11: Aleadville, W. H. AI. 

Soc. $7, by C. J. Sage 18 00 

Cameron, by Rev. F. A. Bissell _. 2 50 

Eldon, by J. Vetter 4 00 

Hamilton, by Rev. R. J. Mathews 22 10 

Hannibal, by Rev. G. T. Holcombe 10 77 
[$17.i;3 erroneously acknowledged in 

May.] 
Iberia and Unity, by Rev. R. T. Mar- 
low 10 50 

Mine La Alotte, by Rev. J. B. John- 
ston 9 00 

St. Louis, by Rev. G. M. Sanborne... 10 00 



542 



Thayer and Curry, by Rev. E. S. 
Curry. 2 05 

MICHIGAN— $1,168.41. 
Received by Rev. L. Warren: 

Almira $5 32 

Alpena 54 12 

Benton Harbor 10 00 

Carson City 5 00 

Clinton. 12 00 

East Tawas 2 71 

FilerCity 3 00 

Grand Rapids, South Ch 9 50 

Grass Lake.. 40 05 

Hubbardston 5 00 

Lexington, C. S. Nims_ 20 00 

Litchfield 19 51 

Ludington 38 45 

Owosso, Young People's No. 

Star Alission 3 54 

Port Huron, Ch., $60; S. S., 

$G0._ 120 00 

Tawas City 3 C6 

Three Oaks 70 CO 

Union City, Dea. I. YV. Clark 100 00 
Wacousta, Hannah Wood, 

$10; Dea. Oscar Hart, $10. 20 00 

Received by Airs. E. F. Grabill, 
Treas. Woman's II. AI. Union: 
Lansing, Mis. Leroy Warren 22 00 
Cheboygan, W. H. AI. S.,f^r 

Salary Fund 7 35 

Webster 6 50 

Saginaw Conference: 

Alpena.... .$32 25 

Blackmar _. 1 10 

Munger 4 27 

Tawas.... 4 30 

East Saginaw 41 81 

83 73 

St. Johns, Airs. Esler... 1 00 

Greenville 14 48 

Reed City 8 00 

Rondo, W. H. M. S., $5.60; 

Beacon Fund, $1.10 . 7 00 

Nashville, W. II. AI. S., for 

Salary Fund 2 57 

$152 63 
North Star Mission: 

Airs. Lane's Grand-children 30 

Pier port, five Sunday- 
school pupils 50 

South Emmett, Sunday- 
school 2 00 

Greenville, Sunday-school. 12 00 

White Cloud,Sund'y-school 3 40 

Ada, First Ch. Sunday- 
school 2 00 

Hersey, Sunday-school 1 80 

Lansing, Sunday - school, 
$15.50; Infant class, $1.90. 17 40 

Reeu City, The Cheerful 
Workers, $2.50; Sunday- 
school, $10. 12 50 

Watervliet, Union Sunday- 
school, $8.80; Stickney 
School - house Sunday 
school, 80c _ 9 CO 

St. Johns, Sunday school.. 15 00 

Chelsea, Sunday-school 4 05 

Augusta, Sunday - school, 

add'l 30 

Ashley, Sunday-school 1 10 

$81 95 234 58 
Additional: 
Charlevoix, Ladies of the 

Church.. 7 00 

East Saginaw 7 25 

Essexville 3 80 

St. Johns 10 00 

Traverse City, Mite Boxes... 5 00 

Union City 20 00 

$53 05 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



175 



North Star Mission: 

Benton Harbor, S. S 

Calumet, S. S 

Covert, S. S. 

Detroit, Ft. Wayne 8. S 
Thompson Avenue S. s 

Fayette Delta 8. S 

Filer, Ch. Mite Boxes 

Greenville, 8. S , add 1 

Lake Linden, S. S . 

Manistee, Mrs. Fairfield's 
Bible Class, $37; S. S., 
$88.80. 

Olivet, Friends, add'] 

Roohester, S S. 

Sugar island, S. S . 

Traverse ('it v. Y. P. S. 

C. E 



B Mi 

3:5 in 
50 

3 00 

i 80 

3 50 

ti 36 

1 15 

2 10 



50 30 



8 50 
1 00 



5 00 



gl 33 36 
Ada and East Paris, by Rev. W. Wil- 
cox. -. 

Addison, by Uev. ,1. 11. Cooper 

Augusta, by Rev. J. l>. Shultz 

Bangor, by Rev. A. B. Cochran _ 

Chase, by Rev. J. Nicol 

Cliesaning, by Rev. W. II. Millar 

Edmore, by Rev. A. Marsh 

Essexviile and Mungers, by Rev. W. 

D. King 

Fruitport, $11; Nunica,73c .; J. II. Dole, 

$5, by Rev. J. II. Bole 

Glen Arbor,$2.48; Maple City, $1.87; 

Solon, $4.47, by Rev. A. Metcalf 

Grand Junction, by Rev. E. I. Ayer.. 
Mancelona and Westwood, by Rev. B. 

J. Baxter _ _ 

Maybeeand Raisinville, by Rev. J. R. 

Mason __ 

Mecosta and Milbrook, by Rev. J. A. 

Curhaiu . 

Onondaga, by Rev. P. M. Crips 

Orion, by Rev. A. C. Webster 

Perry, by Rev. O. C. Bailey 

Red Jacket, by Rev. H. Kingman 

Rondo and Wolverine, by Rev. M. W. 

Tuck l 

Rosedale, by Rev. J. W. Holt 

Tipton, Franklin Ch., by Rev. II. A. 

Putnam 

Traverse City, First, by J. G. Johnson 

WISCONSIN— $12.58. 
Received by Rev. G. A. Hood : 

Tomahawk $2 00 

Washburn 38 52 



Peshtigo, by Rev. T. W. Spanswick. 
IOWA— $3.00. 
Aurelia, Mattie B. Marble 



MINNESOTA— $686. 97 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley : 
By Mrs. J. N. Cross, Treas. Woman's 
H. M. Soc: 

Austin $7 70 

Detroit, Special 5 00 

Duluth 35 00 

Excelsior 3 56 

Fairmont - 11 00 

Fanlovet, Mrs. Shoutz 5 00 

Hamilton 10 00 

Lamberton 2 65 

Marshall. 5 00 

Minneapolis, First 40 00 

Second 14 00 

Plymouth 38 00 

Y. L. M. S 22 00 

Lady 12 00 

Vine, Children's Miss. Band 2 52 

Como Avenue 10 00 

Lyndale, Special 20 00 

Union, Special 20 00 

Open Door, Special 5 00 



18G 41 

8 24 

10 00 
6 88 
3 00 

9 00 
5 00 
3 00 

3 00 

16 73 

8 82 

9 97 

11 65 

5 00 

1 75 

6 00 
20 00 

5 00 
27 20 

3 15 
5 00 

4 00 
32 37 



$40 52 
2 00 



$3 00 



Monticello 11 50 

Northfleld ... to on 

Villard 2 75 

Walnut Grove 2 75 

Waseca. 18 26 

$343 CO 

Received by 1,'ev. I). Magnus: 

Harris, 85c.; cannon Falls, $1.36; 

Kiim, $2; Cambridge, $3; Maple 

Ridge, §1; Clear Lake, $3.... 10 61 

Received by Rev. .1. Karl. Chs. and 

Individuals.... 163 58 

Barnsville, by Rev. J. W. Todd 4 00 

Claremont and Dodge Center, by Rev. 

F. S.VanEps 10 70 

Grand Meadow, by Rev. II. J. Colwell 13 50 

Granite Falls, by Rev. L. W. Chaney. 17 31 

Hamilton, by R. F. Engle 17 65 

Lakeland, bv Kev. .1. (handler 2 50 

Mentor, by Rev. W. W. McArth.ur.__ 12 50 
Minneapolis, Como Ave. ch., bv Rev. 

II. w. GL ason 15 00 

Princeton, by Rev. A. J. Hayner 2 16 

Sherburne, by Rev. R. L. D. Preston 5 00 

silver Lake, by Rev. G. S. Bascom .. 11 10 
Spring Valley," Cong. S. 8., by W. W. 

Williams 2 67 

Stephen, by Rev. W. Steele 5 00 

Stillwater, by Rev. J. W. Carlson . ... 4 00 
Wadena, $36; Yerndale, $10, by Rev. 

C. B. Fellows 46 00 

Waterville and Morristown, by Rev. 

F. Wrigley 10 00 

KANSAS— $212.83. 
Received by Rev. J. G. Dougherty, 
Treas. Kan. II. M. Soc: 
Kansas Woman's II. M. Soc.. $35 00 
Eureka, First 10 00 

$45 00 

Alma, by Rev, W. C. Wheeler... 6 00 

Bloomington, by Rev. F G. McHenry 7 00 

Blue Rapids, by Rev. W. M. Brown.. 7 61 

Chadron and Flag Butte, by Rev. G.J. 

Powell 14 00 

Chapman, Detroit and Enterprise, by 

Rev. J. H. Strong 17 25 

Dover and Wakarusa, bv Rev. L. H. 

Piatt. _ 2 00 

Downs, by Rev. O. A. Palmer 4 25 

Hiawatha, by Rev. J. B. Richardson.. 15 86 

Kirwin and Liberty, by Rev. R. F. 

Markham 1 30 

Lin wood and Lenape, by Rev. J. W. 

Spring 2 50 

Muscotah, $20 ; Netawaka, $1, by Rev. 

R. W. Harlow.. 21 00 

North Lawrence, by Rev. T. F. Norris 6 00 

Oneida, by Rev. G. H. Perry 3 00 

Parsons, by Rev. C. L. McKesson 22 50 

Pomona, by Rev. L. Newcomb.. 3 00 

Rotate, Gritzland and Sunnyside, by 

Rev. D. H. Minick.. 5 33 

Scatter Creek, W. M. Soc, $5 ; Scatter 

Creek Ch., $6.81; Center Ridge, $1.54 

by Rev. J. Wilde 13 35 

Severy, $6.53; Western Park, $5.35, by 

Rev. J. Cooper.... 11 88 

Wabaunsee, First Ch of Christ, by 

Rev. J. F. Willard 2 00 

Wichita, by Rev. F. Foster 2 00 

NEBRASKA— $407. 32. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile: 

Bertrand, by W. O. Axtell $10 00 

Blyville, by Dea. J. A. Baker 8 60 

Clarks, by Dea. L. P. Hawley... 5 61 
Friend, by Rev. W. E. Davidson 5 '00 
Omaha, St. Mary '6 Ave. Ch., by 
E. A. Mills 100 00 

Silver Creek, by A. E. Robbins... 4 68 

Steele City, by Rev. H. J. Ma- 
comber 4 76 

Sutton, German Ch., by W. Ru- 
ter 5 00 

143 65 



176 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



July, 



Received by Mrs. D. B. Perry, Treas. 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Soc: 

Camp Creek $2 00 

Columbus 3 00 

Exeter 9 00 

Fairmont, Juveniles 20 00 

Kearney -20 00 

Lincoln, First 31 00 

Milford. 7 05 

Monroe 2 00 

Omaha, Plymouth 8 00 

Syracuse 10 00 

Talmage 5 00 

Weeping Water 7 00 

West Hamilton 5 00 

$129 05 272 70 

Beatrice, by E. H. Ashmun 79 00 

Dustin and Richmond, by Rev. E. 

H. Libby 18 00 

Freewater, by Rev. J. W. Hadden 9 25 

Friend and Grafton, by Rev J. Lich. 8 87 

Glenrock, by Rev. 11. Bross 3 50 

Omaha, by Kev. J. H. Milligan . 6 00 

Strang and Shickley, by Rev. C. H. 

Eaton 5 00 

Stratton and Trenton, by Rev. G. 

W. Rich 5 00 

NORTH DAKOTA— $12.22. 

Received by Rev. C. A. Mack : 
Sanborn, Chs. and Individuals 12 22 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $97.62. 

Received by Mrs. Sue Fifield, Treae. 

Woman's H. M. Union : 

Esmond, W. M. S $1 00 

Iroquois, W. M. S 4 00 

Lake Preston, W. M. S 2 25 

Oahe, Shiloh Ch 1 00 

8 25 

Canton, Woman's H. M. Soc, by Mrs. 

C. G. Black 5 90 

Clark, by Rev. L. Kingsbury 3 00 

Eden, by Rev. R. Norton 9 00 

Elk Point, by Rev. L. P. Sabin 7 50 

Faulkton, by Rev. II. D. Wiard 16 75 

La Grange Township, by Rev. D. B. 

Nichols— 2 00 

Letcher and Firesteel, by Rev. L. E. 

Ebamfleld 5 00 

Milbank, by Rev. R. H. Battey.. ..... 22 00 

Salem, T. Bayne 1 00 

Valley Springs,by Rev.W. H. Watson. 17 22 

COLORADO— $23.75. 

Denver, Second, by Rev. W. D. Wes- 

tervelt 16 25 

By Rev. A. W. Coffrnan 2 50 

Otis and Hyde, by Rev. G. Dungan... 5 00 

WYOMING— $4.75. 

Big Horn, Becton and Sheridan, by 
Rev. S. J. Jennings 4 75 

MONTANA— $25.00. 

Helena, First Ch., by T. E. Goodwin.. 25 00 

CALIFORNIA— $317.20. 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford : 

Riverside Gen. Assoc $26 20 

San Bernardino 53 80 

80 00 

Clayton and Pacheco, by Rev. J. H. 

Strong - 1 35 

Los Angeles, by Rev. E. S. Williams. 25 00 

Lugonia, First, by C. H. Lathrop 22 00 

Murphys, by Rev. H. Chapman 3 00 

Oakland, by Rev. W. H. Cooke 5 00 

Pasadena, Mrs S. J. Eldridge 160 00 

Pescadero and Fairview, by Rev. D. F. 



Taylor 

San Bernardino, Highlands S. S., by 
G. E. Alpin 

San Diego, by Rev. A. B. White 

OREGON— $3.00. 

Received by Rev. G. H. Atkinson : 

Beaver Cre*ek, T. Thomas $2 00 

Oswego, Dea. O. Eaton 1 00 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $60.15. 

Atahnam, by T. C. Elliott 

Colfax, Plymouth Ch., by Miss M. Per- 
kins _ 

Endicott, by Rev. G. H. Atkinson 

Pine Valley and Lyle, by Rev. W. 
H. Henneck 

Union Ridge and La Center, by Rev. 
F. H. Fruiht 

CHINA— $5. 

Fanchow, Shansi, Rev. J.B.Thompson 

Home Missionary „ 



2 30 

3 55 



14 75 

14 50 
10 50 

1 00 

19 40 

5 00 
148 15 



$14,473 85 
Donations of Clothing, etc. 

Bristol, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 
through The Woman's Congrega- 
tional Home Missionary Union of 
Conn., by Mrs. N. L. Brewster, box.. $40 60 

Franklin, N. H., Mission Circle, by E. 
J. Gilchrist, box, cash and freight, _. 43 67 

Hartford, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 
of First Ch., through The Woman's 
Congl. Home Missionary Union of 
Conn., by Miss Emma Bunce, two 

barrels 146 00 

Ladies' Sewing Soc. of South Ch., 
through The Woman's Congl. H. M. 
Union of Conn., by Mrs. Charles H. 
Smith, box 158 63 

Kansas City, Mo., First Ch., by Mrs. C. 
S. Rood, barrel 125 00 

New Haven, Ct., Ladies' Aid Soc. of 
United Ch.,by Louise H. De Forest, 
box and freight 160 91 

New York City, State Charities Aid 
Assoc, by Burrall Hoffman, box. 

Rochester, Vt., box. 

Stratford, Ct, Ladies' Sew. Soc, by 
Mrs. Bunnell, box. 

Warsaw, N. Y., M. D. Jenks, box 89 27 



NEW HAMPSHIRE HOME MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the New Hampshire Home Mission- 
ary Society from January 1 to March 31, 1888. 
L. D. Stevens, Treas. 

Amherst $5 00 

Boscawen 9 47 

Bedford 13 54 

Bethlehem, Mrs. E. P. Brown 1 00 

Brentwood 5 00 

Bryn Mawr, Penn., Mrs. L. F. Bouton.. 5 00 

Campton 1100 

Concord, South Ch., to const. Rev. H. 
P. Dewey and Dea. Frank Coffin 

L. Ms.... 127 00 

A Friend, for A. H. M. S., $200; A 

Friend: for A. H. M. S., $4 204 00 

Derry, East . 2 03 

First Cong'l 80 00 

Farmington, First 15 85 

Gilmanton 16 11 

Gilsum 4 47 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



177 



Greenville 3 00 

Great Falls 25 00 

Groveland, Mass., Legacy of Abigail 

Parker 50 00 

Hampton, for A. H. M. S 7 50 

Hampetead, for A. H. M. S 18 00 

Haverhill, for A. H. M. S., to const. Rev. 

E. W. Stoddard L. M 37 50 

Henniker, S. S. Class of Zepha Barnes, 

Mite Box coll 8 00 

Hooksett 5 47 

Keene, Balance of Legacy of Ezra Liv- 

ermore 40 00 

Second, Sunday-school 48 50 

Lisbon 7 G3 

Manchester, Hanover St 77 28 

Mason, Mrs. 1'. W. Wilson, for A. II. 

M S 4 00 

Meredith Village 50 00 

New Ipswich 75 

Newport 65 77 

Northwood 20 76 

Pembroke, Widow's Mite, $2; Ch. and 

Soc, $79.50 81 56 

Penacook 13 70 

Peterborough, for A. H. M.S. 40 00 

PlaistOW and No. Haverhill, Mrs. Eliza 

W. Merrill 25 00 

Plymouth. 7 45 

Portsmouth, North Ch. and Soc 150 55 

Temple, Sunday -school, for A. II. M. S. 11 34 

Union 11 00 

Weare, Legacy of Robert S. Fifleld 13 75 

Walpole 14 40 

Warner 8 52 

Wolfboro, Interest on Trust Fund of 

Nancy II. Lord 4 00 

Wolfboro 23 20 

New Hampshire Cent. Soc 303 00 



,082 22 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary 
Society, in May, Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treas. 

Acton, West, Mrs. Rev. J. W. Brown, 

for A. H. M. S. $5 00 

A Friend 10 00 

Amherst, College, by W. C. Esty 25 00 

Second, by II. Sabin 8 17 

Ashburnham, First, by M. M. Stowe... 34 15 

Boston, "B. & L." 5 00 

Boylston, by F. J. Leighton, special.. 66 61 

Dorchester, A Friend, "B." Thank- 
offering _ 5 00 

Charlestown, Winthrop, S. S., by Geo. 
S. Cole, for French Prot. Coll 15 00 

Old South, by Geo. R. Chapman 810 00 

Roxburv, A Friend 5 00 

West, South, Evan., by J. H. Guild, 5 00 

Braintree, Sarali II. Thayer, for bell for 

Ch. in Kansas 5 00 

Bridgewater, Scotland, by Mrs. S. O. 

Keith 22 50 

Brockton, Campello, by E. B. Estes, to 

const. Mrs. Ella L. Washburn and 

Mrs. Jennie Owens, L. Ms. of A. H. 

M. S. 100 00 

Brookfield, special for " Le Semeurs.". 50 00 

Cambridgeport, Pilgrim, Ladies' Miss. 

Soc, bv Mrs. L. G. Case, to const. 

Mrs. R.'V. Rugg, L. M. of A. H. M. S. 50 00 

Chesterfield, by Rev. Elihu Loomis, 

add'l 5 00 

Cohasset, Beechwood, by Rev. Geo. O. 

Jenness 3 27 

Concord. Trim, by T. Todd 35 74 

Dana by Rev. J. G. Willis 130 

Dartmouth, South, Ladies' Cent So- 

ciety, 1>T Mrs. E. G. Gifford 5 00 

Deerfield, South, by C. A. Stowell, with 

prev. gifts to const. Rev. John Cowan 



and Miss Helen E. Tilton, L. Ms 50 95 

Erving, by Rev. Ira A. Smith 8 00 

Foxboro, by Horace Carpenter 59 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Horace Carpenter.. 10 00 

Grafton, Evan., by Geo. K. Nichols 69 94 

Greenwich, Ladies' H. Miss. Soc, by 

Rev. E. I'. Blodgett 30 42 

Holland, William H. Harris 5 00 

Hampden Benev. Association, 

by Charles Marsh, Treas: 

Holyoke, Second $150 00 

Westfleld, First 5 00 

Second 170 02 

325 62 

Hyde Park, First, by J. Kllery Piper... 119 22 
Lancaster, Ladies' Sewing Circle, byM. 

A. Albee 10 00 

Lawrence, Lawrence St., Miss P. A. 

Mills 5 00 

Trinity, S. S., by W. II. Gile, for 

Iroquois, Dak., parsonage __ 20 00 

Littleton, by J. F. Houghton. 46 50 

Lynntielil, South, Second, by Rev. ILL. 

Brickett 5 00 

Mass., A Friend, J. F. R, to be given to 

largest needs. 100 00 

Medford, Mystic, Ladies' II. M. Soc, by 

MisBKateE. Harlen.. 20 00 

Middleboro, Miss Eliza Eddy, by 

Thomas Weston, Jr 5 00 

New London, Conn., Trust Est. of N.P. 

Haven, for "LeSemeur." __ 50 00 

New Salem, by Rev. A. R. Plumer, add'l. 

to thank-offering for R.M.Taft's work 1 00 

Newton Center, Trust gift, from Est. of 

Miss Rebecca P. Ward, by B. W. 

Kingsbury.. 50 00 

Mrs. Horace Cousens and Miss 

Cottsens, for French College 10 00 

Northbridge, First, by J. W. Morse 16 00 

Plain ville, by Rev. H. H. Osgood, thank- 
offering for Rev. R. M. Taft's work.. 5 50 

Reading, by S. G. B. Pearson 25 00 

Somerville, East, Franklin St., by Al- 

pheus Bowers. 46 54 

Sterling, S. S. Class, by Emma A. Wilder 2 00 

Taunton, Winslow, by Edgar H. Reed, 

to const. Rev. Geo. H. Reed, L. M. of 

A. H.M. S 76 47 

Wakefield, by M. J. Hill, for A. H. M.S. 75 00 

Wellesley, by D. S. Short Ill 57 

Westhampton, by A. D. Montague 38 02 

Whitman, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss J. L. 

Faunce 15 50 

Winchester, First, by Eugene Tappan.. 170 00 
Woonsocket, R. I., Mrsf Percival Wil- 
liams, by Rev. L. M. Pierce . 1 00 
Worcester, Park, by C. S. Knight - 6 00 

South, Conference, by A. Armsby 20 84 

$2,882 49 
Home.Miseionary 1 20 



$ !,883 09 



Donations of clothing, etc., received and reported 
at the rooms of the Mass. Home Miss. Society 
in May. 

Dalton, Ladies' Sewing Soc, by Miss 
Clara L. Crane, barrel, half-barrel and 
freight $121 54 

Gloucester, J. J. Pew, wearing apparel, 
unappraised. 

Hvde Park, Woman's II. M. Union, by 

Mrs. D. W. Lewis, barrel 50 00 

Lowell, Kirk St., Y. P. S. C. E.. by Kate 
E. Johnson, barrel and freight _ 62 62 

Worcester, Central, Ladies' Benev. Soc, 
by Mrs. C. L. Sumner, barrel and 
freight 107 70 

Worcester, Union, Y T oung Woman's As- 
sociation, by Mrs. Frank E. Kimball, 
barreland freight 52 00 



$393 86 



178 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



July, 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTI- 
CUT. 

Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut 

in May, Ward W. Jacobs, Treas. 

Branford, by Rev. Henry P. Bake, of 
which II. O. Harrison and H. P. Bake 

contributed $10 each $30 94 

Cheshire, by A. C. Peck 13 25 

Hartford, Pearl Street, by Dea. G. M. 

Welch 40 42 

Newington, by II. M. Robbins IN 30 

Norfolk, liy J. X. Cowles 28 80 

Old Saybrook, by Robert Chapman, 

quarterly 37 00 

Orange, West Haven, by Wm. II. Tall- 

madge 44 95 

Plainfield, by R. Ensworth, annual 18 50 

Plymouth, George Langdon, personal.. 50 00 

Prospect, by Rev. Wm. 'II. Phipps 11 25 

Thomaston, bv P. Darrow. . 15 68 

Wethersfleld, by S. P. Willard 72 31 

Winchester, West Winsted, by John 

Hinsdale, add'] 9 C2 

Woman's Cong'1 Home Missionary 
Union of Ct., by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, 
Sec'y 150 00 

$149 48 



Boxes. 
Wcstport, Sangatuck, Beneficent Soci- 
ety, box,value 75 00 

ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Illinois Honu Missionary Society 
in April and May, Aaron B. Mead, Treas. 

Atkinson _ $10 GO 

Bureau, in support of services 9 58 

Champaign 40 68 

Chebanse, Y. P. S. C. E 5 3(5 

Cheltenham, Mrs. Dolly A. Ferris, spe- • 

cial..._ 1 00 

Special 4 40 

Chicago, First _. 134 49 

Plymouth, Ladies' Aid Soc 100 00 

Cragin 8 50 

De Pue, in support of services 33 50 

Dongola, in support of services 95 05 

Downer's Grove, " S." 5 00 

Dwight 5 10 

Earlville, J. A. D 50 00 

Evanston, First (for Evangelist's Tent). 175 00 

Forrest... _ 21 59 

Galesburg, First Ch. of Christ, special. 26 00 

Granvilk-; Y. P. Miss. Soc 15 00 

Stephen Harrison _ _ 50 00 

Greenville, Hyacinth Mission Circle 91 

Hyacinth Mission Cir., Children's Bo- 
hemian Fund 2 49 

Hermosa 1 50 

Hinsdale _ 10 00 

Woman's Miss. Soc 13 00 

Mrs. Sarah L. Kennedy. 100 00 

La Harpe, W. H. M. Union.... 8 25 

Lock port 14 25 

Lombard, $3.f0; Isaac Claflin, special, $5 8 50 

Lyndon 25 00 

Lyonsville, $8.75; S. S.,$5.87... 14 62 

Marseilles, special 42 00 

Melvin, Ladies' Soc 10 00 

Naperville, R. II. Dickinson 25 00 

New Grand Chain j 2 50 

Oak Park, Ladies' Benev. Soc 25 50 

Oglesby, T. T. Bent 5 00 

OTney _■ 14 00 

Ottawa, Ladies' II. M. Soc 18 30 

28 00 

Piano, special 8 80 

Prospect Park, L. Lewellyn Lloyd 1 00 

Quincy, First Union 185 on 

Ridge 'Prairie 2 50 



Rockford, First, Ladies' Soc, for Bohe. 

work ._ 8 05 

Second, Ladies' Soc. 4 00 

Rosemond 100 00 

Sandoval, speeial 7 46 

Seward, Kendall Co 15 16 

Shabbona 75 25 

Somonauk, Ladies' Soc 8 96 

South Chicago, for the Debt 1OO0 

South Danville, special 4 78 

St. Charles.... 20 05 

Stillman Valley, Y. P. S. C. E 5 33 

Toulon, W. II. 'M. U 5 30 

Ullin _ . 25 00 

Viola. Widow's Mite, for Egyptian Fund 1 00 
Washington Heights, Bethany Union, 
Mrs. Mary F. Howe, $2; Mr. Edward 

Y. Howe,' $3 5 00 

Winnebago, special 100 

Yorkville, Bristol Ch 16 75 

Mrs. Edw. P. Keyes, Newbury, Yt 10 00 

Chicago Sem., Soc. of Inquiry 15 (50 

Rev. R. W. Purdue, special 3 50 

Rev. A. Ethridge, special 28 00 

Pre-payment of bequest of Dwight Need- 
ham, Peoria - 1,000 00 

Rev. W. A. Nichols, Lake Forest 5 00 

A Friend, special 113 85 

Bureau Ass'n for De Pue Mission 110 00 



$2,956 91 



IOWA HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Iowa Home Missionary Society in 
April. J. II. Merrill, Esq. , Treas. 

Alden, S. S., $5; Woman's Society, 

$6.35 11 35 

Algona, Woman's Soc. 3 00 

Allison 25 00 

Aiwa 9 04 

Ames, S. S._ _ 15 72 

Andover, Mass., Rev. A. W. Archibald. 5 00 

Anamo6a, $40: Woman's Society, $4.20 44 20 
Atlantic, $110.75; Woman's Society, $20; 

S. S. $16.25 147 00 

Beacon _ . 38 25 

Bear Grove : . . 17 00 

Bellevue, Woman's Soc, $4.50; Y. P. S. 

C. E., $6.28. 10 78 

Bentonsport _ 8 50 

Big Rock 6 00 

Cass 25 00 

Castana 7 50 

Cedar Falls 34 50 

Cedar Rapids, Woman's Society, $40; 

Rev. C. A. Towle, $5 _. 45 00 

Center _ __ 7 45 

Charles City, $61; Woman's Soc, $5; 

S. S., $25.... _ 9100 

Cherokee, Friends. 8 no 

Clay, $9.25; Woman's Soc, $7.35 16 GO 

Clinton 60 32 

Correctionville 1 00 

Creston 4! 56 

Danville... 12 65 

Davenport, German ... 5 00 

Denmark, $40; Woman's Soc, $8; 

Friends, $6; Y. P. S. C. E., $5 59 00 

Des Moines, North Park, $4.50; Wo- 
man's Soc, $25 29 50 

Des Moines, Plymouth, $46.25; Woman's 

Soc, $57.17; S. S., $50 153 40 

Dubuque, $43.86; Woman's Soc, $16... 59 86 
Durant, $7.50; Woman's Soc, $3; 

Friends, $5 15 50 

Eagle Grove 10 00 

Earlville 46 00 

Eddyville 5 80 

Eldon 30 00 

Eldora, Woman's Soc, $15 46; S. S.,$5; 

Friends, $7 50 27 96 

Elliot, $45; Friends, $5... 50 00 

Ellsworth — 6 80 

Excelsior 22 06 



l.sss 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



179 



Farmington 3 00 

Farragut 42 25 

Fairfield, Woman's Soc, $4.25; S. s.,§6; 

Friends, §20 30 25 

Payette.. i; 00 

Fontanelle 103 58 

Garden Prairie, $5; Woman's Soc, $5.. 10 00 

Given 25 00 

Gowrie S!0 87 

Green Mountain 18 70 

Grinnell,W Oman's Soc 75 85 

Friends . 44 00 

Hampton, S. 8 20 00 

Harlan, $11.43; Wuiiuu's Soc, §1.25; 

S. 8., $1.3ti 47 04 

Hastings, a Friend. 14 58 

Hawarden 35 00 

Hull. $12.88; Woman's Soc, $4 16 83 

Humboldt, L. Winne 50 00 

Iowa City, $52.20; Woman's Soc, $50.. 102 20 

Independence, Friends 5 00 

Jefferson, A Friend 10 00 

Kellogg lit il 

Keokuk, $147.88; Woman's Society, $28 165 88 

Keosauqua 40 oo 

Kirkville 3 00 

Knoxville, A Friend 2 00 

Lamoille 5 66 

Lamotte, Alex. M. (M)«le 100 00 

Lansing, $6.25; Woman's Soc, $5 11 25 

Lansing Ridge, Woman's Soc. 5 00 

Le Mars, §110; Woman's Soc, $5.30; S. 

S., $10; Rev. N. L. Burton, $10 85 30 

Lewis, $46.01; Woman's Soc., $6; S. S., 

s". 57 00 

Long Creek 35 50 

Lyons, $77.80; S. S.,$10 87 30 

Magnolia, $8; Woman's Soc, $2.00; S. 

8., §5 15 60 

Manson.. 18 50 

Maquoketa 46 95 

Manchester, Woman's Soc 10 00 

Marion.. 61 00 

Mason City, $26; Woman's Soc, $3 29 00 

Midland, $2.17; Woman's Soc, $5 7 IT 

Miles 30 00 

McGregor, Woman's Soc 10 00 

Mitchellville 10 00 

Monticello, $-10; Woman's Soc. ,$25 65 00 

Mt. Pleasant 8 52 

New Providence 5 00 

New York . . 8 80 

Oakland 6 00 

Ogden 5 00 

Old Man's Creek 57 21 

Orient, $1: A Friend, $5 6 00 

Oskaloosa, §9(3.50; Woman's Soc, $5.. 101 50 
Osage, Woman's Soc, $4.50; S. S., 

$26.65 31 15 

Otrumwa, First 136 50 

Second 16 05 

Percival 6 50 



Pleasant Grove 7 51 

Polk city 10 38 

Postville, Woman's Soc. 15 00 

Rock Rapids 16 73 

Red Oak, Friends ... 38 60 

Rockford, Woman's Soc, $1.80; Friends, 

§7...' 8 80 

Rockwell m 05 

Sar| eant's Bluffs 5 95 

Sheldon, §5; Woman's Soc, §2 7 00 

Sherrill's .Mound, $8.50; Woman's Soc, 

$4.30 72 80 

Sherwood 22 00 

Salem, Woman's Soc 12 00 

Silver Creek, §1:1.55; A Friend, $2.98... 16 53 

Sioux City, First 168 88 

Mayflower 5 00 

Sioux Rapids 13 90 

Sloan 7 72 

Soldier River . 1 50 

Spencer, $50; S. S.,$10; A Friend, $5.. 65 00 
Storm Lake, §51.03; Woman's Soc, $10; 

S. S., $10.50.... 71 53 

Tabor 157 93 

Woman's Soc, $5; S. S., $2.32 . . 7 32 

Tipton, Y. P. S. C. E 10 00 

Traer, $9.16; Woman's Soc, $20 29 16 

Van Cleve 14 75 

Washta.... 2 98 

Waterloo, Friends 2 00 

Waucozna, $26; Woman's Soc, $16 42 00 

Webster City, §30; Woman's Soc, $5.. 35 00 

Wells, §3.75; Woman's Soc, $1 4 75 

Wittenburg, §18.32; Woman's Soc, §5. 23 32 



§4,236 33 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY 
SALARIES. 

Previously acknowledged $4,488 38 

Connecticut, Hartford 209 00 

District of Columbia, Washington 25 00 

Massachusetts, Boston, $300.55 ; Pitts- 
field, $25.58. 326 13 

Michigan, Cheboygan, $7.35; Nashville, 

$2.57; Rondo, $7. — 10 92 

New Jersey. Montclair 350 00 

New York," Brooklyn 137 50 

$5,552 93 



CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledged $2,547 58 

Connecticut, Middletown 4 24 

Florida, Winter Park 10 00 

Massachusetts, Ware 25 00 

New Hampshire, Pelhani 10 00 

$2,596 82 



180 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



July, 1888. 



WlonmrCs Mtitz Jt. 2JX. ©K£jatii*ati0us. 



New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org. 

1805, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Concord, Sec. 
Minnesota Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. 1872, Mrs. H. L. Chase, Minneapolis, Sec. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1880, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, Bangor, Sec. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1881, Mrs. Leroy Warren, Lansing, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 1881, Mrs. Geo. L. Epps, Topeka, Sec. 
Ohio, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1882, Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Oberlin, Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 1883. Mrs. William Spalding, 6 

Salmon Block, Syracuse, Sec. 
Wisconsin, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 1883, Mrs. C. Matter, Brodhead, Sec. 
North Dakota, Woman'6 Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1883, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Har- 

wood, Sec. 

Washington, f Woman,s Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org! July, 1884, Mrs. N. F. Cobleigh, 
Walla Walla, Sec. 

South Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary 
Union, org. Sept., 1884, Mrs. S. E. Young 
Sioux Falls, Sec. 



Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Jan., 1885, Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, Hart- 
ford, Sec. 
Missouri, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1885, Mrs. E. P. Bronson, 3100 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1885, Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Iowa, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

June, 188G, Miss Ella E. Marsh, Grinnell, Sec. 
California, Woman's Home Missionary Society 

org. Oct., 1887, Mrs. M. L. F. Eastman, San 

Francisco, Sec. 
Nebraska, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

Nov., 1887, Mrs. L. F. Berry, Fremont, Sec. 
Florida, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Feb. 1888, Mrs. N. Barrows, Winter 

Park, Sec. 
Indiana, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1888, Mrs.,W. E. Mossman, Fort Wayne, 

Sec. 
Southern California, Woman's Home Missionary 

Union, org. May, 1888, Mrs. H. K. W. Bent, 

Pasadena, Sec. 



'Smitltout a M0matfs otitic g. BX. ©vgauteaticrti. 



Alabama. 

Arizona. 

Arkansas. 

Carolinas. 

Colorado. 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Georgia. 

Idaho. 



Indian Territory. 
Kentucky. 
Louisana. 
Maryland. 

Massachusetts. 
Mississippi. 
Montana. 
Nevada. 
New Jersey. 



New Mexico. 

Pennsylvania. 

Rhode Island. 

Tennessee. 

Texas. 

Utah. 

Vermont. 

Virginia. 

Wyoming 



IpXissiouavij goscs. 

For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the homes of 
its missionaries, with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance of these favors 
is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just di6tributiou, attention is invited 
to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, if practi- 
cable, how soon a box will probably be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applying to the Secretaries, notify them without delay so as to 
guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. If several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the Secre- 
taries, whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, not 
by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise as " fast freight," by railroad, 
taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in the box, 
and the money, $2, $3, or $4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of freight (if it 
cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter of acknowledgment 
should be addressed. 

6. Report to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated valne, and the amount sent 
for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the Secretaries, 
put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from whom it comes, and 
the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of acknowledgment. 

8. Mark the box, "American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New York," 
adding the name of the place from which it comes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing money for freight, and stating the time when and the line by 
which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide in the assignment 
of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and sen of each child for whom 
the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants of the Society. It needs the same amount of 
money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no such gifts were 
provided: and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or diminish their contribu- 
tions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are needful. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



The Argus Printing Co. 

No. 44 Montgomery Street, 

JERSEY CITY. 

New York Office, - - 150 Nassau Street. 
♦ 

OUR JOB DEPARTMENT. 

TTAVING recently added the latest styles of type, and all modern improve - 
ments pertaining- to this department, and employing the best workmen, 
we are prepared to execute First-class Printing at moderate prices. 



OUR BOOK DEPARTMENT. 

TN this department we are second to none in the State. With a large force 
of compositors, and the only type-setting machines in New Jersey, we can 
furnish all classes of Book and Law Printing with great despatch. 



OUR PRESSWORK DEPARTMENT, 

/^CCUPYING three floors of our magnificent building, and filled with the 
latest improved machinery, is able to cope with any house in New York 
as to prices and speed in turning out all kinds of presswork. 



OUR ELECTROTYPING DEPARTMENT 

TS a new departure in the printing trade in Jersey City, and with the newest 
■*■ labor-saving machinery, we can guarantee PERFECT WORK and entire satis- 
faction with the productions of this department. 



ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED. 



— ♦ 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 




No More 
Aching Backs!! 



No More 
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SAVE 
TIME! 



SAVE 
LABOR 

The Automatic Washing Machine 

THE ONLY PERFECT 

Substitute for the Old Time Rubbing Board ! 



Ready for IMMEDIATE USE upon either ROUND or STATIOMARY TUBS 

ABSOLUTELY HO WEAR OR TEAR TO THE GARMENT. 
CALL AND SEE IT AT WORK. PRICE SIX DOLLARS. 

Agents Wanted Everywhere upon Liberal Terms. 
SEND FOR CIRCULAR. 

THE UTILITY COMPANY 

71 WARREN ST., NEW YORK CITY. 






THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



MOZART PARLOR ORCAN and AVERY SEW- 
INC MACHINE, Worth $150, Both for $60.. 

gg^ A GREAT 

COMBINATION. 




DIMENSIONS: Height, 
74 in.; Depth, 24 in.; 
Length, 45 in.; Weight, 
boxed, 850 lbs. 

This II :i n d some 
Parlor Organ, 5 Oc- 
taves, c i> ii t a i n i H ff 
Four Sets <>f Reeds, 
> i ii <• Std ]is, Two 
Knee Swells, Price, 

!S!M) 00. 

egance of Finish, 
E i as tici ty of Touch, 
Pipe-like Tone. Origin 



NEW improved high 
arm, new mechanical 
principles and rotary 
movements, automatic, 
direct and perfectaction 
cylinder shuttle. Belf- 
acting needle, positive 
feed, no springs, few 
paris, minimum weight, 
no friction, no noise, no 
wear.no fatigne,no"tan- 
trums," capacity unlim- 
ited, always in order, 
richly o r n a m e n l ed, 



ality of Design. Beauty nickel plated, and gives 
of style. perfect satisfaction. 

Saving perfected arrangements for the purpose 
of introduction, with the manufacturers of the 
above Organs and Sewing Machines, which are 
listed at S'.Vi 00 and $60.00 respectively, we are able 
to offer both at the price of the Sewing Machine, 
$60.00. Both fully guaranteed satisfactory or 
money refunded. Address for further particulars, 
or cal'l and examine at the warerooms of the Sew- 
in- Machine and Organ Association. 

(From the Christian at Work.) 

We hereby call the attention of our patrons to 
the sewing machine and parlor organ combina- 
tion, bv which both of these valuable articles 
(which every well-ordered home rinds so indis- 
pensable) are offered at the price of an ordinary 
sewing machine. The reference given, that of the 
Alford & Berkele Co., is snfficient with us to be- 
lieve that the Company will do as they say. We 
consider it one of the best offers ever made in this 
direction. 

F. C. CAXDEK & CO.. Sole Agents. 
No. 7 West 14th Street, New York City. 

Reference, THE ALFORD & BERKELE CO., 
P. O. Box 2002. ~i7 Chambers Street. 




HEALTHY 



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; s iv D LEADING RETAILERS 

[Everywhere. tS^Be sure your corset is 
I stamped "GOOD SENSE." Take 
, no other. Send for descriptive circular. 

FERRIS BROS. Manufacturers, 
341 Broadwav, NEW YORK. 
MARSHALL FIELD A- CO., CHICAGO, 
WHOLESALE WESTERN AGEATS. 



CLINTON H. MENEELY BELL CO. 

TROY. NEW YORK, 

Manufacture Superior. 
CHURCH and SCHOOL BELLS. 



MENEELY & COMPANY, 
WEST TROY, N. Y., BELLS, 

! For Churches, Schools, etc., also Chimes 
and Peals. For more than half a.century 
noted for superiority over all others. 



MARVELOUS 




DISCOVERY. 



Wholly unlike artificial systems. 
Cure of mind wandering. 

Any book learned in one reading. 
Classes of 10S7 at Baltimore, 1 0(>5 at Detroit, 
1500 at Philadelphia, 1113 at Washington, 
1 j> 1 «J at Boston, large classes of Columbia Law 
students, at Yah-, \\ ellesley, Oberlin, University 
of Penn., Michigan University, Chautauqua, &c. 
&c. Indorsed by RiriiARD Proctok, the scien- 
tist, lions. W. w. Astor, Judah P. Benjamin, 
,1i dge Gibson, Dr. Brown, E. II. Cook, Prin. 
N. Y. State Normal College, &c. Taught by 
correspondence. Prospectus post free from 
PROF. LOISETTE, 237 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 



DEAFNESS 




Entirely relieved by an invisible device 
which isthe same to the ears as plasse3 
to the eyes. 'Worn for months without 
removal. Successful where every other 
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H.A.WALES, Brldgeport.Conrt 

THE " MICRO - AITDTPHONE." FOR DEAFNESS. Call 
or address for book, 128ii Broadway, N. Y. 

XOTICE 

TO 

ADVERTISERS. 

All letters, orders or communications 
in reference to advertising in The 
Home Missionary, should be ad- 
dressed to 

THE ARGUS PRINTING CO.,- 

44 Montgomery St., 

Jersey City, N. J. 
150 Nassau Street, 

New York City- 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

ANNOU NCE MENT. 

China Mattings are being more extensively used every year. The colorings and designs being 
artistic and goods inexpensive and durable. From the low price in white of $3.75 per roll 40 yards. 
Fancy from $4.00. Japanese seamless, from $5.00 roll. Extensive assortment in fine Fancy, 
White and Damask Patterns at low prices. 

CARPET IN OS. 

We are displaying a large line in Ingrains, Brussels, "Velvet, Moquettes, Axminsters, and they 
should be seen to be appreciated. Our line of Mats and Rugs should not be overlooked. Sizes 
from 18x36 inches to 12x15 feet. Chairs and Rockers have recently been added to stock. Ladies' 
Sewing Rockers, at 75c. Children's Chairs, 2oc. A full line of Hotel, Balcony and Porch Chairs. 
Also Upholstered Chairs and Rockers at very close prices. Inspection invited. 



ANDREW 

Near Eighth Street, 



LESTER'S SONS, 

739 & 741 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



a 



K" OXYGEN TREATMENT. 



Office and Parlors: 31 Gramercy Park, New York. 

Oxygen as a remedial agent has received the unqualified endorsement of physicians and the pub- 
lic. During the recent illness of General Sheridan there was no improvement until Oxygen was 
administered. Oxygen is not a DRUG, but a "VTTAL.1ZER ; literally, a blood food and 
purifier, which restores tone to the nerves and presides over all vital changes towards the health 
standard. 

It is used in both office and H03IE TREATMENT; is acapted to all phases of chronic 
disease, especially of the Stomach, Liver, Rowels, Skin and Air Passages, and it stands 
alone as the remedy for Asthma, Catarrh, Consumption and Debility. 

Send for our Treatise on "K" OXYGEN TREATMENT, which will be mailed free to 
those who give us their full name and address. 

KNICKERBOCKER OXYGEN SUPPLY CO., 

31 Cramercy Park, New York City. 

N. B.— We manufacture all kinds of Oxygen Apparatus for Physicians, Schools, Hospitals, 
&c. Send for our Descriptive Price List. 



TH £ B EST 

INVESTMENT 

for the Family, the School, or the Profes- 
sional or Public Library, is a 

copy of the latest issue of Webster's Unabridged. 

* ONABRWGtdil Ll3 % ARY . 
fDIOTIONAliig' /TSELF 



Besides many other valuable features, it contain^ 

A Dictionary 

of 118,000 Words, 3000 Engravings, 

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WEBSTER IS THE STANDARD 

Authority in the Gov't Printing Office, and with 
the U. S. Supreme Court. It is recommended 
by the State Sup'ts of Schools in 36 States, and 
by the leading College Presidents of the United 
States and Canada. 



Illustrated Pamphlet sent free. 
C. k C. MERRIAM A. CO., Pub'rs, Springfield, Masj. 




DEATH TO BLOOD POISON. 

Mr. W. F. Palev, So Sands Street, Advertising Agent 
of the Brooklyn Elevated Kailroad, writes: " Inflamma- 
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their natural size. 1 suffered excruciating pain. Your 
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FOR THE BLOOD, 

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Water Valley, Miss.: Our little girl, Jessie, had 
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without avail. Swift's Specific cured her. 

D. R. Wagner. 

Treatise on Blood and Skin Diseases mailed 
Free! 

THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO.. 

756 Broadway, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price could not 
well be less. Its whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they prefer to pay, 
it will be sent without further charge, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members; Missionaries 
of the Society and its Auxiliaries; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their Congregations; 
also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy for every ten dollara collected and 
paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. Pas- 
tors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this Journal at the 
Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 



APPLICATIONS FOR AID. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should make 
a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an application. They 
should also give these particulars, Yiz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations. 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office address : Town, County, State. 

Does he reside on his field of labor ? Is he installed pastor ? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry ? 

Of what local church is he a member? 

Of what Ministerial Association ? 

The number of persons composing his'family. 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people, and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage ? 

Is aid expected from any other source 1 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. S. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year f 

Amount contributed to the Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the conditions, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by the 
trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose limits the congregation is found, has a " Committee 
of Missions, " the members of that Committee should certify these statements, the standing of the 
minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no such " Committee 
of Missions' 1 exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more neighboring clergymen 
acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet gathered, applicants will follow 
the same course as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary of the 
Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application ; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing all the 
particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To this the certificate of the missionary that the 
congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 



FORM OP A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trusty to pay over the same 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall 

act as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the 
year eighteen hundred and twenty.six, to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said 

Society, and under its direction. 



JULY, 1§8S. 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible Mouse, *lstor Place, JVew York. 



Rev. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 
Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D., > , > „ 

Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D.D., \ Sectaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. CLAPP, D.D., Treasurer. 

Executive Committee:— Mr. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; Mr. WM. HENRY SMITH; Rev. WM. M. 
TAYLOR, D. D.; Mr. CHARLES H. PARSONS; Mr. ALBERT WOODRUFF; GEO. P. SHELDON, 
Esq.; Rev. JAMES G. ROBERTS, D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; Mr. JOSEPH WM. 
RICE; Mr. HERBERT M. DIXON ; Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D.; Rev. ROBERT R. MERE- 
DITH, D. D.; Mr. FRANCIS FLINT; Mr. JAMES MITCHELL; Mr. ASA A. SPEAR; WM. IVES 
WASHBURN, Esq., Recording Secretary. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for 

Correspondence. 

Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, and to the Woman's 

Department, may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y, 



DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS, 

In Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders; also Communications relating to the 
business matters of The Home Missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be addressed 
to Alex'r H. Clafp, Treasurer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Post-Office Orders should be drawn on STATION D, New York City. 
A Payment of $50 constitutes a Life Member. 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Clark C Otis, Financial Superintendent, Bible House, New York. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, Work among Bohemians, Poles, etc., Cleveland, O 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, Work among Germans, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandinavians, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Rev. Leroy Warren Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. Edw. D. Curtis Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rev. J. H. Morley Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Franklin B. Doe St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. 

Rev. E. L. Hood Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

Rev. R. A. Beard Wash. Ter. 

Rev. Geo. A. Hood, Ashland, Wis. 



Rev. John L. Maile. Omaha, Neb. 

Rev. Hiram D. Wiard Mitchell, Dak 

Rev. H. C. Simmons .Fargo, No. Dak. 

Rev. C. M. Sanders Denver, Col. 

Rev. W. S. Hawkes Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. J. H. Warren, D.D. __San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. G. H. Atkinson, D.D Portland, Or 

Rev.T. W. Jones, 34 Bible House.New York City. 



SECRETARIES AND TREASURERS 

OF THE AUXILIARIES. 

Rev. JONATHAN E. ADAMS, Secretary Maine Missionary Society Bangor, Me. 

JOHN L CROSBY, Esq., Treasurer " Bangor, Me. 

Rev. EDWARD H. GREELEY, D.D., Secretary, New Hampshire Home Miss. Soc. Concord, N. H. 

Hon. LYMAN D. STEVENS, Treasurer •' " Concord. N. H. 

Rev. CHARLES S. SMITH, Secretary Vermont Domestic " Montpelier, Vt. 

J. C. EMERY, Esq., Treasurer " " Montpelier, Vt. 

Rev. JOSHUA COIT, Secretary Massachusetts Home '■ I 22 Congr. House, 

Rev. EDWIN B. PALMER, Treasurer " " f Boston, Mass. 

Rev. ALEXANDER McGREGOR, Secretary.. Rhode Island " " Pawtucket, R. I. 

EDWIN BARROWS, Esq., Treasurer " " " Providence, R. I. 

Rev. WILLIAM II. MOORE, Secretary Missionary Soc. of Connecticut. Hartford, Conn. 

WARD W. JACOBS, Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. AUGUSTUS G. UPTON, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society... Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " ■• New York City. 

Rev. J. G. FRASER, Secretary Ohio " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " " New York City. 

Rev. JAMES TOMPKINS, Secretary Illinois " " I 151WashingtonSt., 

AARON B. MEAD, Esq., Treasurer " " " \ Chicago, Illinois. 

Rev. T. G. GRASSIE, Secretary Wisconsin " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. A. McCOLLOUGH, Esq., Treasurer " " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. DOUGLASS, Secretary Iowa " " Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. MERRILL, Esq., Treasurer " " " Des Moines, Iowa. 



The ABOC8 Printing Company, New York ani> Jersey City. 



J THE /JoZp/^at^d'. 

Home Missionary. 



AUGUST, 1888. 



i MAGNIFICENT LEAD -181 

RESIGNATION OF SECRETARY 

o-\[T'T<tJ *"* 

rHE CRISIS IN HOME MISSIONS. 185 
REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON 
SECRETARY CLARK'S PAPER. 187 

HELP FROM AFRICA 192 

THE HIDDEN IDOL 19d 

KEPT FOR THE MASTER'S USE. .193 

ADOXOLOGY ^4 

SLAVIC GLIMPSES 19o 

SELF-SUPPORT 198 

ONE MISSIONARY CONCERT. . . .198 

SEED-SOWING. : 199 

REVIVAL NOTES 19 9 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S PRAYER 

UNION 200 

WELCOME POUNDS 200 

WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 201 

The Woman's Meeting at Sara- 
toga—Concluded 202 

My Guide 202 



CONTENTS. 

Our New Bohemian Church 202 

Everyday Work Among the 

Poles 204 

Gathering up the Crumbs 905 

Extra Crumbs 207 

After the Meeting 208 

By the Wayside 208 

From the Green Mountains. . . .209 

Missionary Horse 211 

Very Much Alive 212 

One Gleaner 213 

AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDU- 
CATION SOCIETY 214 

Rollins College 214 

APPOINTMENTS 216 

RECEIPTS 

WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSION- 
ARY SALARIES 223 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 223 
WOMAN'S STATE HOME MIS- 
SIONARY ORGANIZATIONS... 224 
MISSIONARY BOXES 224 



Vol. LXL No. 4. 



NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Bible House, Astor Place. 



SIZTY CENTS A TEAS, IN ADVANCE, POSTAGE PAID. 



ENTERED AT THE POST OFHCK AT NSW TOM, N. T., AS SECOND CLASS [MAD.] MATTE*. 



THE 

HOME MISSIONARY. 

<;<> Preach the GosrEt, Murk xvi. 16. 

How t-ilinll they preach except, they be sent? Rom. x. 15. 

VOL. LXI. AUGUST, 1888. No. 4. 

A MAGNIFICENT LEAD. 

The Central Church, Brooklyn, under the lead of its pastor, Rev. 
Br. Behrends, has set the stroke by which the present home missionary 
crisis is to be met and dealt with. The committee at Saratoga recom- 
mended the appropriation of $100,000 to the new work of the Society. 
Dr. Behrends took this recommendation into his pulpit last Sunday and 
appealed to the congregation for their proportion of this increase. In the 
course of an eloquent sermon oh "Present Christian Duty," he said: 

" Week after week, as we sit in the Home Missionary Rooms, this 
question confronts us. The entrance upon new work in the newer settle- 
ments of this country has to be denied. To keep pace with the rapid 
and steady growth of population we must have more money. We cannot 
go forward. We cannot stand still. To stand still in such a momentous 
period, with such glorious opportunity opening up before us, is to fall 
back. It is no time to lag. If we would make our impress upon the 
future of this country, we must see to it that our institutions of freedom 
are protected by the presence of the church and the school-house, side 
by side, in every settlement in the remote portions of our land." 

The people's response was a contribution of more than $1,000, an ad- 
vance of one hundred per cent, on their last gift to Home Missions. Kot 
every metropolitan church has a Behrends to make the plea, yet one 
earnest effort on the part of each would doubtless witness a similar in- 
crease of home missionary contributions. For country and Christ's sake, 
who will follow this magnificent lead ? 



The Clerical Union, Monday morning spread a net which they called 
a Home Missionary Symposium, in which were caught Supt. J. H. War- 
ren of California, Supt. M. E. Eversz of the German work, Supt. E. D. 
Curtis of Indiana, Supt. T. W. Jones of Pennsylvania, Rev. J. H. 
Parker of Wichita. Kan., and General Missionary Holcombe of Northern 
Missouri. For over an hour the field of Saratoga was fought over again 



182 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

to the delight of those who were detained from that meeting. It has 
been a matter of frequent remark that home missionary superintendents 
seem t® have a real story to tell, and excel in the art of putting things. 
Tap them anywhere, and they are ready and rousing speakers. 

Particularly is this true of Rev. William Gr. Puddefoot ''of the 
United States " facile princeps, on every platform. This designation of 
his field has fallen to him naturally. Just as all the rest of the world 
was starting for Saratoga, Mr. Puddefoot was flying west to celebrate the 
tenth anniversary of self-support in Illinois. Yet he turned up in Sara- 
toga in time for every appointment. And when the tired Saratoga pro- 
pie were toiling home ready for a week's rest, Mr. Puddefoot was bound 
for Washington, D. C, to inspire another great gathering of churches. 
Puddefoots are rare. They have limits of strength and endurance. The 
officers of the Society have been made anxious by signs of overwork, and 
the Executive Committee has voted him two months' vacation, July and 
August, for a visit to his old home in England. He will go, providing 
the money — about three hundred dollars — to cover the expenses of travel, 
can be secured. The funds of the Society are too sacred for this use, 
although it would doubtless be a paying investment. Wherever Mr. 
Puddefoot goes, he will be heard, and wherever heard, will multiply 
givers and friends to Home Missions. Are there not many who in grati- 
tude for the inspiration they have received from his lips, would love to 
help him to this summer outing? Dr. A. H. Clapp, Bible House, New 
York, is treasurer of everything. — Correspondence of The Advance. 



RESIGNATION OF SECRETARY SMITH. 

Rev. Chas. S. Smith, for the past twenty-five years Secretary of the 
Vermont Domestic Missionary Society, has resigned his connection with 
that Society. It has been a long, laborious and faithful service. Wise 
in council, firm in administration, and above all broad and Christlike in 
spirit, Secretary Smith has drawn to himself the confidence of the 
churches and the love of the brethren to an unusual degree. No name 
from the cover of our magazine, and no presence from our Home Mission- 
ary counsels, will be more missed. He still retains his connection with 
the Vermont Chronicle, and there, as always in the past, his pen will be 
used, in behalf of the cause of Home Missions so dear to his heart. 

Rev. Chas. H. Merrill of St. Johnsbury has been appointed his succes- 
sor, and is already in the field. 



Rev. W. Ewdtg of Dakota in a personal letter emphasizes these 
points: " To organize and maintain a good Sunday-school there must be 
some preaching. " 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 183 

ie A denominational school does much to prevent denominational 
strife. A Sunday-school grows naturally into a church. A Union 
Sunday-school ends very often with the formation of two or three 
churches where there should be but one. 

" There are perhapB fifty places in North Dakota in addition to the 
ones already occupied that could be cared for religiously with about half a 
dozen preaching visits per year, to encourage them in their Sunday-school 
work. This arrangement would employ about six men, giving two or 
three days to each visit. This would meet the requirements for only a 
year or two, when the permanent pastor would be a necessity. I could 
organize three tunes as many schools, all in good locations, if the 
American Home Missionary Society could send on the men to follow up 
the tvork.'" 

Rev. TV. TV. Moore, D. D.. in addressing the Presbyterian Centen- 
nial Assembly, in session in Philadelphia in May last, referred to the 
failure of numerous churches to contribute to Home Missions, and said: " I 
am persuaded that the chief reason for this delinquency is the failure of 
the pastors to inform the people of these vast destitutions and to impress 
upon them the paramount importance or evangelistic work. The con- 
tributions of the Southern Church to Home Missions last year varied in 
different presbyteries from one-and-a-half to seventy-seven cents per 
member, and, in the same presbytery, of two churches, not differing 
much as to ability, one contributed five times as much as the other. 
Obviously this is not so much the fault of the people as of the pastors. 
And this shameful inadequacy of means must continue so long as we fail 
to recognize, that for Home Missions as for Foreign, facts constitute the 
strongest appeal, and that facts draw funds just in proportion as they are 
presented." 

Resolutioxs. — The Congregational Church of Tulare, California, at a 
a church meeting held April 11, 1888, passed resolutions expressive of 
their gratitude for the timely help of this Society (and of its Superin- 
tendent, Rev. Dr„ Warren), which was for years essential to its existence 
as a church, — and pledging the church to, at least, an annual con- 
tribution. 

The recent Territorial Educational Association, held in Las Vegas, 
New Mexico, was a most successful meeting, and one that will result in 
much good. The University of New Mexico, at Santa Fe, in charge of 
our missionary. Superintendent Rev. E. L. Hood, has been wonderfully and 
unexpectedly prospered. Last year it closed with nine students. To-day it 
numbers one hundred and five. This growth in the college is a help to the 
church. They have forty-five Indian children in the industrial depart- 
ment, which places 150 students under the care of the college. 



184 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

Another. — My church wheeled into line for the " advance " in 
Home Missions, yesterday. Our offering was the largest ever made hy 
this church for any object. It amounts to 1272, "with more counties to 
hear from." We are very happy over the result. It is a Saratoga echo. 
.Some of the brethren think we shall make the amount 1300. Anyhow, 
my people are stirred upon Home Missions. Thank you for the litera- 
ture. I have flooded the town with it! — Her. II'. B. Hutchins, Ellington, 
CI. Extract from letter. 



This from a Vermont pastor: "Do not hesitate to pour out docu- 
ments illustrative of the work. I have seen quite an amount of mission- 
ary money raised on unpromising soil. It takes Faith, Hard Work, 
Agitation, Patience, Perseverance, and Plenty of Ammunition, — mission- 
ary literature. Will not The Home Missionary devote some space to 
brief articles from many pastors on the question, How to raise money for 
the missionary cause? Let the pastors give their experiences, if they 
have been successful. Will you also for the hundredth time, perhaps, 
remind pastors that the cause of Home Missions should be represented 
at every Missionary Concert? 



The little church at Howard City, Dak., has a membership of 
twenty-five, and a Sunday-school of forty. One of the first acts of its 
new pastor, Rev. I. A. Shanton, was to call upon this church for a gift 
to its mother, the A. H. M. S. The collection amounted to nine dol- 
lars and twenty cents from the church, and five dollars and eighty cents 
from the Sunday-school, making a total of fifteen dollars. That church 
is bound to prosper. How long would it take to evangelize this country 
if our large churches poured their gifts into the Lord's treasury in equal 
proportion, as God has prospered them? 



A Home Missionary finds it impossible to minister to the growing 
needs of his two large fields, ten miles apart, without a horse and buggy. 
His work has been greatly blessed, even under such disadvantages — but 
at what an expense of vitality on the part of the earnest worker ! There 
are six similar cases on our list at the present writing. Young people, 
cannot you supply these missionary horses ? 



We have a few copies of "Songs for Social Worship," by Dr. C. S. 
Robinson — a good book. It would be very helpful, if we could have two 
dozen more copies sent to us, and the gift would be most gratefully 
received. We can, however, use any other book, as we have not the 
necessity laid upon us to be choosers. — Mev. John Yetter, Eldon, Mo. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 185 

THE CRISIS IN HOME MISSIONS. 

The recent annual meeting of the American Home Missionary Soci- 
ety at Saratoga was in several respects a notable gathering. Never 
before have so many friends of the Society come from so many sections 
of the country to testify their interest in its noble work; never before have 
the magnitude and the pressing needs of that work been made so clear 
and brought home so forcibly to the hearts of all patriotic and Christian 
men; never before have fact and appeal united so eloquently to stir the 
conscience and unlock the treasury of the churches. 

There is an element of inspiration in the mere dimensions of such a 
task as that to which the Home Missionary Society has set its hand; it 
may well tax the faith and strength of the Church to face and deal with 
such problems as those which confront this organization. There is 
inspiration in the magnitude of such work, because it is only the great 
need that makes the great opportunity: it is only the great peril that 
develops the great power that conserves and saves. Emerson has some- 
where said that nothing is so perilous for men as that they should live 
secure when they ought to be dying for their country. It is matter of rejoic- 
ing that this vast nation, which must also make itself a great nation if it is 
to be secure, is held face to face with great and imminent dangers that 
force into action the heroism and sacrifice that might otherwise disap- 
pear under the spell of materialism. Nothing could be so disastrous for 
the world as that it should be thoroughly at ease; should go its way and 
live its life, undisturbed by anxieties and untroubled by care. Greatness 
in peoples, as in men, is bred by tremendous struggles, and by achieve- 
ments which are wrung out of the agony of noble souls. It is in such 
experiences that life is saved from becoming mere animal existence. 

Dr. Clark declares that there is to-day a crisis in Home Missions, and 
the facts which he presents show that he is no alarmist. It is a good 
thing for the Society and the churches that there is such a crisis upon 
them; there ought always to be a crisis in Home Missions. There ought 
always to be the sense of great and crying needs, of dangers that make 
us look to our civil and social order, of claims upon our time and thought 
and money that make us mindful of our stewardship. Let us rejoice 
when God draws heavily upon us, because this is the evidence that his 
work is going forward on a greater scale, and demands a larger share of 
human co-operation. These emphatic calls for help serve to remind us, 
also, that the churches cannot spend in barren and worse than useless 
discussions the time and strength which are needed for the very salvation 
of society. For the problems with which the Home Missionary Society 
is dealing do not relate to the church alone or merely; they are State 
problems of the first importance; problems which affect every interest 
and every citizen in the country. The work which the faithful and capa- 



186 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

ble servants of the Society are doing is public work; they are charged 
with responsibilities to the Nation second to none. While politicians 
are clamorous about surface questions, about mere matters of policy, the 
heme missionaries are dealing at first hand with the most fundamental 
things which affect the national welfare and life. The tariff is a small 
matter compared with the question of the Americanization of the hordes 
of foreigners who are already in control in many parts of the country; 
the fishery dispute is a bagatelle compared with the issue between atheis- 
tic materialism in great sections of the country and a civilization which 
shall be grounded on Christian principles and penetrated by Christian 
impulses. The question of the character of a civilization transcends in 
importance all questions of method, policy, and material interest. In its 
dealing with these questions the Home Missionary Society is doing the 
work of statesmanship as well as of religion, and its servants are public 
men in a truer and deeper sense than the great majority of those who 
fill our legislative bodies or sit in the placesof executive power. Such a 
recognition doubtless awaits the men who are now putting heart and life 
into the service of Home Missions. 

As report followed report from the different fields, the impression 
deepened in all minds that this is indeed a critical period in our history; 
that the perils to our institutions from foreign training, from wide-spread 
ignorance, and from a hard and selfish materialism are imminent and 
pressing, and that whatever is to be done must be done at once. The 
Avork is educational, and in all educational processes time is of the first 
importance. The frontiers must be carried now, or they will become 
intrenched against the saving influences of morality and religion; the 
break in the dike must be stopped now or the ocean will be upon us. 
This means more money and more men this year than ever before; it 
means greater zeal and generosity on the part of the churches. These 
will not fail if the churches can be made to Understand the opportunity 
and the peril of the hour. The difficulty is that many of them do not; 
that many pulpits are silent or lethargic because of a lack of information 
concerning the work of the Society. The facts are so startling and con- 
vincing that they carry with them a force more persuasive than eloquence; 
the difficulty is that they do not get a hearing. What is needed is fuller 
study of the field by the ministers, and more systematic and adequate pres- 
entation of the work and needs of the Society to the churches. Mr. Hill's 
suggestion that the Sunday following the anniversary meeting be set 
apart to the presentation of this particular object ought to find wide 
acceptance. The added contribution of $100,000 which the Society 
needs for its work this year will not be withheld if the nature of the crisis 
is clearly understood. The Society cannot stand still; it must go for- 
ward or backward; the moment it fails to advance it begins to recede. 
Movement is the law of its mission, and it can be ma.de only as the im- 
pulse of the churches is behind it. — The Christian Union. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 187 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SECRETARY CLARK'S PAPER. 

PRESENTED BY KEY . RICHARD CORDLEY, D.D., OF KANSAS. 

The paper referred to us is a bugle-cull to the churches. If the 
churches shall bear the call and respond to it, thoy may maintain the 
lead they have secured in borne missionary work. If they refuse to hear 
and to heed, the Congregational churches must retire to the rear and 
cease to be counted among the aggressive Christian forces of the century. 

The paper has two remarkable features : Its clear review of the pres- 
ent situation, and its vivid portrayal of the consequent duty. Its review 
of the situation shows very forcibly how the home missionary idea has 
expanded in these later years. The Home .Missionary Society was once 
called a mere church aid-society. But it has long since outgrown that 
designation, and for years its great effort has been to give the Gospel to 
new settlements on the advancing frontier. It has followed theemigrant 
on his western journey, and has found him in his new home. It lias 
gone everywhere preaching the Gospel. It has crossed the plains and 
(limbed the mountains, and pressed on to the shores of the farther ocean. 
It has followed the trail of the pioneer and the track of the railroad. Into 
the camp of the miners in Colorado, into the camp of the lumbermen in 
Michigan, into the home of ancient civilization in New Mexico, and 
in the home of modern barbarism in Utah, it has gone and preached 
the pure Gospel of the Son of God. This work itself has called for con- 
stant enlargement because the border was constantly broadening, and the 
movement westward every year becoming more rapid. But while the 
western demand has thus steadily increased, other lines of work have 
opened, and other needs have revealed themselves. Not at the AYest 
alone, but all over the country there is coming to be a demand for home 
missionary effort. The rapid growth of cities has opened a new field of 
Christian endeavor of which the fathers never knew. The work is not 
all western, and if we would save our land we must not forget the grow- 
ing desolation at our doors — in our great cities — and elsewhere in older 
as well as newer sections. The change of social conditions demands a new 
adjustment of home missionary forces. The great marvel of this age has 
been the growth of cities. The masses are going to town, and the Gospel 
must follow the people where they go. A new field of home missionary 
demand has been opened, which promises to be as large and imperative 
as the western work has been. 

Then almost parallel with this conies the great foreign demand. 
Half a million of people are coming to our shores every year. All 
of these need to be brought into sympathy with our national life 
and our civilization, and many of them need to be brought into 
sympathy with Christianity itself. The paper on this point is of pecul- 
iar significance, and we need to look more than once to see the full force 



188 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

of this new movement, and the new demands it brings with it.. Here 
is the movement among Bohemians, where it was not only necessary 
to send a gospel ministry, but where it was necessary to create a gospel 
ministry to send. This is a work that only began to dawn ou the con- 
sciences of Christians rive years ago, and now there are two churches, 
many times that number of mission stations and Sunday-schools, with a 
class of young men training for the gospel ministry, and a class of young 
women training for Bible readers among their own people. We can not 
measure what this may mean for the one million of Slavs that have come 
to our shores. The work among Scandinavians is, if anything, more 
important still, because promising larger and more speedy results. The 
Scandinavians are a Christian people. Their sympathies will be with us 
if they can be made to understand us. The effort to bring the more than 
200 Scandinavian mission churches into co-operation and sympathy with 
us is a work of almost infinite promise. The effort to do the same 
thing among our German fellow-citizens is equally significant and hope- 
ful. When we are discussing this great foreign problem we must not do 
injustice to our foreign brethren. A large portion of our foreign immi- 
grants are well disposed. They are loyal to the truth and in sympathy 
-with religious things. But they need to understand and appreciate our 
form of civilization and our form of Christianity. The dangerous classes, 
though very large, are not a majority even among the foreign born them- 
selves. It is a wise policy to win to our own ideas the well disposed 
majority, and they themselves will outweigh and outvote the ill disposed 
minority. The great foreign problem shall then settle itself. The Chris- 
tianized portion shall more than balance the ill favored and the vile. The 
Gospel is mightier than dynamite. The policy of the Home Missionary 
in this regard is the broadest statesmanship. It would prepare the way 
that all the Christian elements of the land, native and foreign, may be 
consolidated in one force. 

This is the spirit in which the American Home Missionary Society 
would meet the masses coming to our shores ; not with suspicious glances 
and repellent words, but with looks of confidence, and words of welcome, 
born of the Gospel of Christ. It would join with all other forces to win 
these people to worthy and intelligent citizenship. It would open the 
way that they maybe more readily Americanized and Christianized by our 
common schools, our common national life, and our common faith. 

But you can readily see how this is enlarging the work of the Society. 
This work has taken on a threefold form, and in each direction is con- 
tinually gaining. The western work was never so large, never so press- 
ing, and never so promising as to-day. But while the western demand is 
more urgent than ever before, these other two departments are coming 
up to co-ordinate importance with it. We see, therefore, why it is that 
with larger receipts than ever before, there was never such difficulty in 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 189 

meeting the call. The work grows faster than the resources, and it not 
only grows but multiplies. New departments of work open and call 
loudly for consideration. And these new departments reveal almost 
boundless opportunity. Every success points to new needs and beckons 
to new possibilities. 

On© of the most interesting portions of the paper before us is where 
the author details the efforts of the management to make their resources 
cover their needs. They sought to reduce appropriations to the churches. 
But here they soon found a limit. The missionaries' salaries bad already 
been cut down to the lowest living point. They sought to cut off super- 
fluous and unpromising work. But close and rigid inquiry showed, that 
with rare exceptions, all the work was promising, and none of it super- 
fluous. To drop any large portion of it would be to abandon what years 
of toil had gained, and to call off the forces on the eve of victory. Tbey 
found there could be no material reduction of grants, and no material 
contraction of work without disaster. All these efforts and many others 
to reduce the outlay and save a few dollars for advance work proved alto- 
gether inadequate. There remained but one thing to do, that was to 
adhere to the order, "No more new work." Xo words ever came from 
the mission house with such chilling effect as these. It took the en- 
thusiasm from our hearts, and the hopeful prospect from before our eyes. 
All thoughts of progress and expansion must be abandoned ; all idea that 
Ave were to go up and possess the land must be surrendered. Xo matter 
how loud the call, our ears must be stopped ; no matter how glowing 
the promise, our eyes must be closed. We could hear but one inexorable 
command — "No more new work !" We could no longer sing, 

"Forget the steps already trod 
And onward press thy way," 

but we could simply stand in the steps already taken. We could only 
hold the camp, — there could be no more advance ; no more new fields Avon ; 
no more daring onsets. We must simply stand behind the intrenchments 
and wait. 

We read now and then in the religious press, and sometimes in the 
reports of meetings like this, the suggestion, that if the Society cannot 
increase its resources it must contract its work. "Let us have fewer 
churches, feAver men, and pay better salaries and pay them promptly." 
I assure you, brethren, this is not the order in which the matter is 
regarded at the front. The editor, sitting with slippered feet before his 
blazing grate, reads of suffering missionaries in Avoods or mountains, and 
he writes, "Call them in, feAA'er men and better paid." We hear no 
such word from the missionaries themseh'es. This is not the winning 
word, this is not the aggressive cry ; it is not the cry that awakens en_ 
thusiasm and stirs the blood ; it is the easy-going cry that would let the 
conscience rest. It Avould say, "Let us not burden ourselves. Let us 



190 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

not worry ourselves. If the work is too heavy for us, let us throw it 
down." The missionary at the front has a different thought. He is 
like the soldier in the field. The soldier appreciates good fare, and good 
tents, and good care. But first of all to him are the demands of the 
service. " Feed us well if you can, clothe us comfortably if you can; 
hut if it must he that you can only give us hard-tack and a package of 
meal in our knapsacks, by all means hurry the reinforcements to the 
front, and press the battle to victory, and win the cause for which we 
are fighting." 

This is the sentiment of the missionaries on the field. First of all 
in their thought, is the work they came to do. They have their trials, 
not a few. Their work is hard, the salary is small, and the trials are 
many. They are not one whit behind God's servants anywhere, in labors 
performed and trials endured. They have gone to the frontier and shared 
the poverty and discomforts of the log-cabin, the dug-out and the sod- 
shanty. Like Paul, they know how to be in want, though few of them 
have ever known how to abound. They could tell many a touching story 
of work and want and weariness. But they have gone at the Masters 
call. They accept these trials as the conditions of their service, and they 
gladly bear them if only the work to which they are devoted may not 
suffer. They would scorn to hold up their trials to excite sympathy in 
their personal needs when the work they are doing should command at. 
tention by its own dignity and grandeur. It is the work they are doing for 
which they are most concerned. It seems a vast and empty region in 
which they labor, but they know into this vast region the multitudes are 
coming, and coming in increasing numbers. 

It is said of Henry Clay that when he first left his Kentucky home, 
and traveled eastward, he climbed the mountains and looked off toward 
the great sea. He stood for a few moments as if listening. Then, turn, 
ing to his companions he said, " I seem to hear the tread of coming mill- 
ions." The missionary at the front hears the tread of coming millions. 
He may be out on the broad prairie, or in the solitude of the mountains, 
but he hears the tread of millions none the less. He toils among scattered 
hamlets, and his congregation gather in little school-houses and cabins 
and dug-outs. But it is not for these alone he labors. He has in mind 
the millions that are coming. Pie knows they are surely coming, and 
they will not be long on the way. He is in the line of coming empires ; 
in the track of destiny; he sees about him a eluster of mighty States, 
each in itself an empire. A few years more and these sparsely settled re- 
gions will teem with busy populations. He wonders what place Christian 
principles shall have in shaping these great commonwealths. Here is 
an opportunity to do a service for his country and his Master which is 
never offered but once. Here is an opportunity to enter and shape the 
beginnings of great States. There may be done now in two score years 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 191 

what two hundred years cannot do later. These States are rapidly assum- 
ing the character they will permanently bear. 

What part arc our Congregational churches to have shaping these 
great commonwealths? What place shall the principles and order of the 
Pilgrims have in the full-grown States that will soon be npon us? Some 
may say, others will do the work if we do not. Possibly this may be. 
Others may hear the call to which we ate deaf. Others may respond to 
the need to which we are indifferent. Bui it was not the wont of the 
Pilgrims to let others go where they were called. It was never their wont 
to lag behind while others pressed to the front. The sons of the Pilgrims 
mast not prove unworthy their ancestry. They must not allow the work 
which belongs to them to be taken from their hands, nor the crown 
which belongs to them to be taken from their brow. May they rather 
feel impressed that they have come to the kingdom for such a time as 
this! 

And we must not think the old-time speed will answer the end. The 
old-time speed will lead us in the rear. Everything has quickened its 
step. And the Gospel must cpxicken its step too if it would keep along- 
side the age. In the olden time men went West with the ox team, and 
everything must "wait for the wagon." Now they go West in the 
lightning express, and all things must follow with railroad speed. In 
1860 the region west of the Mississippi contained scarcely four millions 
of people, and yet it comprised two thirds of the area of the nation. In 
1880 it contained ten millions. In 1890 it will contain seventeen millions, 
and in 1000 it will contain twenty-five millions. It has taken fifty years 
to bring the old West to its present state of advancement. Half that 
time will do the same for the newer West. Where twenty years ago the 
buffalo roamed, now great herds of choice cattle feed. The buffalo wal- 
lows have been turned into corn-fields, and the Indian camping-grounds 
into prosperous cities. The little hamlets of five years ago are now count- 
ing their population by thousands and their traffic by millions. All these 
communities, in city, village, and hamlet call for the Gospel, and the call 
must be answered now. Communities, like men, accpiire their character 
in youth. The early influences of pioneer life are prophetic of the future, 
and become the abiding influences of the after growth. The onward 
progress of settlement will henceforth be more rapid than ever before. 
If our gospel work is not to keep pace with the onward movement, we 
must take our place with denominations which have done their work, and 
cease to be counted as one of the aggressive forces of the republic 

RlCHARD CORDLEY. 

Robert R. Meredith. 
William H. Strong. 
Sidxey E. Bridgmax. 
Henry D. Smith. 



192 THE HOME Ml SSI OX ART. August, 

Dr. Meredith followed Dr. Cordley in similar earnest. He urged 
that no ordinary crisis is upon us. It is also a great opportunity, and it 
is ours. . . . We must not overdo the principle of Christian comity, 
and fail of proper denominational self-respect and activity. ... If 
the executive committee had voted to go on with the new work in sight, 
even by incurring a debt, the churches would have paid the debt. We 
have the money. We show this by giving to all sorts of good objects 
which have no direct claim upon us. . . . Our polity is so divine 
that it does not work easily. We have not the formal organization 
of the Presbyterians or Methodists, but we have a diviner thing, the 
opportunity of showing that love can accomplish more than law. 
Our people still need information, and there should be an ener- 
getic home missionary committee in every conference. 

The needs of the work were evidently in all minds and upon all hearts: 
almost every speaker referred to the subject and urged immediate action. 
Upon one thing all were agreed — that the work must go on. Dr. Cord- 
ley and Dr. Meredith, speaking for the committee to which Dr. Clark's 
paper was referred, made fervent appeals to the churches to furnish the 
Society with men and money; every report from the mission field added 
eloquent facts to these appeals, and the feeling of all present was ex- 
pressed in the resolution reported by the committee and unanimously 
adopted: 

" Resolved, That we have listened with profound interest to the 
paper of Secretary Clark, entitled ' A Crisis in Home Missions;' that we 
appreciate the seriousness of the crisis he describes; that we indorse the 
appeal he makes for an advance of $100,000 as the least that will be 
adequate to the emergency, and pledge ourselves, as much as in us lies, 
to co-operate with the management of the American Home Missionary 
Society in securing the money needed." 



Help from Africa.— Inclosed please find a check for $5, which 
Eev. W. M. Stover of Bailundu, Central Africa, has asked me to for- 
ward to the American Home Missionary Society, to be used in supply- 
ing books or papers to some of your needy pastors. He says he cannot 
send his papers to them, but wants these home missionary pastors to 
have their needs in this direction supplied. I think you will agree with 
me that such a gift from such a source is something out of the common 
course. It will do to be mentioned alongside of the gift of the First 
Church in Bailundu, Central Africa, (#2.21) for the " Morning Star 
Mission."— Rev. E. E. Strong, D. D. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 193 

THE HIDDEN IDOL. 

These people in New Mexico are very idolatrous. One day the 
wife of a young Mexican left him. His mother took a household idol, 
and hid it away in a dark place, promising the idol that when her son's 
wife should come home, it should be released. After awhile the way- 
ward wife returned to her husband. The mother then brought the idol 
from its hiding place, and holding it aloft, danced through the streets. 
She finally entered the house of a friend. The people there assembled, 
immediately knelt before the image, and gave thanks for the restoration 
of the wandering wife. We were permitted, recently, to hold service in 
the house where a little child lay dead. Some of the relatives forbade us 
to sing a hymn, but the grandfather said, " This is my house — they shall 
sing." Afterward the old man asked the relatives how they liked the service. 
They said, " It was very nice." We feel that a point has been gained. 
It is the first time to my knowledge that a Romanist, in this country, 
permitted a funeral service to be conducted by a Protestant. These 
people have been kept in darkness so long, that we find them difficult 
to reach. Very few can read even in their own language. We hope 
much from our schools. When the boys and girls can read good 
English literature, their minds may be molded in the right way.— A 
Mexican Missionary. 



" KEPT FOR THE MASTER'S USE." 

MRS. MARILLA WRIGHT CURTIS, 

Mrs. Marilla Wright Curtis was born at Hanover, N. H., 
December 16th, 1806. She became a Christian very early in life; studied 
at Plainfield Academy, and spent several years in teaching; had an in- 
tense desire to become a foreign missionary, but it was before the days 
when it was considered proper for a single lady to enter a foreign field. 
She was married Sept. 7, 1829, to Rev. Otis F. Curtis, also of Hanover, 
X. H., sharing his labors in a pastorate of nearly fifty years. Six of 
these were spent in Northern Vermont, enjoying a constant succession 
of revivals which in those days were almost an unheard-of thing. But the 
missionary spirit possessed them, and in September 1835, they started 
for the then far West, along weary journey of six weeks by stage, canal, 
and steamer, to Canton, Til. In 1836 they were in Chicago, when that 
city was but a small village, doing pioneer pastoral work there, and 
afterward in Wisconsin, in Kenosha, Racine, Waukesha, Milwaukee, 
Shopiere and Emerald Grove; and later, among the Seneca Indians in 
New York, in Dover, 111., and Avoca, Wis.; carrying with them the 
revival spirit so signally blessed in early days. 



J 94 THE HOME MISSION, I A' 1 \ August, 

As the wife of a pioneer Home Missionary she had a large experience of 
the privations and joys of the missionary service she had so coveted 
all her life. 

She prayed for a son, that he might be a missionary of Christ to the 
heathen; and her first-born, Joseph, dedicated his young life, and studied 
hard to lit himself as a missionary; but God took him, and on his death- 
bed he urged his brother to take up the work that he must lay down. 

It was touching to see her joy as one after another, all her boys made 
choice of the gospel ministry, and afterward of direct missionary service; 
and later on to see several of the grandchildren imbued with like 
spirit. Her sympathies were warmly enlisted in the anti-slavery move- 
ment at a very early day, as well as in the cause of temperance. Of the 
eight children granted them, five are still living, and four were privileged 
to be with her in her last sickness. 

After her husband's death she returned to Emerald Grove, formerly 
their home for thirteen years. Here, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
Louie Manila Chene}', she entered peacefully into rest, shortly after 
twelve on the morning of May 3d, 1888, at the ripe age of eighty-one. 
Her last words were, " Thy rod and Thy staff they comfort me." Truly, 
"many shall rise up to caliber memory blessed." The funeral services 
were held in the new Congregational Church at Emerald Grove, Saturday. 
May 5th, Rev. J. W. Olmstead, of the M. E. Church, officiating in the 
absence of the pastor, Rev. D. B. Jackson. Sermon on the higher alti- 
tudes of Christian experience, as illustrated in the life and death of this 
aged saint. Text, "Ps. li: 10 "Create in me a clean heart, God." — 
Exchange. 



A DOXOLOGY. 



My heart is so full I must speak! For twenty years my wife and I 
have worked in Missouri. "We have toiled right along in the vineyard, 
trusting our Heavenly Father to supply our wants all these days, and 
weeks, and years. But indeed it did look dark, as far as our snpj)ort 
was concerned, a few months ago. Our little church cut loose from the 
dear parent Society, and determined upon self-support. Of course we 
wanted to help, but it has been a hard trial for them, and for us. In 
the midst of the struggle came a tempting call to a field which offered 
a generous salary. Here was an ojien door out of want, into plenty. 
But what about this brave, noble, valiant little band, fighting to become 
a self-supporting church in a great center of influence ? By the help of 
God the temptation was overcome. We decided to remain with oar 
people, and from that hour God's smile has been upon us all, most sig- 
nificantly. Several leading families have come into church fellowship. 
The Ladies' Aid Society has doubled its strength. The subscription to 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 195 

the pastor's salary lias increased. All debts are paid. Church benevo- 
lences have been started. Thanks to helping hands at the East, we 
have safely crossed the line. We are now a self-supporting church. 

In addition to special blessings upon our people, we, personally, have 
had a new and rich experience in gifts from the East. It is simply 
impossible to describe the wonderful box from Broadway Tabernacle, 
\'r\v York. Our every want as a family was supplied to the last degree, 
But what shall I say about seventeen elegant volumes of recently pub- 
lished books of the very highest order! The fact that every book was 
carefully selected by Rev. Dr. Taylor himself, is a guarantee of its 
merit. Some of the larger volumes must have been expensive, yet here 
they rest upon my shelves! Oh, how rich and rare they are! books for 
both the head and heart. I had read reviews of them, but little dreamed 
I should ever see the books. If I am not a better preacher, a more 
spiritual pastor, a fresher sermonizer, great will be my condemnation. 
As to the suits of clothing that came with these books, we dare not 
allow ourselves to estimate the value. And the inspiring letter, which 
added blessed sunshine to it all, we cherish in our family, as some- 
thing sacred. If the clouds ever gather about me again, I will sing, 

"His love in times past forbids me to think 
He'll leave me at last in trouble to sink." 



SLAVIC GLIMPSES.* 

BY PROP. J. LEADINGHAM, OBERLIN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

Our Slavic population is composed of Bohemians, Poles, Eussians, 
and Bulgarians. We have in the United States already over a million of 
them, and they are still coming to us, at the rate of fifty or sixty thousand 
a year. They have a tendency to collect in the large cities, and are to 
be found in the cities from New York to Omaha in numbers from one 
thousand to seventy-five or eighty thousand. Besides these there are 
large numbers settled in colonies in the farming districts of the West. In 
some places whole townships are filled with them. They are almost 
wholly Catholic, at least nominally, except a few Protestant Bohemians. 
There is a tendency among the Bohemian Catholics, however, to 
renounce their religion — but when tliey do it, they usually become 
infidels and atheists. 

Infidel papers and clubs disseminate their pernicious doctrines with 
untiring diligence, and the result is a class of scoffers and haters of the 
truth. To show the character of this infidel press, I quote a few words 
from the Superintendent of the Slavic work. He says: 

" One of the most widely read of these papers, publishes every Sunday 
comic pictures of Bible-scenes, and blasphemous doggerel concerning 
* Extracts from an address at Saratoga, in June, 1888. 



196 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

them. The man who publishes this paper was once a Catholic priest, 
and the pictures he uses are taken from a French publication called 
'The Bible for Few,' the circulation of which was forbidden in Paris 
because it was so bad. How low they become in morals may be seen from 
an incident related by a Polish missionary in Detroit, of a young man, 
who wished to get away from his parents because their lives were so bad. 
One of his brothers had stolen a coat, and when the father came home 
at night, the boy told him about it, and he said, ' That is right, my son; 
if you have not money to buy a coat, steal it.' " 

Five years ago it may be said that nothing was being done for these 
people, at least through organized effort. There were but two Americans 
in the United States who could preach to them in their own language, 
and so far as is known, but three or four native ministers. Since that 
time, the American Home Missionary Society has appointed a Superin- 
tendent to organize the work. He saw at once the need of men to labor 
among them, and proposed to the faculty of Oberlin Theological Semin- 
ary that they open a department in their Seminary for training young men 
of Slavic nationalities for this field. After consideration, the proposition 
was accepted, and in the fall of 1885 the work was begun with two stu- 
dents. Shortly afterward, two more came, making the number for the 
first year four. The next year there were six, and last year (1887) eight. 
For next year, we have four or five more in sight already. The plan has 
been to give them a two years' course of study in such branches as would 
fit them to begin labor among their countrymen at once, and thus to 
hold the field until a better prepared class of men could be raised up. 
They are kept constantly upon the study of the Bible, and instructed in 
the leading doctrines of Christianity. Besides this, they are drilled in the 
•use of their own language in preparing addresses and prayer meeting 
talks. At the same time, their work is made to take on a practical turn 
by sending them to Cleveland on Sundays, where they preach and con- 
duct Sunday-school classes, and visit the families of their countrymen. 

Oberlin is so situated that one hundred thousand of these people 
could be reached every week if we had the men to send. Five men have 
completed the two years' course, and have gone cut to their various fields 
of labor. One is in Detroit among the twenty-five or thirty thousand 
Poles of that city. Another has his headquarters in St. Paul, and does 
Missionary work among the Bohemians of Minnesota. Another is with 
the Bohemians in Iowa. The two who left us this year are not yet per- 
manently located. The work has not been in vain. At least eight new 
Mission stations have been opened, and are manned by these students. 

In Cleveland a chapel was built several years ago by the Cleveland 
churches, in which Bohemian services have been held and a Sun- 
day-school of 500 children gathered. On the 28th of last March, I had 
the pleasure of sitting as a member of a council which organized Bethle- 
hem Chapel, as it was called, into Bethlehem Church. Two days later, 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 197 

a similar church was established among the Bohemians of Chicago. 
Wherever the word of truth is given them there is evidence o* the work- 
ing of the Spirit of God. In Detroit is a poor paralyzed man, who, at 
the risk of personal violence, proclaims his faith in Christ, and reads the 
Bible to those who visit his house. Even the infidel Bohemians can be 
reached when they are approached in the right spirit. One missionary in 
St. Paul tells of an infidel father who was brought to attend church 
because the Bible-reader who was visiting another family living in the 
same house in which he lived gave his children a portion of the gifts she 
had bought for the other children. 

God has given us this opportunity for service, and for our fidelity in 
discharging it I believe he will call us to a strict account. Men for 
the service must be educated. In the case of the men preparing for 
work among our foreign population there is no stated fund which can 
be used for this purpose. The American Home Missionary Society does 
not provide money to educate men. The seminary has no means of 
doing it, and the men themselves can do little — in most cases, nothing 
at all. Some of them, indeed, come to us at a real sacrifice. One young 
man, the son of a Kansas farmer, was, at home, the stay of his par- 
ents in their old age, but when the call came to enter the work as a 
missionary to his people, the old father and mother gave him up, and 
now carry on the farm with the help of their younger sons. 

It is not always easy to find men, but it is harder to find money to 
educate them. If Ave do our duty to these foreigners we must be generous 
of our means. The influences which have been the downfall of nations 
before us are at work here Unlimited wealth has always been fol- 
lowed by luxury, and continued luxury, by deterioration hi morals. One 
danger which threatens us almost as much as the foreign population is 
our wealth, or, at least, the opportunity for acquiring it. On all sides we 
are in danger of being consumed by this desire for gain. The antidote 
for this will be, in spending our money not in luxury, but for Christ. 

When Gideon, with his little band, went out to fight with the hosts 
of the Midianites, he won the victory because the Lord turned the 
swords of the enemy every one against his fellow. Let us take a hint from 
this suggestion. We are threatened by two foes — wealth, and the influ- 
ence of an ignorant and unchristian population. Let us turn them 
against each other. Let us consecrate our wealth to the education and 
evangelization of these people, and we shall destroy the dangers from both. 
The money power would thus Christianize the foreign element, and the 
reflex influence would go far toward Christianizing the money power. 

"The nation and kingdom that will not serve thee, shall perish." 
These are God's words, and I do not believe he intends that any nation 
which refuses to do his will, shall live. If- we refuse, we shall follow in 
the footsteps of Babylon and Borne, and others who have gone before us. 
But "happy is that people, whose God is the Lord." 



198 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

SELF-SUPPORT. 

In reviewing my two years' pastorate lean verily say " Hitherto hath 
the Lord helped me." When I took charge I found a small organization 
of fifty members, and a congregation of ninety. We now have 158 
members, and an average congregation of 400. "This is the Lord's 
doing, and it is marvelous in our eyes.' We rejoice in being able to 
declare ourselves self-suppokting. We offer our sincerest thanks to 
the Society for the generous help afforded, without which we could 
never have achieved such success. We hope to prove our gratitude by 
regular contributions to your treasury, and by earnest prayer that G-od's 
blessing may rest upon the American Home Missionary Society. — Rev. 
/■'. Gwynne, Wilkesbwre, Pa. 



At the Annual Meeting of our church in January, I was called to 
my fifth year of service, and the church voted to assume self-support- 
Both these votes were unanimous and enthusiastic. I cannot express 
m J j°) r ' This little vine, planted and cared for by myself, under Christ, 
with your aid, has become a fruitful one. To God be the gloi-y. How 
long I may remain here, I cannot tell. My relations are of the pleasant- 
est. But if you ever have a hard field that 3*011 think I can fill, com- 
mand me. I should be base indeed, were I not grateful to the American 
Home Missionary Society. Nearly all the preaching I have ever heard 
has been from its missionaries. I should have differed little from the 
heathen to-day, but for its influence. Eternity alone can reveal the 
glorious results of your work. — Rev. A. N. Dean, Cambridge, Neb. 



ONE MISSIONARY CONCERT. 

The subject was "Home Missions." The basis — "Leaves from 
'Our Country/ Illustrated." A local artist enlarged the drawings into 
" charcoal sketches," and the various topics were discussed by addresses 
and papers, for an hour and a half, with absorbing interest. Facts 
were presented, inferences were drawn, appeals were made, a large 
audience was interested, and a new impulse was given to the cause of 
evangelization in our own land. Romanism, Mormonism, Immigration, 
Socialism and Intemperance received special attention, and new light 
was cast on the great evils which the Church of America is required 
to confront and assail. The thing worked admirably in a small country 
church. Others might profitably adopt this rather unique method <?f 
bringing some stern facts before the public mind. — Wilbraliam, 
Mass. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 199 

SEED-SOWING. 

Coming home after a three weeks' meeting at Coal IMuff, Indiana, 
the first thing to greet me was a splendid edition of Webster's 
Uhabbidged Dictionary! This is a blessing which fills a big vacancy 
in my small library. Willie and Emma, who are in the advanced grade 
at school, most fully and gratefully appreciate this gift. They cannot 
stop talking about it. And as though that was not enough to make our 
home happy, we are receiving that most helpful paper, The Sunday 
School Times. We thank God for such friends. You will be glad to 
know that our meetings at Coal Bluff were a grand success. A Congre- 
gational church of fifteen members is the result. There arc many 
others who will soon follow. Some of the charter member's are among 
the leading citizens of the place. The outlook is full of hope. The 
first service of this little church was held in an unfinished hall, with 
planks placed on kegs, for seats. Your missionary preached from these 
words: "■ Then Philip opened his mouth, . . . and preached unto 
him Jesus." We had a precious service. In the afternoon forty boys 
and girls came into the hall, and said, " Give us a Sunday-school !" We 
organized one at once. In the evening the people listened again to the 
truth from the text, k> Behold I stand at the door and knock, if any 
man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will 
sup with him, and he with me." The Lord honored his Word. I do 
hope this mass of people may be reached. All honor to the friends at 
the East, who not only encourage the missionary, but keep him at such 
a post as this. Soon the reaping time will come. — Rev. J. Ha 



REVIVAL NOTES. 



From Ohio. — I came to this place the first Saturday in February, 
and immediately started a protracted meeting. We have had a power- 
ful revival, such as was never before witnessed in this place. The 
church members were first searched and aroused and then i .aicon- 
verted were reached. God grant that the Holy Spirit may come upon 
its in yet greater power' — Rev. T. A. Humphreys, Cyclone. 



Fro . be praised, we are in the midst of a revival. 

All last week our church was crowded at every service. God is granting 
unto us the special influences of the Holy Spirit. Several have found 
Christ precious to their souls, and many others are inquiring the way. 
Evangelist Sayles is with us. He is a rare gospel-worker. The whole 
city is awakened.- -Rev. J. M. La Bash, Pa\ 



200 "Hh HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S PRAYER UNION 

IK AKIZOKAo 

"The members of The Prayer Union for 1887-88 pledge themselves 
until July 1st : 

To daily prayer for their pastor, that the Spirit of God may accom- 
pany his words and work in this community, and for fellow Christians, 
that all may be quickened to more consistent, consecrated living. 

To help sustain the Wednesday Evening Prayer Meeting by taking some 
part therein, either by giving a selected verse from the chapter announced, 
by brief remarks or testimony, by a text, or by a few words of prayer. 

To personal endeavor to bring people who do not attend, to the 
prayer meeting, the Sunday-school, or the Sunday preaching services, 
and to try and lead some they know to love and serve the Savior. 

Feeling my responsibility as a disciple of Jesus, and trusting in God 
to help and keep me, I promise earnestly and faithfully to unite in this 
special prayer and work, from this date to the close of the season." 

This Union which does its work quietly and privately, now numbers 
eighteen members, and is a great help and encouragement to me. The 
outlook is hopeful for the growing up of a goodly number of earnest, 
faithful workers, both among our grown people, and our young people. 
The blessing of the Lord is abiding upon us continually. I feel that I 
appreciate more and more the privilege of laboring in this field. Its 
difficulties do not seem to lessen, but there is more of consecration and 
willingness to serve on the part of Christian people, and that is a joy 
and strength. While this place is more depressed in business than at 
any time since my coming, we think it has reached its lowest point, and 
will soon change for the better. — Rev. H. H. Cole, Tucson, Arizona. 



Welcome Poukds. — Some of my people are very poor, and the 
drought of last season has embarrassed them terribly, but it came into 
their minds a few evenings since to make their pastor a visit. A party 
of seventy arrived at the parsonage, each bearing a pound of something 
that can be used in the house. Following the party were a couple of 
small boys, who, having nothing of their own to bring, picked ujd a scut- 
tle of coal, as their contribution to your missionary and his wife. — 
Minnesota. 



I am delighted with the home missionary leaflets which were distri- 
buted at Saratoga this year. It seems to me there were never so many 
readable and impressive publications upon missionary work as are now 
coming to us from the American Home Missionary Society. — From one 
who reads. 



1S88. THE HOME MISSIONARY, 201 



t&lo man's gcpiivttucut. 



THE WOMAN'S MEETING AT SARATOGA. 
Concluded. 



The following original poem, contributed by a New England woman, 
and a warm friend of Home Missions, was printed upon the programme 
of the Woman's meeting at Saratoga : 

MY GUIDE.* 

" For I, the Lord thy God, will hold thy hand, 
Thy right hand, in mine own, and comfort thee. 
Fear not, for I will help thee." 

This the Hand 
That holds the spheres, and with one boundless sweep, 
Measures the ocean as it were a drop 
Within its mighty hollow; with a span 
Metes out the spreading heavens; counts the dust, 
And balances the everlasting hills. 
And art Thou, Mighty One, to be my Guide ? 
Am I to hold with trembling, childlike grasp 
The Hand that made, that holds the universe ? 
Will not m} r hand slip out, unknown to Thee, 
While, prone to wander in the maze of sin 
I blindly lose the way and lose myself ? 

" For I, the Lord thy God, will hold thy hand 
Within mine own; and I will comfort thee." 

Thy words! my faith rests fearlessly in Thee, 
Since Christ hath sealed my pardon with His blood. 
He knows His own, — they never plead in vain; 
And this my pleading. — If I e'er forget 
To hold the Hand that Thou hast proffered me, 
Then do not Thou let go, but lead me through, 
And when the night comes on, Oh, let me hear 
Through chill and darkness the same loving Voice 
Calling me home. * 

West Newton, Mass. 



*Published by request. 



203 THE HOME 3HSSI0JSTAJST. August, 

The addresses given by ladies were published in the July number of 
this Magazine. We now conclude a rare feast of good things by giving 
some extracts from the addresses of Eev. Messrs. Adams, Eversz, Lewis, 
and Puddefoot. 



OUR NEW BOHEMIAN CHUECH. 
By Rev. E. A. Adam*, Chicago. 

A little more than six years ago we spent our last Sabbath with the 
church in Prague. It was communion Sabbath. As we entered the little 
chapel in the morning, we found its walls covered with paper flowers cut 
by the young ladies of the church, and the platform and chair literally 
covered with a thick carpet of beautiful forget-me-nots. In the after- 
noon, one of the deacons, a carpenter, who had cleared his large shop the 
day before, invited us with the church and congregation to a rare feast. 
After a slight repast, prepared the day before, hymns were sung, the Bible 
read, prayers offered, and testimonials heard. Nearly every member of 
the church spoke, and not a few who were not yet members. And the 
burden of all they said, was this: " I thank God that the Gospel was 
ever brought to me in its purity." Not a few tears were shed, — tears 
they were of gratitude, not to us personally, but to us as having been 
sent to them with this precious: message. 

During our work in Chicago, this last Sabbath in Prague has been 
often recalled. Then it seemed as if no progress was making. We 
remembered that day and took courage, for Ave had no doubt after our 
experience in Prague, that these Bohemians could become earnest, 
devoted, grateful, and loving Christians. Many times have we spoken of 
it, and many times in our family lias the wish been expressed that we 
might see here the things which we had seen among this same people in 
Bohemia. We have not yet seen them. Many hindrances are in the 
way, but our new church is, we believe, the beginning from which even 
greater things are to grow. 

It might seem that among people who are born into the church, who 
insist upon having their children baptized almost immediately after birth, 
and who are shocked at the thoiight of burying their dead without the 
services of an ordained minister or priest, that the organization of a 
church would be a matter or course, with no special difficulties in the 
way. But the fact is, that till these circumstances which seem so favor- 
able are really hindrances. Their longing for the outward forms of the 
church does not at all indicate an inward desire for approach to God in 
these ordinances. ' It is but the expression of their idea that when the 
outward form has been attended to, the thing desired has been accom- 
plished. Of spiritual communion, of change of life, either as acondition 
or as a result of church membership, they have scarcely any conception. 
A heathen, when he hears the Gospel for the first time, feels that its 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONAMY. 803 

prime demand is a change of heart and life. To instill this idea into the 
mind of a formal Christian requires much time and effort. It is not at 
all likely that all the members of our new church are wholly free from 
this error now, but much work has been done in this line and many facts 
indicate that the work has been blessed by God. 

But we rejoice in our new church quite as much from the fact that 
we expect it to be a fold into which we can gather the young whose 
l\et are tending that way, as that it is already something accomplished. 
We feel that among the boys and girls and young people there is very 
much to hope for in this line. The eagerness with which the boys learn 
their verses in order to receive the Bible as a reward and the interest with 
which they read it is a most hopeful thing. If it is, as it most certainly 
is, very sad to see boys of thirteen to fifteen years of age who have never 
heard anything about Abraham, or Moses, or Daniel, it is on the other 
hand, very encouraging to find them not only anxious to read about these 
Bible characters, but also finding in their history, suggestions for all sorts 
of questions concerning practical morality. 

We hope our new church is soon to receive valuable accessions from 
the youth, among whom it is quite evident that the Spirit of God is at 
work. We look to our church to cultivate a true family life among the 
people. There is great need of this. The true Christian idea of the 
family is little known among them. As a church we hope to gather them 
together in a social way and awaken in them desires to have their 
individual families a pattern of the true Church. To do this we need a 
church home. A new chapel with all that would he connected with it is 
a necessity to the development of our new church. And besides we need 
much assistance in the work. 

Among no people does visiting and other Christian work pay better 
than among the Bohemians. Personal contact with them in all sorts of 
ways exerts a wonderful influence for good. I regret nothing so much as 
that my other duties forbid my visiting the people as I wish to. 

We hope to make our church an influence in a wider sense, by means 
of our paper, which will soon, I trust, become a weekly; with a growing 
church behind it, its favor will be greatly increased. But it will require 
outside pecuniary support for some time yet. The need of such a paper 
is not yet felt as it should be. Its advocacy of a Christianity that is not 
formal, its temperance principles, and its maintaining a higher tone of 
character are not pleasing to all the people. 

Our work has been made possible by the help of the American Home 
Missionary Society. Without that help it is difficult to see how the work 
would have been carried on tc the present time; and this help is still 
needed. If Christians to whom God has entrusted wealth could see, as I 
believe he sees it, their opportunity, — they would pour out their wealth 
like water at this time when money is so much needed and will accom- 
plish so much. 



204 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

EVERY-DAY "WORK AMONG THE POLES. 
By John Lewis, Detroit. 
Dear Sisters, Brethren in the Lord, and Friends: — You "heard 
to-day many excellent English speakers, plain grammarian speakers, 
and now I wish you to pay attention to my speech, half and half Eng- 
lish and Polish language; but before I am going to begin to speak more, 
I will tell you that Brother W. II. Davis, the pastor of the First Con- 
gregational Church in Detroit, sends his best wishes to you all; he can- 
not be here present in body, but he is here in spirit with us. 

My subject is, the "Every -day work among Polish people in 
Detroit." My every-day works begins early in the morning, visiting 
from house to house, selling Bibles and tracts, and also reading unto 
them the word of God, and explaining it to them. Some call it preach- 
ing ; if it so, then I preached about over a thousand sermons ; but I do 
not call them sermons, only personal work. 

You heard that Brother Bev. Walker said last night that the 
foreigners are very filthy and dirty. He said a truth. He has had some 
experience in it. I found myself in many places that when I opened 
the door the smell from inside near knocked me down, but the servant 
of God must go in, and make no difference if he is going to be knocked 
down from a hammer or a smell. 

Dear Friends, you must not think that the work among the foreign- 
ers is easy. I am finding more and more through my every-day work 
about their ignorance. I came to a house, and I found a child in a 
cradle crying, and his head was turned near to a hot stove. The poor baby 
was near roasted from the heat of the stove. I asked the mother why 
she done this, and she said, "That child is sick." I told her that she is 
making the child worse sick, because she has his head so close to the 
stove, and she said she did not think that. But she turn the child-head 
from the stove and place the feet to it, and the child was quiet. 

I come to many incidents by my every-day work. I came to a family 
which had a Bible from me. The man and wife read it every morning and 
evening. I asked the man what he think about his Bible, is it right for 
a man to forbid another man to read it ? And he said any man who for- 
bids to read the Bible is not a servant of God, but of a devil. I found 
also that priest who send the dog after me in Cleveland; he is after me 
now in Detroit. I had been telling you, dear Sisters and Brethren, last 
year that the women are bold, more brave than the men, to stand up for 
Jesus, and confess him before the people. I have to tell you again, that 
I found another woman in Detroit, who is not afraid of her people. She 
is coming to the services mostly every time Avhen they are held. 

To this my every-day work I must add some things, so that you may 
know that I am not sleeping there, or eating bread for nothing. From 
last of July, 1887, to June 1, 1888, it is eleven months. I have visited 



isss. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 205 

Lin.") families, preached 36 sermons, lead 46 prayer-meetings, taking care 
of a chapel as a janitor or sexton, from July L8S1 to February L888. 1 
have sold Polish tracts 785, value, $22.31. 1 have given away over 300 
to the poor; sold 15 Polish Bibles, value #K; 31 Polish Testaments, 
value #5.58; 4 English Bibles, value $2; 3 Bohemian Bibles, value, #1.50; 
1 Bohemian Testament, value 15 cents; 15 Bohemian tracts, value #3.70; 
and 2 German Bibles, value #1.35. 

I have spoke once on temperance in a hall in English. Some ladies 
want me to preach temperance to those people, and I said that the Gos- 
pel of Christ is better for them.- Temperance to preach is good to some 
other classes of people, but not to these foreigners. They have to accept 
Christ first. Remember, dear friends, these Polish people; they need 
your help. 



GATHERING UP THE CRUMBS. 

By Rev. W. G. Puddefoot. 

[In attempting to give the address of this gentleman we must be content with a few 
dottings, merely. To tell the honest truth, it is doubtful whether he could report 
himself!] 

The subject given to me, "Gathering up the crumbs," I find a 
most difficult one, simply from a lack of material; — no crumbs in this 
meeting, — more like Liebig's extract of meat. I have been delighted 
with the practical way in which the ladies have worked this meeting. 
How much better they manage than the stuttering blacksmiths that I 
heard of to-day at the dinner table! These two men were working on a 
piece of iron; the head man told the other to strike when he gave the 
word. The time came, and blacksmith No. 1 said, " St-st-st st-rike!" 
The other said, " W-w-w-wh- where?" "Nowhere! You're to-to-too-late!" 
and the iron was cold. Not so with our good sisters, who have practi- 
cally illustrated the use of striking while the iron is hot, by the noble 
collection for Mrs. Pickett's Rocky Mountain Church. 

I am glad the ladies have taken hold of this work of saving our coun- 
try. It is now eight years since I stood for the first time to address a 
Congregational State Association in Michigan. The other speaker of the 
evening was a young Home Missionary, Rev. R. M. Burgess. The 
young man was full of life and hope, and pleasantly alluded to the name 
of his town, which was Bad Axe. He said it was a shame, as the next 
town was Grindstone City, and then he gave an interesting account of 
Ins home missionary experiences. That was but eight years ago — and 
to-day his body lies under the turf, and his young widow mourns for her 
love for whom site waited so long only to lose so soon! I have not time 
to give many illustrations, but this case -is a sample of many, and I 
will try and tell his story in a few words. He commenced his work in 



206 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

Minden, Michigan. He was there through that period when the forest 
fires devastated the country far and wide. He remained unmarried for 
some years, hecause out of his generous heart he had used money for 
other's woes that would have started him in married life earlier. His 
wife was in every way worthy of him, and entered heart and soul into 
the work at Alba. The people were poor, and out of our brother's 
scanty store went money for the church that should have gone for the 
necessaries of life. At times through the winter they suffered from the 
lack of suitable food and clothing; and at last the young wife sold her 
wedding-dress to buy a much-needed overcoat for her husband. In the 
spring a call came to a sunnier clime, and with renewed hope the young 
couide started anew. But alas! pneumonia seized upon his weakened 
frame and although the physican checked it, he was too low to recover, 
and passed to his reward at the age of thirty-six. And now, dear sisters, 
here is but one case of many, and humanly speaking, one that gold could 
have saved. 

Oh, I do not see how a Christian woman can put twenty-five dollars 
into a hat or bonnet to ornament the head, and spend hundreds and 
thousands on jewels, and come back from Europe loaded with knick- 
knacks, and sing complacently, " I love thy Kingdom, Lord," when her 
sister in the wilderness must sell her wedding garment to buy a coat to 
shield her husband from the wintry blast. Don't do it, my sister! you 
will look prettier in a cheaper hat, and feel a thousand per cent, better 
in your heart. 

I have known of a little lady, who was reared tenderly in the East, 
living over a saloon with her husband and three children; rent thirty 
dollars a month — only one room in which a stove could be kept. The 
husband had to cut the ice from a barrel in the hall to get water for 
breakfast, while the little ones were clinging to the mother's dress cry- 
ing, "I'se so cold, mamma! I'se so cold!" Underneath were wicked 
men singing lewd songs, swearing, playing cards, and from morning to 
night the loud guffaw of the drunkard could be heard. Another I knoAv 
whose little ones sleep in a room that is often twenty degrees below zero, 
and even as they sit at meals with the table as near to the kitchen stove 
as they can get it, the thermometer registers zero! And this good brother 
and his wife bundle up the last baby in blankets, and all getting into the 
sleigh, drive two mile6 to church with the air as sharp as stinging nettles. 
What a contrast to the home you live in, sister, with a register in your 
bedroom, a satin quilt on the bed, and an electric knob to summon 
Biddy, with all the luxuries the richest land on earth possesses! I don't 
see how we can hear these cries for help Avith indifference. The ones 
that need help make no complaint, but endure hardness as good soldiers, 
and in the Lord's time will wear the victor's crown. But now they need 
your sympathy; they need your precious prayers, and they ought to have 
of your superfluities, which would be riches to them. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY, 307 

One thing is sure and I must say it before I close; there are many 
lives cut short for the lack of the yery tilings which God's people have in 
abundance; and how we shall stand before the Master when he makes up 
his peculiar treasures, I cannot conceive, unless we recognize in these, 
our brethren upon the Held, The Mast.hu Himself, and help Him 
according to His needs and our ability. 



EXTRA CRUMBS. 



WniLE in Portland, Maine, I was pleasantly surprised at the close of 
the meeting, when a neat, but plainly dressed young man and three 
young women who work in a factory came up to me and modestly 
stated that they belonged to a "Tithing Society," and that they had 
brought their tenth to help on the work. I could not but think, what 
if all God's children gave a tenth? Why, there would be no need of 
my traveling night and day, and worrying good people out of their rest. 
No, no! We could march forward into the waste places triumphantly, 
and with God's help make the solitary place glad, and the desert like the 
garden of the Lord. 

A Gentleman, on hearing a minister say we ought to give till 
we feel it, exclaimed, l< Pshaw! T could carry the whole thing myself 
and not feel it!" I could not help the conviction that if there are men 
who can "carry it all and not feel it," and yet will let a debt hang 
around God's work like a millstone, the time will come when those 
same riches will hang like a millstone around their necks; and when 
those factory girls are glorified saints, and sweeping around the very 
throne, the rich ones of that type will be a million miles away without a 
pin-feather started! — Rev. W. G. Puddefoof. 

We regret that. the report of the earnest words spoken by Superintend- 
ent Eversz is not at hand for this number. From an Exchange we 
copy the following: Superintendent Eversz, who spoke in behalf of the 
Germans in our country, said: "Do not be afraid of them ; go to them 
because you love them ; sec the possibilities in them. Christ did not come 
to us because He was afraid of the evil we should do if left to ourselves, 
but because He loved us and wanted to save us." The general burden 
of our Secretaries seemed to be, the great demands upon us all, as God's 
children, ministers and laymen, to Christianize these millions of for 
eigners among us, and that this is the supreme hour for action — a crisis 
in Home Missions. One speaker said the kindom of heaven was not 
likened to leaven — not at all. The kingdom of heaven was likened to 
leaven which was taken and hid in three measures of meal till all ires 
leavened. So the Gospel must be taken to these masses and diffused 
among them — then God would give increase and fruitage. 



208 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

AFTER THE MEETING. 

FROM A MISSIONARY MOTHER. 

Cleveland, June 12, 1888. 

You will be pleased to learn that we had here a very interesting 
season last Sabbath, it being the second communion of this Bohemian 
church. Their first communion was on Easter Sunday, with fifty-six 
members, all but thirteen of them Bohemians, and one Pole. Last Sab- 
bath ten were added, half of them Bohemians. The services were in the 
two languages, and the singing went well in both. You know the 
Bohemians are a very musical people. I cannot express to you my sincere 
pleasure at being present on that occasion. Having lived for three years 
with my children in Brunn, Moravia, and witnessed their trials and sor- 
rows and bitter persecutions, I thank the Lord heai'tily that He has now 
permitted my son to see fruits of the work in such a church. Oh ! 
that you and the good gentlemen at the Bible House could have seen 
with your own eyes this little church, the first fruits of your labors 
among these Slavic nationalities in this country ! I am sure our people 
who have given to the work, could they also have seen and heard, would 
have been amply repaid for what they have done for these immigrants. 
I am certain that a large blessing is in store for these peoples, and for us, 
if we do our duty to them. Please excuse this letter. I could not help 
telling you how happy and thankful I am to see what I do in this place. 
The prayers and tears of my sainted husband and daughter are being an- 
swered in blessings upon these Bohemians. 

May the gracious Lord strengthen you abundantly for your good work. 
Please remember me very kindly to all the officers of the Society, and be- 
lieve me, your very affectionate sister in Christ, — Mary M. Scliauffler. 



BY THE WAYSIDE. 



Dear Friend, — Having received the package of leaflets you kindly 
sent me only the day before I left home for Saratoga, I slipped them into 
my satchel for companions on my journey. 

A bright, interesting looking young lady of eighteen occupied the 
section opposite me alone. Noticing that she had no reading, I ventured 
to pass over one of my leaflets, taking pains to select one with an attract- 
ive title. She took it and read it at once, and returned it with an expres- 
sion which led me to hand her another ; this she also read. Not wishing 
to seem obtrusive, I went on quietly with my book and did not offer her 
any more. But seeing them lie on my little table, she very soon said, 
"Have you any more ?" when I gathered them all up and handed her. 



1888. THE Ho Mi: MISSIONARY. 209 

Not long after, glancing up from my book, I saw she was busily en- 
gaged with her pencil and note-book, taking down extracts from one of 
the leaflets. Of course I was pleased and surprised at her evident inter- 
est, and felt anxious to understand her thought. Turning to me, she 
returned them all but one, asking that she might keep that a little longer 
to finish copying. " keep it for your own," I replied. 

In a few minutes she was sitting by my side, and we were having an 
earnest little talk upon missionary work. She explained to me that she 
was president of a mission circle in the town where she lived, and she 
was trying to gather materials for her meetings, and to learn all she 
could about methods of work. 

You will be interested to know the leaflet that hud especially absorbed 
her attention was not a story, but it was Mrs. A. E. Arnold's excellent 
and practical one, "Pray, Plan, Pay." It was indeed refreshing to see 
her young enthusiasm and eager desire to learn. It was a real pleas- 
ure to give her some suggestions about pledge-cards, mite-boxes, etc. 
She caught at them, and at once wanted to know where she could obtain 
them. I gave her your address, and told her beside, that The Home 
Missionary would be one of the most helpful and inspiring things she 
could have to read. 

I need not add that I have her address, and shall be happy to remem- 
ber her occasionally with pleasant reminders of. my sympathy and interest 
in her mission work. Very sincerely, — Mrs. C. L. G. — St. Louis, June, 
1888. 



FROM THE GREEN MOUNTAINS. 

At the all-day meeting of the officers and delegates of the Woman's 
Home Missionary Organizations, conducted by Mrs. Taintor, of Chicago, 
a Vermont lady rose and said, "I have been deeply interested in the 
papers and discussions of this royal band of women who represent the 
Woman's Unions of this country. I regret to say that I belong to an 
unorganized State; but personally / am organized" ! This word was 
providentially used to open an earnest discussion among the thirty Ver- 
mont ladies in attendance upon the Saratoga Convention. After holding 
two special sessions, to which they invited Mrs. Taintor, Mrs. Lane, of 
Michigan, and Mrs. Biddle, of Connecticut, they organi zed a Union, pro- 
visionally, to be confirmed and ratified at the State Association to meet 
at Barre, June 12th. 

The next word received at the Bible House, New York, upon this 
movement, came from a Western Home Missionary Superintendent, 
attending the Association, in the following message: "Hurrah for the 
women of Vermont!' They have come into line, and have formed a 
Vermont Woman's Home Missionary Union." 



210 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

Our readers may be interested in further particulars of this event, 
from the pen of " One who was there." 

June 19, 1888. 

I inclose an order for home missionary literature to be distributed 
in our county, for the purpose of opening the eyes and stirring the 
hearts of the women in our Vermont churches. 

Von have without doubt heard that we succeeded in organizing a 
Woman's State Union at Barre, and I must tell you, we have started off 
with as grand a set of officers as you will find in any State ! I have been 
anxious for such a Union for years, and I find that others have felt just 
as I have, but didn't know how to bring about an organization. I had 
resolved, after attending that Saratoga meeting, that our church should 
be a State Union all by itself, if no others would join ! I did want our 
money to go into the work through these grand National Parent Societies, 
who can use it so wisely and so well; and then I do think we ought to 
help our own State Society, which carries such a burden. 

Well, it is done ! and I am glad and thankful. The gentlemen of 
the Vermont Domestic Missionary Society helped us to organize, and 
asked us to assist in the support of a State evangelist, which all seemed 
ready to do. Mrs. Taintor, of Chicago, was with us, and we shall always 
be grateful for her efficient help. 

Last Sabbath our Church Home Missionary Society called a special 
meeting after the Sunday-school to hear a letter from our last missionary 
barrel. I took advantage of the large attendance to report our action at 
Barre, and they passed resolutions at once to become auxiliary to the 
Vermont "Woman's Home Missionary Union ! I guess we are the first 
auxiliary to the new union, and T had the pleasure of becoming the first 
life member. I was so afraid that some one would get in ahead of me ! My 
contribution was the first to reach our treasurer, Mrs. Fairbanks. I am so 
thankful she accepted our nomination. You know a society in Vermont 
wouldn't be complete without a " Fairbanks " on its executive board. 
We are very proud of that St. Johnsbury family. 

I am appointed executive committee for our county. We haven't as 
much money in our corner of the State, but we mean to do as well as we 
can. Is it not a joy to be allowed to help on this glorious work ! I do 
hope that Vermont will make as great advance as Connecticut, Michigan, 
and some other Unions have done. We need to be much in prayer this 
summer, that we may gain strength for a vigorous "Fall Campaign." 

P. S. One word about your new leaflets. They are all excellent. I 
especially like "The Christ Visitor," "Bible Plan of Giving," "The 
Brown Towel," " In the Same Boat," "Is it I?" and " Pray, Plan, Pay." 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 211 

OVERHEARD AT SARATOGA. 

First Lady. — Our Sewing Society wants to make up a box of clothing 
l'<»r a home missionary family; but, 1 declare, 1 am almost discouraged. 
Dr. Coe lias sent me five different families, and not one of them suits. 

Second Lady. — What's the matter? 

First Lady, — Well, one hadn't any children; another had too many. 
We sent for a family of four children, and when the blank came they 
were all boys, and we want to work for girls. 

Third Lady. — I've been waiting six months for a family that will just 
match my family, in size and age, so that I can Bend my own and my 
husband's clothing, and that of our two boys, and three girls. Lvcry 
month I write a letter about it, but so far they have not found me a 
suitable family. 

Fourth Lady {with emphasis). — My good friends, Dr. Coe can't 
make missionary families to order, for you! You ought to get down on 
your knees and pray for grace to beg for the family in greatest need of 
your help! If it is small, take two. If it is large, put into your effort 
more money, more time, more work, and more prayer, and get a richer 
blessing to your souls! 



MISSIONARY HORSE. 



To the Woman's II. M. Union of Connecticut. — I have just 
received your generous check, which is to help buy me a horse. The 
loss of crops here last year cut my salary down very low. Then came 
the long and expensive sickness of my dear wife, which resulted in her 
death. When my horse died, and I was so crippled in my work I did 
not know what to do, I was tempted to believe that God was trying 
to show me that my work in the ministry was done. What poor weak 
mortals we are. How difficult it seems at' times to walk by faith! Xow 
I see that 

" Behind a frowning providence, 
lie hides a smiling face." 

how good the dear Lord is! " Lord, increase my faith." I see he 
has been whispering to his people, and they have obeyed. How we will 
rejoice together when we meet in his blessed kingdom above! Please 
tell the dear donors I am at a loss for language to express my feelings to 
them. I can now get me a horse for the .Master's use, through their 
great kindness. May showers of blessings fall upon you, for your work 
of faith, and labor of love. — Kansas. 



212 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

A WORD TO THE THOUGHTFUL. 

As I cannot attend the meeting of the American Home Missionary 
Society at Saratoga, I send my check towards helping forward the 
grand work. I shall think of that meeting, and pray for a special bless- 
ing upon it. You may be sure of my sincere sympathy. 

How I do wish something could be done at the Woman's meeting to 
influence our Christian sisters to spend less on dress, and devote more 
money to the cause of Him, who, though rich, yet for our sakes became 
poor that we might be rich. Let us leave off the expensive and unbe- 
coming fashions of the day and set a better fashion. It is not pleasant 
for one to stand alone in this matter, and excite remark by assuming a 
singular or peculiar attitude; but suppose a goodly number were to unite 
and discard many of the present superfluities of fashion for a plainer 
attire, I am sure a great many ladies would rejoice to follow such a lead- 
ing. If I knew any of the women of influence, who will attend that 
meeting I would plead with them to plead with the multitude — that we 
might, as women, save more money to lay at the Master's feet this year, 
to carry his blessed Gospel to every part of our land, and the world. — A 

Friend. 

♦ 

From a Farmer's Wife. — The Home Missionary beguiles many a 
lonely moment while shut away in this solitude. I had supposed that 
all the hardship and trials incident to missionary life, were experienced 
by those in foreign lands; but since I began to read this magazine, it 
seems to me that nothing but the grace of God can sustain those who 
are laboring on the frontier of our own country. — Vermont. 



VERY MUCH ALIVE ! 



The false report of the death of Mrs. Drake of Iroquois, Dakota, 
which so startled her friends at Saratoga, has resulted in many letters of 
condolence to Mr. Drake. This missionary wife wishes those who still 
labor under the delusion, to know, that she was "never more alive" in 
her life than now! She has just returned from the " Northwestern Summer 
Institute of Dakota," held at Yankton, and writes: 

" I am tired all over, but the Institute was grand! We also visited 
the Santee Mission in company with Rev. E. H. Carleton and wife. We 
hired a team together and drove thirty miles. We crossed the Missouri 
on a horse ferry opposite the Mission. The river was so high that the 
boat could not land. They stopped within a few rods of the shore, took 
the horses from the wagon, and lifted it out into the water, jumped the 
horses out after us, waded out and harnessed them again to the wagon, 
and we rode to the shore. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. ' 213 

"We had a delightful time at the Mission. It was interesting to see 
the intelligence of these Indian pupils, many of them fine looking. A 
number graduate this week and go home to become missionaries to their 
own people: and they are fully qualified to do this. They are taught 
all sorts of trades, too. We visited their shops, and a scraper made by 
these Indians now adorns our front door-step. 

"When we attempted to cross the big, muddy stream, on our return, we 
found the wind so high and the river on such a 'general rampage' we 
could not cross; so we drove down the Nebraska side, over bluffs, and bad 
roads, and finally reached the landing opposite Yankton Saturday night 
just in time to lose the ferry. We drove back four miles to Aten, where 
we were obliged to spend the Sabbath. The Lord's hand was in it, for 
there had been no meetings here for two years. The former minister had 
arrived and we had four services that day. I never saw people so gospel- 
hungry. We each preached. Four rose for prayers, one was converted, 
and several backsliders were reclaimed. It was a precious season. The 
hotel keeper wouldn't take a cent for our board, or that of our team; — 
said he ought to pay us for coming. How good God is !" 



A Picture Book. — We want to thank the giver for that beautiful 
book sent to our children. There is no book-store, such as you have in 
Xew York and Boston, this side of the Mississippi River. We miss 
many such rare treats that those who live in the East continually enjoy. 
Perhaps on this account we doubly appreciate the thoughtful kindness 
of those who remember us in this way. — Rev. H. J. Taylor, Anacortes, 
Fidahju Island, W. T. v 



ONE GLEANER. 



"It is not an easy thing," says the lady delegate from Missouri to 
the Saratoga meeting, "to transport the perfume of a flower a thousand 
miles. Nevertheless, it was an earnest, wide-awake meeting from be- 
ginning to end, and one which ought to carry its influence a whole year, 
at least. Delegates were there from almost every State in the Union, 
each charged with a fire from above, and a zeal that is born of God. 
Self-denying missionaries were there from the frontier, with thrilling 
stories of actual experience which stirred our souls to their very depths. 
Warm friends of Home Missions were there . who went away from the 
meetings warmer friends still — resolved to do more, and give more, and 
pray more for Home Missions than ever before." 

This extract from The Congregational Life, voices the senti- 
ment of every delegate, as it has been expressed through pri- 



214 THE HOME MISSIONARY August 

vate letters and public reports. The well-known pastor at New 
London, Ct., gave a generous portion of the "Friday evening 
hour" following the Saratoga Convention, to his wife, who 
presented to an attentive and deeply interested audience a full account 
of the ladies' meetings of the Convention. Among other pleasant allu- 
sions to the exercises, she said : "The reports and papers of women are 
said to contain, too often, a great amount of gush, and effort at rhetorical 
effects, but we had proof at these meetings that woman is learning to 
give her wise and helpful thought to the public, clearly, and simply, and 
so as to be heard. The speakers on this occasion were not afraid to make 
the effort to be heard, and, although tbe Wednesday afternoon meeting 
was held in the largest church, containing an audience of some fifteen 
hundred, their voices were clear and distinct, so that even in this regard 
the meeting was a great success. 

" We noticed a number of men in the audience. This certainly is an 
advance upon meetings where the other sex is carefully excluded, or only 
admitted to arrange seats or open windows. But these ladies were like 
Deborah, who called upon Barak to deliver the land, and ivho went up 
with him." 

After reproducing the most interesting part of each address, this 
thorough gleaner closes her story with these words : "No one can attend 
the meetings of the American Home Missionary Society without expe- 
riencing a deepened interest, not merely in the work of this society, 
but in all Christian work, and a desire to have some share in it." 



American t&oXltQc nmX %&\xvxtion Jwcicig. 

Rev. John A. Hamilton, D.D., Secretary. 
Rev. Theodore Y. Gardner, Western Secretary. 
James M. Gordon, Esq., Ireasurer. 
10 Congregational House, Boston. 

[Money for the Society may be sent to James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer, No. 10 
Congregational House, Boston ; or to Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., 34 Bible 
House, New York.] 

ROLLINS COLLEGE. 

FROM THE FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS OF THE 
AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

There has been satisfactory growth in the work of Rollins College 
during the year. On account of better provision for the education of 
children in the community the Training Department has been discon- 
tinued. In the Preparatory and Academic Departments there have been 
eighty-three pupils, a gain upon the previous year of twenty-nine. Tbe 
Grammar School is doing necessary sub-preparatoy work and has had 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 215 

forty pupils. In college we have had a Sophomore class of two. We 
report a total of one hundred and twenty-five for the year. The home 
life in the cottages and Boarding Department has been managed to the 
universal satisfaction. The orderly conduct of the students is worthy of 
grateful mention. The religious atmosphere has been more marked than 
before. The Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor in the place 
has had a large representation from the institution. 

The Visitors of the General Congregational Association of Florida, in 
their annual report to the Association, say: "Work now being done in 
the Preparatory Department is college work in many Northern colleges. 
The deportment observed on the play-ground and streets, in the class- 
room and cottage, was admirable. The Boarding Department seemed to 
be managed admirably. Unquestionably Rollins College is and ought to 
be the right hand of this Association and of the Florida Home Mission- 
ary Society, and a leading force in all moral and religious progress on this 
peninsula." 

Rev. Zachary Eddy, after a visit of inspection, wrote: "I believe 
that Rollins College is one of the most precious boons which the North 
has bestowed upon the South. From its organization Florida will reckon 
the era of its intellectual and religious regeneration." 

Rev. A. E. Dunning, D.D., after a careful examination of the insti- 
tution, wrote to the Congregationalist : "Rollins College has a noble 
corps of teachers, living on very small salaries. It has a great work to do 
for this wonderful State, and has begun to do it worthily. No college 
with which I am acquainted more needs generous gifts or can use them 
to greater advantage." 

During the year A. W. Rollins, Esq., has died. He was one of the 
founders and a member of the Corporation from the beginning. The 
institution was named after him. He gave the Lord's money towards 
these foundations of Christian education. This is not an exception. 
The work has been builded by consecrated means. God is accepting the 
gift. This annual meeting lacks something. This winter lacks muck 
All this life and work are associated in our minds with the friend and 
fellow-worker who has gone. He has left us in the hope of immortality. 
The peace of that hope was within him as he heard the Master's call. 
We are a Christian body of men. We administer a Christian trust. Shall 
we not give it anew to Christ, and ourselves anew to him in this work? 
Then shall the year to come, and the years for many generations, be 
fruitful in this Southern service in the Master's name. 

There is imperative need of funds. We are making an effort to 
secure one hundred subscriptions of one hundred dollars, each annually, 
for five years, that the present need may be relieved and that we may 
meanwhile turn to the work of permanent endowment. Ten of these sub* 
ecriptions have been secured. 



216 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



August, 



&ppQixx\xxxm\s it* gtttue, 1888. 



Not in commission last year. 

Abbott, Ephraim E., Sierra Mad re, Cal. 
Mechtersheimer ? George, Modesto, Cal, 
Nordstrom, David, Rush City, Minn. 
Van Ommeren, Hendrick, Andrews, Ind. 

Re-commissioned. 

Adams, Edwin A., Chicago, 111. 

Andrews, David W., Hobart,Ross and Ainsworth, 

Ind. 
Bailey, James G., Rogers, Ark. 
Bement, Horace H. , Vestaburg and Ferris, Mich. 
Bixby, Alanson, Sweel water, Minn. 
BrainerdjEdward R., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Brearly, William II. , Colvin and Jasper, So. Dak. 
Carter-Elijah, Dawson and Madison, Minn. 
Cash, Elijah, Eagle Rock, Edgemont and vicinity, 

Cal. 
Champlin, Oliver P., Rushford and vicinity, Minn. 
Childs, Truman D., Fowler City, Crooked Creek 

and Montezuma, Kan. 
Claflin, Arthur H., Sheridan and out-stations, 

Mich. 
Colcord, Daniel H., Monrovia, Cal. 
Colwell, Henry J., Grand Meadow and Dexter, 

Minn. 
Cooper, James, Severy, Western Park and Green 

Valley, Kan. 
Crawford, Sidney, Tampa, Fla. 
Davis, Charles H., Perris, Cal. 
Davis, David L., Carbondale, Penn. 
Delzell, Samuel W., San Jacinto, Cal 
Drew, James B., St. Paul, Minn. 
Evans, Charles, Cardonia, Ind. 
Fordney, Daniel L., Cole Camp and Twin Springs, 

Mo. 
Foster, Jesse D., San Bernardino, Cal. 
Frame, Ezra E., Buffalo Gap, Dak. 
Frazee, John H., Knoxville, Tenn. 
Goodsell, Dennis, Westminster and out-stations, 

Cal. 
Gordan, Isaac G., Scappoose and out-stations, 

Or. 
Hall, George C, Astoria, Or. 
Hayes, James, Coal Bluff, Ind. 



Horst, George, St. Louis, Mo. 

Howell, Edward B ,Mojave, Cal. 

Hullinger, Frank W., Windsor, Mo. 

Huntington, John C, Pelican Rapids, Minn. 

Jenkins, David T., Lusk, Wyo. 

Jenkins, Josiah H, Mt. Dora, Fla. 

Jennings, Samuel J., Big Horn, Sheridan, Becton, 

and Prairie Dog, Wyo. 
Jones, Fred V., Almena, Kan. 
Jones, James V., Osage City, Kan. 
Jones, John, Coolville, Ohio. 
McCunn, Drummond, Hesperia and Victor, Cal. 
McDuffle, Samuel V., Orange City, Fla. 
McNeill, Samuel M., Sleepy Eye and out-station, 

Minn. 
Markham, Reuben F, Kirwin and out-station, 

Kan. 
Marlow, Richard T., Iberia and Unity, Mo. 
Minich, Daniel EL, Gritzland and Rotate, Kan 
Nagel, John, Fresno, Cal. 
Peterson, Mathias, Clear Lake, Star Prairie, New 

Richmond, Shell Lake and Richardson, Wis. 
Phillips, John H., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Rexford, George W., Armour and out-station. 

So. Dak. 
Richards, Emanuel, Buffalo Park, Collyer and 

Grinnell, Kan. 
Richards, Samuel, D.D., Riverdale, Mo. 
Schram, George A., North St. Paul, Minn. 
Seccombe, Charles, Springfield, Running Water 

and Loretta, So. Dak. 
Sherwood, Nathan M., Jersey City, N. J. 
Smith, J. H. B., Jetmore, Harold and Houston 

Kan. 
Starr, Michael A., Escondido, Cal. 
Steel, William, Stephen and Donaldson, Minn. 
Tenney, Marcus D., Neosho Falls, Geneva and 

Vernon, Kan. 
Tuthill, Edward B., San Miguel, Indian Valley 

and Monroe District, Cal. 
Welch, Moses C, Pomona, Fla. 
Wilde, James, Scatter Creek, Center Ridge and 

Mound Valley, Kan. 
White, Austin B., San Diego, Cal. 
Wurrschmidt, Chr. W., Gen'l Miss, work in So. 

Dak. 



gtecjeipts xxx %xxxxz t 1888. 



MAINE— $403.08 ; of which Legacy, 
$300.00. 

Bangor, Central Ch. , by W. S. Dennett $25 00 
Brunswick, Anonymous, for Mo. Pelt 

Fund _. 5 00 

Gorham, Legacy of Mrs. Mary H. 

Tyler, by Mrs. L. Hunt 300 00 

First, by J. S. Leavitt, Jr 28 08 

Hampden, Cong. S. S., by C. F. Linna 12 00 

Rockland, by E. M. Stubbs 18 00 

Rockport, Mrs. H. M. Gulliver 5 00 

Waterford, First, by J. S. Plummer. .. 5 00 
West Trenton, Mrs. A. K. Thompson, 

by J. L. Crosby, Treas. Maine Miss. 

Soc 5 00 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— $46.59. 

Antrim, Mrs. M. W. Holman $10 00 

Concord, A Friend 5 00 

Franklin, by Rev. D. McC. Kelsey 5 59 

Hazen's Mills, A Friend 10 00 

Hollis, AFrdend 5 00 

Sanbornton, by A. Moulton 9 00 

Warner, Mrs. A. G. H. Eaton 2 00 

VERMONT— $336.84. 
Received by J. C. Emery, Treae. 
Vt. Dom. Miss. Soc: 

Barnet, S. S $17 85 

Springfield, A Friend 1 00 

Woodstock, Mrs. S. A. Walker 1 00 

Mrs. L. A. Judd 2 00 

21 85 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



217 



Manchester, Oh., $21.99; Miss Ellen 
Hawley, $20; S. G. Cone, $25, by 8. 
O. Cone 

Middlebury, Mary Mathews 

Springfield, by B. F. Aldrich 

MASSACHUSETTS— $9,105.41; of which 
Legacies, $8,606.00. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc., by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas 

By request of Donors, special _ 

For work among Foreigners in the 

West 

Acushnet, New Bedford, First Ch. , by 

ROT. 8. C. Bushnell 

Amherst, South Ch., by J. E. Merritt. 

"The King's Daughters," special, by 
Miss Annie L. Fanley, Treas 

W. M. Graves, $10; A Friend, $15, 
by \V. M. Graves 

J 

Athol, F. C. Parmenter 

Boston, A Friend, special 

Boxford, First, by J. Sawyer 

Dorchester, Mrs. J. II. Means, special 
East Bridgewater, Union Ch., by G. M. 

Keith 

Fitchburg, Mrs. E. G. Tobey.. 

Gloucester, Mrs. N. E. Brooks 

Hadley, Kussell Ch 

Lee, A Friend, special 

Lenox, by E. Barrett 

Medford, Rev. J. L Hill 

Merrimac, Mrs. S. B. Sawyer 

Milton, Mrs. E. E. V. Field 

Natirk, First, by R. H. Randall 

Newburyport, from a S. S. Class in the 

North Ch., by Ann P. Bassett 

Three Friends, for Mo. Pelt Fund... 
North Belchertown, Woman's Miss. 

and Benev. Soc, by Mrs. R. Harmon, 

of which $4, for Work in Utah 

Northborough, Mrs. H. B. Day 

Oxford, Legacy of Mary De Witt, with 

interest, by W. Newton and C. A. 

Angell, Exs _ 

Pittsfield, A Friend, for Children's 

Bohemian Fund 

Rev. E. Strong, D.D., $20; Mrs Ed- 
ward Strong, to const, herself a L. 

M.,$50._ 

Quincy.J. H. Wheble 

Soiuh Egremont, Cong. S. S., by £. 

W. Ward 

Springfield, Miss Carrie E. Bowdoin, 

in full, to const. Miss Gcorgiana. 

Moore a L. M 

Stockbridge, A Lady Friend 

Tewksbury, by E. Foster 

Webster, by Rev. H. C. Simmons 

Western Massachusetts, special for the 

German Sem. at Crete, Neb 

Whitinsville, Miss Annie L. Whitin, 

special _ 

Wilkinsonville, Legacy of W. R. Hill, 

by E. B. W. and C. W. Hill, Ex's... 
Worcester, Salem Street Ch., by E. 

Tucker, Jr 

W. H. Sawyer 

J. L. W 



1.25; of which 



RHODE ISLAND— $1,8 

Legacy, $1,805.00. 

Bristol, First Ch. add'l, by P. Skinner, 
Jr 

Providence, Legacv of Anthony B. 
Arnold, by J. H. Cheever, Ex. 

CONNECTICUT— $6,441.46, of which 
Legacy, $5,250.00. 

Received by F. T. Jarman: 

New Haven, United Ch $203 40 

North Haven, E. Dickernian. 2 00 



$(16 99 

1 00 

247 00 


500 00 
75 00 


4,500 00 


97 89 
7 00 


40 00 


25 00 
1 00 

io oo 

25 00 
52 18 
5 00 


8 41 

8 oo 
10 00 
24 20 

1 00 

47 00 

10 00 

40 

5 00 
300 00 


5 00 
15 00 


8 33 
5 00 


506 00 


2 00 


70 00 

1 00 


10 00 


10 00 

5 00 

22 00 

16 00 


100 00 


100 00 


2,000 00 


42 00 

500 00 
1 00 


3 25 


1,805 00 


$205 40 



Received by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Union: 
Fairlleld, Aux., Mrs. J. A. 

Kippen, $1; A Friend, $1... $2 
Sufncld, Young Ladies' It. If. 

Circle, special 10 00 

$12 00 

Bethlehem, The Willing Helpers, by 

Mrs. S. P. Hayes, for Children's 

Bohemian Fund _ 100 

Bloomlleld, by E. B. Rowley 15 00 

Bridgeport, C. M. Minor, special, for 

the German Sem. at Crete, Neb 10 00 

Bristol, byE. Peck 129 14 

Cheshire, J. L. Foote 10 00 

Chester, A Tenth 10 00 

Colchester, Mrs. C. C. Destin, for 

"The Mo. Pelt Fund" 1 00 

Connecticut, A Friend 100 00 

Green's Farms, by S. B. Sherwood 53 50 

Greenwich, Second, by L. P.Hubbard 31 72 

A. 100 00 

Hadlyme, byB. E. ilungerford 4 00 

Hartford, Mrs. L. C. D. 100 00 

Litchfield, A Friend 5 00 

Middletown, Legacy of Mrs. Jane 
Hubbard, by Miss S. C. Clark, Ex. 5,260 00 
South Cong. S. S. $50; Mrs. Ann 
Crittenden, $5, by E. Payne, for Sal- 
ary Fund 55 00 

Good Will Soc. in the South Ch., by 

E. Payne for Salary Fund 10 00 

New Haven, First Ch., by P. S. Brad- 
ley 152 45 

Ladies' H. M. Soc. First Ch., by 

Miss E.C.Bradley, for Salary Fund. 114 00 
Yale University Chapel, add'l, by L. 

E. Osborn 24 00 

Mrs. L. H.Eastman, special 1 00 

Newington, Ch. and S. S., for Child- 
ren's Bohemian Fund, by Rev. J. O. 

Barrows 15 00 

Plainvillc, A Friend, in full, to const. 

Willie Ensign a L. M 12 50 

Sharon, Mrs. O. Brazee 75 

Simsbury, P. G. Clark, for Scandina- 
vian Fund _ 1 00 

Stratford, A Friend, for "The Mo. Pelt 

Fund" 2 00 

Watertown, W. S. M 5 00 

Windsor Locks, by Mrs. J. H. Goodell, 
"The Children," for " The Aunt 
Nabby"Fund 11 00 

NEW YORK— $5,786.19; of which Leg- 
acies, $170.87 

Received by Rev. A. G. Upton: 

Baiting Hollow $2 25 

Black River and St. Lawrence 

Assoc 87 79 

Little Valley 5 00 

Mousey 5 00 

Morrisville 7 55 

$107 59 

Received by Rev. F. V. D. Gar- 

retson: 

LeRaysville ..$15 00 

Potterville 2 43 

Rochester 27 32 

44 75 

Brooklyn, Ch. of the Pilgrims, balance 

of coll., by J. P. Dike 50 00 

Central Ch., of which from A. Al- 
ford, $13 ; by J. H. Pratt, in part.. 948 39 

South Cong, Ch., by E. D. Ford 100 00 

A Friend, $10 ; Elsie and Howard 
Strong, for "Mo. Pelt Fund," 60c. 10 60 

Buffalo, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First 

Cong. Ch., special, by W. H. Grein. 5 00 

Cambria Center, Cong. S. S., by C. F. 

Comstock 15 00 

Farmiagville and New Village, by 

Rev. F. A.Valentine 2 00 

Gouverneur, Legacv of Mrs. Janet Or- 

miston, by T. A. Turnbull, Ex 26 67 



218 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



August, 



Lewis and Wadham's Mills, by Rev. 
A. R. Crawford 

New York City, Final dividend on ac- 
count of Legacy of John Hancock, 

by Rev A. S. Walsh... 

Isaac E. Smith, $3 500; A Friend, 
$200; Rev. F. V. D. Garretson, $25 

Norwich, Ladies of the Cong. Ch., by 
Mrs. R. W. Barber, in full, to const. 
Mrs. Harriet N. Gibson a L. M 

Saratoga Springs, Coll. at Meeting of 
Officers Woman's H. M. Union, for 

expense of printing 

Coll. at Meeting of the Woman's H. 

M. Soc. for Mrs. J. W. Pickett's 

Rocky Mountain work, special... 

From a Friend of Home Missions. . . 

A Foreign Miss'y interested in the 

Home Work, special. 

C. B. S., for Mo. Pelt Fund 

Schenectady, by Rev. J. H. Munsell.. 

Summer Hill, by Rev. C. H. Curtis... 

Westchester, A Friend... 

Wilmington, by Rev. D. Fish 

NEW JERSEY— $678.45 

Bloomfield, M. E. Coe._ 

Chatham, Stanley Ch., by Rev. R. S. 
Stone. 

Closter, by Rev. G. W. Plack 

Montclair, First Ch., by F. T. Bailey, 
$235.45; Rev. A. II. Bradford, $10; 
C. W. Sweet, $100; C. S. Noyes, $15: 
$350.45; First Cong. S. S., by T. H. 

Bouden, $100 

Ladies' H. M. Soc. of First Ch., 
add'l, by Mrs. J. J. Cooper 



ARKANSAS— $5.00: 
Rogers, Rev. J. G. Bailey 



44 20 
3,725 00 

27 05 

18 20 



451 25 
25 00 

20 00 

5 00 
40 00 

6 51 
2 00 
2 23 



PENNSYLVANIA— $504.87; of which 
Legacy, $475.00. 

Philadelphia, Avails of Legacy of 
Elizabeth H. Pratt, by J. McG. Gibb, 
Adm 

Potterville, by Miss L. M. Cook 

Ridgeway, First, by W. 11. Osterhout. 
Slatington, by Rev. W. H. Jones 

MARYLAND— $261.56. 

Baltimore, First Ch., by M. Hawley... 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $71.00. 

Washington, Tabernacle Ch., add'l, 

by W. C. Scofield 

Ladies' H. M. Soc. of First Ch., for 
Salary Fund, by Miss Lizzie Pat- 
terson 

VIRGINIA— $6.59. 

Falls Church, by Rev. F. W. Tucker- 
man. _ 

SOUTH CAROLINA— $3.00. 

Spartanburg, Mrs. W. B. Hallett 



FLORIDA— $43.57. 

Daytona, Woman's H. M. Soc, by 
Mrs. L. C. Partridge 

Interlachen, by Rev W. D. Brown 

Norwalk and Kerr City, by Rev. B. T. 
Stafford 

Pomona, by Rev. M. C. Welch 

Tavares, by Rev. A. T. Clarke 



5 00 


5 00 
8 00 


460 45 


200 00 


475 00 
7 87 
17 00 
5 00 


261 56 


1 00 


70 00 


6 58 


3 00 


5 00 


10 00 
16 00 


2 50 

3 56 
11 57 



TEXAS— $20.00. 

Cleburne, by C. W. Mertz.. 

Shafter, Mrs. Emily Noyes. 

TENNESSEE— $9.00. 



Chattanooga, Contents of a Miss'y 
Box, special, by Mrs. A. S. Steele... 

Nashville, B. S." S. class in the Fisk 
University, by E. C. Stickel 

OHIO— $864.56; of which Legacy, $50.00. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Frazer: 
Chardon, by Rev. T. D. Phil- 
lips $10 66 

Mantua, by Rev. J. C. Chap- 
pie 5 70 

Received by Rev. R. Qnaife, from 
Churches "and Individuals in Ohio, 

$115.49 and $33. 19 

Received in May, by S. P. Churchill, 
Treas. Bohemian Board, Cleve- 
land: 

Cleveland, A Friend. $100 00 

First. Y. P. S. C. E 6 50 

Jennings Ave. Ch.... 25 00 

Received by Mrs. Crafts, 
Treas. O. W. H. M. U.: 
Elyria, First, Ladies' 

H. M. Soc $5 00 

Oberiin, First, L. A. 

Soc 25 15 

30 15 

Wayne 12 00 

Huntington, West Va., S.S.. 3 00 



Received by Mrs. Phebe A. 
Crafts, Treas Ohio Woman's 
II. M. Union: 

Akron, Ch., W. H. M. S $20 00 

Cleveland, First, Y. P. S. 

C. E__ 3 14 

First, Boys' and Girls' Mis- 
sion Band 63 

Columbus, Eastwood Ch., W. 

M. S - 25 00 

Medina, Ch., W. 11. M. S.... 10 00 
Steubenville, First, W. H. M. 

S 5 00 



Ashtabula, by Rev. J. B. Davison 

Cleveland, Jennings Ave. Ch., by C. 
E. Waite.... 

Mansfield, Ohio H. M. Soc. First Ch., 
byE. B. Caldwell 

Nelson, Legacy of Mrs. Mary A. Ful- 
ler, by C. C. Fuller.. 

Oberiin, H. A.Deming, in full, to const. 
II. A. Deming a L. M 

Perrysburgh, S. T. Tolman._ 

Toledo, Mrs. N. M. Landis, for " Mo. 
Pelt Fund." 

Wauseon, by S. J. Clark 

INDIANA- $29. 68. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis: 

Bremen $4 02 

Dea. J. J. Wright 2 00 

South Vigo 3 00 

Ancola, Ladies' Miss. Union of Cong. 

Ch., by Rev. F. E. Knoff 

Hammond, by Rev. W. W. Lineberry. 
Ontario, by Rev. J. R. Preston 

ILLINOIS— $48.30. 

Bloomington, A Friend 

Chicago, Leavitt Street Ch„ by W. R. 

Townsend 

Rev. E. A. Adams 

East Paw Paw, Mary E. Breed 

Ivanhoe, Mrs. S. Sanford 



$15 00 
5 00 



5 00 
4 00 



16 36 
148 68 



176 65 



63 77 
5 88 

30 00 

327 17 

50 00 

25 00 
5 00 

300 
13 05 



9 02 

5 00 
4 00 
11 66 



11 15 

26 75 

5 00 

5 00 

40 



isss. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



219 



MISSOURI— $57.21. 

Received by Mrs. A. E. Cook, Treae. 
Woman's II. M. Soc: 

Eldon, L. H. M. S $5 (X) 

Lamar, L. H. M. 8 1 00 

Springfield, L. II. M. S. of 

First Ch. 1 00 

Webster Groves, L. H. M. S. of 

Cong. Ch 10 00 

$17 00 

Hannibal, by Rev. G. T. Holcombe... 5 50 
St. Louis, Mrs. C. L. Goodell, for ex- 
pense of printing 25 00 

Windsor, by Rev. P. W. Hullinger.. . 9 71 

MICHIGAN— $208.80. 

Received by Rev. L. Warren: 
Duncan City, Woman's Mies. 
Society, for Scandinavian 

Work $25 00 

Owosso, Cong. S. S., for North 

Star Mission 4 00 

29 00 



Received by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 
Treas. Woman's Home Miss. 
Union: 
Carson City, Y. P. S. C. E., 

proceeds of two concerts... $4 50 
Detroit, Thompson Avenue, 

Ladies' Miss. Soc 5 00 

Dorr. 6 00 

Eaton Rapids, Mite Boxes 7 00 

Greenville 11 35 

Hamburg 2 80 

Olivet. Ladies' Benev. Soc 15 00 

Standish, Miss Abbie Walker. 2 50 



54 15 



North Star Mission: 

Brainard, Dak., Amy L.North. 50 

Coloma, S. S ... 90 

Covert, Band or Hope Miss. 

Sor. concert 3 10 

Detroit, Ft. Wayne, S. S 1 30 

Eaton Rapids, S. S., add'l 4 50 

Farwell, s. s 2 00 

Fayette, S. S., add'l 50 

Flint, S. S., add'l 6 75 

Garden, S. S 180 

Greenville, S. S., add'l 10 

Hopkins, Bradley, S. S 3 20 

Jackson, S. S 21 32 

Kalamo, S. S 3 CO 

Kalamazoo, Miss Jessie B. 

Weed... 10 00 

Lansing, S. S., M. Soc 80 

Luther, Miss Mary Fletcher.. 35 

Michigan Center, S. S 3 00 

Nahma, S. S 30 

North Adams, S. S 5 00 

Olivet, A Friend. 1 50 

Ovid, "Helping Hand Soc.".. 3 66 

Pincknev 3 80 

St. Joseph, S. S 100 

Wacousta 1 50 

Watervliet, Stickney School- 
house, S. S. add'l 10 



80 58 134 

Banks, by Rev. P. F McClelland 9 

Bay Mills and Superior, by Rev. I. B. 

Lillie 2 

Brantlev, Hopkins, and Hopkins Sta- 
tion, by Rev. W. De Puy 5 

Charlevoix, by Rev. A. O. ^owns 8 

Cheboygan, by Rev. W. S. Bugbey.. 7 

Columbus, by Rev. \V. I. Hunt. 8 

Grand Haven, by Rev. R. Lewis .... 10 

Oxford, by Rev. J. K. Wells 8 

Port Sanilac and Carsonville, by Rev. 

M. H. Wright.... 14 

St. Louis, by Rev. W. Woodmansee.. 5 
Sand Lake and Cedar Springs, by Rev. 

E. C. HerringtoH 5 

Tyrone, by Rev. J. F. Kellogg 4 

Vernon, by Rev. F. W. Bush 10 



WISCONSIN— $30.80. 

Marinette, by Rev. A. II. Nelsen $5 00 

Wauwatosa, by Rev. M. E. Eversz 15 30 

West Superior, by Rev. F. T. Rouse.. 10 50 

IOWA— $13.00. 

Cherokee, C. E. Wellman, for Mo. Pelt 

Fund 5 00 

Goldlleld,C. Philbrook ._ 3 00 

Muscatine, A Friend, "Mo. Pelt Fund" 5 00 

MINNESOTA— $503. 85. 

Received by J. II. Morley, May and 
June: 

Brainerd, by F. M. Cable $20 00 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 89 50 

Lake City 12 00 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 05 00 

Rochester, Mrs. M. C. Sias.. 50 

Winona, Lake Side Mission 

ClassofBoys 100 

Zumbrota, Swedish Mission 

Ch.,by Rev. J. Rood 1 25 

189 25 
By Mrs. J. N. Cross, Treas. Wo- 
man's H. M. Soc: 
Duluth, Friends in Council, 

special 5 00 

Faribault, Mrs. T. C. Adams. 5 00 
Minneapolis, Second Ch., 
Mission S. S. Class, $17.70; 

Special by Ladies, $20 37 70 

Vine Ch.. W. M. S 10 00 

Plymouth 52 00 

Mrs. E. S. Jones, $25; 
Mrs. S. C. Gale, $25; 
Mrs. D. R. Barber, $10; 
Mis. J. E. Bell, $10.... 70 00 
Lady, 50 c; Mrs. O. J. Grif- 
fith, $4; Mrs. J. G. Smith, 
$5; Mrs. H. G. Lyman, $2; 
J. R. Buchanan, $2; R. E. 
Borbridge, $1; G. R. Ly- 
man, $5; Mrs. E. S. Wil- 
liams, $40 59 50 

Morris 2 00 

St. Paul, Park Ch 15 00 

Zumbrota.. 9 00 

265 20 454 45 

Ada, by Rev. S. Stone 14 25 

Cabel, and Sauk Rapids, by Rev. P. 

S. Smith 4 00 

Dassel, Lyle, and Preston Lake, by 

Rev. W. J. Parmelee... 90 

Minneapolis, by Rev. S V. S. Fisher. 20 00 

by Rev. K. F. Norris 5 00 

Villard, by Rev. E. N. Ruddock 5 00 

Worthington, Mrs. L. H. Clarke, for 

"Mo. Pelt Fund" 25 

KANSAS— $61.62. 

"Received by Rev. W. C. Veazie: 

Almena $5 50 

Gaylord. 2 50 

New Lebanon 3 96 

Oneida 5 21 

Wano 5 00 

22 17 

Bird City and Celia, by Rev. L. A. 

Smith.... 2 50 

Ford and Pleasant Vale, by Rev. J. E. 

Courter 1 00 

Greenleaf, A. Childs 15 00 

Kingman City, J. P. Ross 5 00 

Louisville and Mt. Union, by Rev. W. 

B. Fisher 2 00 

Mound City, by Rev. O. E. Lake 3 25 

Wabaunsee, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. J. 

F. Willard 2 20 

Wichita, by Rev. T. W. Minnis 8 50 



220 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



August, 



NEBRASKA— $160. 12. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile: 

Arborville, by F. N. Recknor $16 00 

Eagle, by Rev. W. S. Hills... 13 03 

Fairmont, by Amblers Bros. 

&Co 9 28 

Geneva, by S. W. Burton 5 00 

Hastings, Friends, by Rev. 

W. Walters.... 1 60 

Steele City, by Rev. H. J. Ma- 
comber 3 00 

Syracuse, by Rev. E. H. Ba- 3 00 

ker 3 00 

by J. A. Melville 3 60 

S. S. byF. Hull 2 04 

s 56 54 
By Mrs. D. B. Perry, Treas. 

Woman's H. M. Union: 

Blair 5 50 

Fremont 12 50 

King's Volunteers 10 00 

Irvington 15 00 

Sutton 3 00 

46 00 $102 54 
Doniphan, North Hastings and Trum- 
bull, by Rev. J. H. Embree 5 00 

Freewater and Moline, by Rev. J. W. 

Hadden 4 75 

Grand Island, by Rev. D.W. Comstock 1 40 

Greenwood, by D. M. Quackenbush.. 85 

Inland, by Rev. G. Grob 2 70 

by Rev. M. E. Eversz _ 100 

Lakeside, $4.10; Willow Valley, $4.08, 

by Rev. W. D. J. Stevenson 8 18 

Leigh and Howells, by Rev. G. R. Par- 
ish 6 70 

Mason and Alpine, by Rev. W. S. 

Houston 4 00 

Riverton, by Rev. W. S. Hampton 7 00 

Rushville, by Rev. P. St. Clair 7 00 

NORTH DAKOTA— $36.00. 

Armenia, by Rev. H. C. Simmons $10 00 

Carrington, by Rev. C. T. Whittlesey. 15 00 
Dawson and Tappan, by Rev. A. J. 

Pike 9 00 

Sanborn, by Rev. J. W. Donaldson... 2 00 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $75.17. 

Received by Rev. D. R. Tomlin : 

Canova._ $14 14 

Faulkton 1 30 

Howard City 8 00 

Lake Preston 10 00 

33 44 

Armour, by Rev. G. W. Rexford 10 00 

Canton, by Rev. J. L. Granger.. 5 27 

Custer City, by Rev. H. Bross 2 90 

Deadwood, Woman's Miss. Soc. of 

Cong. Ch., by Mrs. G. L. Mochel 10 00 

Powell, by Rev. J. F. Lewis 4 69 

Wakonda, by Rev. J. Lee 8 87 

COLORADO— $162.35. 

Received by Rev. C. M. Sanders: 

Arkansas Valley Assoc $6 05 

D. W. Bradley 2 00 

8 05 

Boulder, Ch.. 17 50 

Colorado Springs, First Ch., by J. B. 

Severy 76 80 

Denver, by Rev. E. H. Ashman 30 00 

Eaton, by Rev. J. W. King.. 30 00 

MONTANA— $12.00. 

Butte City, by Rev. J. B. Clark . ... 2 00 

Livingston, by Rev. W. C. Fowler 10 00 

UTAH— $2.50. 
Salt Lake City, Plymouth S. S., by Miss 
Anna Baker 2 50 



CALIFORNLV — $1,001.43; of which 
Legacy, $500.00. 

San Bernardino, Highland S. S., by G. 
E. Alpin 

San Francisco, A Friend 

Santa Barbara, Legacy of Salmon K. 
Wcldon, by Rev. C. T. Weitzel, to 
const. J. F. Metcalf, H. Beers, M. C. 
Kittridge, J. P. Beckstead, H. R. 
Hitchcock, E. E. Packard, J. T. 
Peed, Dora Jennings, Bertha Guild 
and Annie H. Hosmer L. Ms 

OREGON— $151.90. 

Arlington and Pasco, by Rev. D. Wirt 

Forest Grove, by Rev. C. F. Wood 

Grass Valley, by Rev. W. S. Runyan. 

Pendleton, by Rev. O. W. Lucas 

Seappoose, by Rev. I. G. Gordan 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $111.75. 

Half Moon and Spokane Falls, by Rev. 
J. Edwards 

Lake View, $9.50; Steilacoom, $17, by 

Rev. C. E. Newberry 

Pullman and Union Flat, by Rev. J. 

Da vies 

Seattle, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. H. L. 

Bates, add'l and in full, to const. J. 

H. Sanderson a L. M . . _ 

Ladies' Miss. Soc. of Plymouth Ch.,by 

Mrs. L. C. Reeves _ 

Semiahmoo and West Ferndale, by 

Rev. G. Baker... 

Walla Walla, First, by Anna Hill 

Home Missionary 



1 43 

500 00 



500 00 



32 10 

112 50 

3 00 

3 30 

1 00 



8 00 


26 50 


5 00 


25 00 


24 75 


2 50 

20 00 


23 52 



$29,205 42 



Donations of Clothing, etc. 

Canaan, N. H, Cong. Ch. by Mrs. J. N. 
Blodgett, Franklin, N. H., Commun- 
ion Service for Mrs. Pickett's Rocky 
Mountain Church 

Lincoln, Neb., Ladies' Soc. of First Ch., 
by Laura A. Boehmer, box and cash.. 

Rutland, Mass., Ladies' Benev. Assoc, 
by Mrs. D. C. Putnam, barrel and 
freight 

Waterbury, Ct., Woman's Benev. Soc. of 
Second Ch., by Mrs. G. C. Hill, box 
and freight — - - 



$107 13 



23 00 



35 90 



MAINE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Maine Missionary Society from 
May 5, to May 29, 1888, John L. Crosby, Treas. 

Auburn, High St. Ch., by G. R Page,Tr. $250 00 

Bangor, 1st Parish S. S-, by C. A. 
Bailey, Tr. 15 82 

Bath, Central Ch. and Soc, by F. S. Par- 
tridge, Tr 30 00 

Benton, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. T. P. 
Williams 7 13 

Bethel, "A Friend," by Rev. S. L. Bow- 
ler 5 00 

Boothbay, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. J. E. 
Adams - 10 15 

Brownfield, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. H. V. 
Emmons _ 6 26 

Brownville, Ch., by Rev. W. H. Mc- 
Bride 8 50 

East Baldwin, Ch., $5; A Friend, $1; by 
Mrs. Frank Brown _ 6 00 

Eliot, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. James 
Lade 25 00 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



221 



Ellsworth, Ch., by Erastus Redman, 

Esq., $20 of which to const. Rev, C. 

F. W. Hubbard, a L. M $40 BO 

Holdcn, Ch., by Rev. S. W. Chapin 6 00 

Island Falls, Ch., by Rev. Vincent 

Moses 10 00 

Jonesport, Ch., by Rev. E. L. Wal- 

bridge 26 50 

Kennebunk, Union Ch. and Soc, Jos. 

Titcomb,Esq 23 83 

Litchfield, Cor. Ch. and Soc, by D. T. 

Smith, Tr 11 00 

Machias, Center St. Cong. Ch., by A. L. 

Heaton, Tr., with other donations to 

const. Thomas Boynton a L. M 11 92 

Madison, Ch., by Rev. C. S. Wilder 50 00 

liilford, Ch., by E. P. Duren, Esq. 4 00 

Monson, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. W. G. 

Mann 15 00 

Patten, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. Vincent 

Moses 15 00 

Phippsburg, Ch., bv Rev. Chas. Dame .. 8 £0 

Portland, Fourth Ch., by Rev. J. (i. 

Wilson 15 00 

Richmond, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. Wm. 

Curtis 10 00 

Robbinston,Ch. and Soc, by Mrs. S.N. 

Allen, Tr 10 00 

Sebago, Soc, by Miss A. M. Lowell .. . 12 70 

Sherman Mills, Ch., by Rev. I. C. 

Bumpus 6 00 

Skowhegan, Island Avenue Ch., by Rev. 

A. Wiswell 13 00 

Standish, Ch. and Soc, by Miss A. M. 

Lowell _.. 2 30 

Stow and Chatham, Ch. and Soc, by 

Rev. II. Farrar 3 00 

Tremont, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. A. 

Redlon 16 00 

Union, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. P. V. Nor- 

cross 7 00 

West Auburn, Ch., by Rev. J. E. Adams 20 4"> 

Winslow, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. T. P. 

Williams 20 27 

Winthrop, Mrs. Stephen Sewall 10 00 

" Mrs. Lydia T. Fairbanks (in 

part for L.M.) 10 00 

Woolwich, Ch., by Rev. H. O. Thayer.. 14 50 
Yarmouth, 1st Ch., add'l, by C. L. Mars- 
ton, Tr. 15 00 

York, 2nd Ch. and Soc, by J. II. 

Moody 13 00 

Woman's Maine Missionary Auxiliary.. 3(51 75 

Dividends 51 50 

Rev. J. E. Adams, Sec, for preaching. 10 00 

SI, 204 58 
Previously acknowledged.. 12,582 00 

Total from June 13, 1887, to date $13,786 58 



Receipts from May 29, to June 12, 1888. 



Bangor, First Ch. and Soc, by W. P. Hub- 
bard, Tr 

Hammond St. Ch. and Soc, by Geo. 
Webster, Tr 

Central Ch. and Soc, W. S. Dennett, 

Tr 

Bath, Winter St. Ch. and Soc, by G. J. 

Mitchell, Tr 

Belfast, First Ch. and Soc, by B. P. 

Field, Tr 

Brewer, First Ch. and Soc, G. A. Snow, 

Tr 

Buxton, Ch., by Rev. G. W. Johnston.. 
Dexter, Ch., by Augustus dimming*, Tr. 
East Bangor, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. J. E. 

Adams, Sec. 

East Orrington, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. E. 

A. Harlow 

Foxcroft and Dover, Ch. and Soc, by C. 

H. B. Woodburv, Tr 

Garland, Ch. and Soc, bv Rev. P. B. 

Thayer 



$55 00 
88 25 



312 00 

80 00 

15 00 
6 67 
6 50 

3 00 



20 00 
10 00 



Hampden, Ch., by Dea. E. F. Duren $4 24 

Limerick, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. T. S. 
Perry 18 38 

Madison. Ch. andSoc.,add'l, by Rev. C. 
S. Wilder 1 00 

Norridgewock, Ch., by C. E. Warren, 
Tr 30 00 

Add'L "by lYev.'BVTappan,'b.D' "!"."." 2 00 

North Edgecomb, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. 
C. G. Holyoke, (rec'd May 19, 
omitted in previous acknowledg- 
ment) 36 12 

Portland, Win. W. Mitchell, Esq., to 
const. Mrs. Abbie'W. Mitchell iiL M. 20 00 

State St. Ch., by W. S. Corey, Tr 200 00 

Princeton, Ch. and Soc, by 8. G. 
Spoonen, Tr., to const. Rev. J. E. 
Aikins.a L. M 20 00 

South Bridgton.Ch. and Soc, by F. W. 
Sanborn, (rccM May 19, omitted in 
previous acknowledgment) 8 60 

Vassalboro, Adams Memorial Ch., by E. 

M. Dunham, Tr 5 00 

Waldoboro, First Ch., by Rev. R. P. 
Gardner 10 00 

Woolwich, Ch., add'l, by Rev. II. O. 
Thayer 1 00 

York, First Ch. and Soc, by Rev. Jos- 
eph Sewall, Tr 35 00 

Woman's Maine Missionary Auxiliary, 
byTr 648 62 

$1,718 69 
Previously acknowledged 13,786 58 

Total receipts from June 12, 1887, to 

date $15,505 27 

Erratum. — In the acknowledgment pnblished 
May 29, 1888, the credits to Sebago and Standish 
should read $4.70 and $10.30 respectively, instead 
of as then printed. 



WOMAN'S MAINE MISSIONARY AUX- 
ILIARY, MRS. R0SEM. CROSBY, TREAS. 

Receipts from May 29, to June 13, 1888. 

Auburn, Sixth St. Ch., Ladies' Aux., by 

Mrs. Wm. Maloon $10 00 

Bangor, First Ch., Ladies, by Mrs. 

Quiniby 13 00 

From Miss Mary G. Stackpole 5 00 

Hammond St., Ladies, by Mrs. Ger- 
trude A. Denio, $40 of which to 
const. Rev. Edwin A. Harlow and 
Mrs. Ellen E. Harlow L. Ms 56 65 

Central Ch., by W. S. Dennett, Tr.... 35 00 

Central Aid, by Miss Pearl 53 50 

Brewer Village, W. M. M. Aux., by Miss 

E. L. Long _ 13 35 

Calais, Ladies' Circle, by Mrs. F. P. 

McCully 25 00 

Caribou, Ladies' Five Cent Aid Soc, by 

Mrs. P. S. Goud 10 25 

Deer Isle, Ladies' Cent Soc, by Mrs. L. 

I. Spofford 8 00 

Dexter, Ladies of Cong. Ch. and Soc, 

by Mrs. J. W. Crosby (May, 1888).... 4 50 

East Orrington, Aux., by Miss Maria 

George _ 4 00 

Eastport, Auxiliary, by Miss M. Eva 

Tenney £ 40 

Fort Fairfield, W. M. M. Aux., by Mrs. 

H. O. Perry 9 '33 

Golden Ridge, Ladies, by Miss M. E. 

Hanson (May, 1888) 172 

Foxcroft and Dover, Ladies of Cong. 

Ch., by Mrs. D. A. Morehouse ■ 35 CO 

Garland, Ladies of Cong. Ch., add'l, by 

Miss Susan O. Curtis 10 00 



222 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



August, 



Hampden, Ladies' Aid, by Miss S. O. 

Curti b 

Joneeport, Woman's Miss'y Aux., . by 

Mrs. E. L. Walbridge 

North Bridgton, Ladies, by Mrs. C. C. 

Farnsworth _ 

Norway, Ladies of Cong. Ch.,by Mrs. 

Olive S. Hillyer 

Old town, Branch of W. M. M. Aux., by 

Mrs. A. M. Hilliard 

Orland, Friends. 

Orono, Ladies of Cong. Ch., by Mrs. M. 

L. Fernald _ 

Perry, Ladies of Cong. Ch., by Mrs. 

Chas. A. Leighton. 

Piscataquis Conference, by Mrs. D. A. 

Morehouse 

Portland, High St. Ch., by H. W. Shay- 

lor, Tr 

State St. Ch., by W. S. Corey, Tr 

Williston, Woman's Aux, by Mrs. M. 

E. Snell. 

Princeton, Ladies of Cong. Soc., by 

Mrs. John M. Curdy 

Sherman Mills, Ladies (May, 1888), by 

Miss M. E. Hanson _ _ 

Silver Ridge, Mrs. M. A. Spooner, by 

Miss M. E. Hanson 

South Berwick, Ladies of Cong. Ch., by 

Mrs. Kathevine B. Lewis 

South Freeport, Mrs. L. Stoddard, by 

Mrs. Eliza W. Soule 

Waldoboro, First Ch., W. M. M. Aux., 

by Mrs. Belle G. Gardner 

Woodfords, Maine Miss'y Aux., by Mrs. 

W. H. Scott 



Previously acknowledged 

Total receipts from June 11, 
date 



$8 50 


5 00 


5 00 


9 00 


500 
6 20 


5 00 


3 00 


2 50 


36 25 
75 00 


38 20 


16 00 


7 68 


1 00 


32 09 


1 04 


5 00 


11 55 


8561 41 
$1,078 96 



7, to 



$1,640 37 



NEW HAMPSHIRE HOME MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the New Hampshire Home Missionary 

Society, from April 1, 1888, to May 31, 1888, 
L. D. Stevens, Treas. 

Atkinson $6 08 

Amherst 29 48 

Bennington 12 09 

Center Harbor 10 00 

Chatham 2 00 

Concord, East, A Friend, for A. H. 

M. S 5 00 

Derry, East, Legacy of Elizabeth P. 

Taylor. 500 00 

Franklin 20 00 

Hill 11 00 

Hollis 16 53 

Keene 28 09 

Kingston ".VS.'S.'.V.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 10 22 

Marlboro * 8 23 

Mount Vernon," J, A " StoVveii," $5;" Ch. 

and Soc. $5, for A. H. M. S. 10 00 

Nashua, First 5J 00 

New Ipswich, $1.33 for A. H. M. S 2 43 

Peterborough 6 00 

Penacook, Mrs. A. W. Fisk, for A. H. 

M. S 5 00 

Rindge 9 00 

Sullivan .. 5 36 

Webster, Legacy of John Sanborn. 100 00 

Winchester, Ladies' Home Miss. Soc, to 

const. Mrs. Ellen M. Wardwell and 

Mrs. Helen Jewell L. Ms. of A. H. 

M. S. 

Windham, Legacy of Miss Achsah 

Hemphill .... 50 00 

New Hampshire Cent Society 12 60 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary 
Society, in June, Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treas. 

Auburn, by Rev. S. D. Hosmer, for A. 

H. M. S $54 00 

Beverly, Norwood, Mrs. Seth 1 00 

Boston, Adams, C. P., for Crete Acad- 
emy, Nebraska 100 00 

A Friend, X 15 00 

Boylston, by F. J. Leighton 13 72 

On account of special services en- 
joyed, by F. J. Leighton 183 37 

Denison, J. N., special 50 00 

Roxbury, Eliot, by Alpine McLean.. . 9 20 

Immanuel, by Francis J. Ward . 94 39 

West, South Evan., by J. H. Guild. 22 82 

"T." A Friend .. 7 50 

Boxboro, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. Geo. 

A. Perkins 8 00 

Cambridgeport, Pilgrim, by N. H. Hol- 

brook ._ 317 00 

Carter, Sabra, Fund, Income of 7 50 

Conway, Aldrich, Mrs. Harriet E 1 00 

Danvers Center, First, by George Tap- 
ley 68 19 

Drerfield, Orth., by Rev. A. A. Hazen, 

D.D.,add'l 10 00 

Douglas, A Friend, Thank-offering, by 

Rev. James Wells .. . 5 00 

First, by Rev. James Wells 18 40 

Dover, Second, by J. W. Higgins 14 25 

Enfield, by L. D. Potter 75 00 

Fairhaven, " M." 5 00 

Greenfield, Second, by Lucy A. Spar- 
hawk 41 18 

Hale, E. J. M., Fund, Income of 112 50 

Hampden Benev. Association, by Chas. 
Marsh, Treas.: 

Chicopee, Second $38 31 

Holyoke, First. 22 66 

Longmeadow, East 25 00 

Granville, West _ 10 00 

Palmer, Three Rivers, Union 

Evan 20 52 

South Hadley Falls 16 00 

Springfield, Indian Orchard 19 54 

Memorial 100 00 

Olivet 25 20 

277 23 

Harslwick, Calvinistic, by Rev. C. M. 

Peirce 8 00 

Holland, An invalid.. _ 5 00 

Hyde Park, First, S. S., by C. F. Holt.. 42 00 
Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. C. P. 
Vaughan, towards salary of a home 
missionary, and L. M'p. of Mrs. C. 

L. Green 40 00 

Lakeville, by Rev. S. B. Andrews 4 17 

" and Taunton Precinct, by C. F. 

Paull 11 08 

Lowell, High St., by Geo. W.Ely 198 86 

Pawtucket, by S. B. Simonds 31 50 

Massachusetts, " for Western work." .'. 10 00 

Medford, West, by E. C. Smith.. _. 13 37 

Special, for "Foreign Dep't Chi. 

Theo. Sem.,"by E. C. Smith 25 00 

Milton, First Evan., Two Friends 10 00 

New Bedford, Trin., by Robert G. To- 

bey .... 86 21 

Newburyport, Belleville, by Benj. Hale 247 00 

Newton, Auburndale, by C. C. Burr 48'3 33 

Northampton, First, by J. H. Searle... 259 37 

North Andover, Pratt, Miss H. J 1 00 

Rea, Letitia A, to const, self a L. M. 

of A. H. M. S 50 00 

Northfield, Trin., by Miss M. F. Dutton 71 80 
Norwood, Est. of Miss Cordelia Dupee, 
by Lemuel N. Fuller, Admin'r W. W. 

A 50 00 

Pittsfleld, First, by Frank W. Dutton... 90 00 

Reading, by S. G. B. Pearson 47 50 

Special 5 00 

Rochester, North, by Rev. S. B. An- 
drews 7 56 



isss. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



223 



Somerville, West, Dav St. Ladies' Miss. 

Society, by Mrs. Warren Upham, for 

A.II.M.S $5 00 

Southfield, Canneld.Mrs. E. S. .. 2 00 

Sotitliville, by Rev. T. A. Merrill 10 50 

Sudbury, Union, by Dexter Jones ... 90 00 

Taunton, East, by E. W. Cain 5 00 

Townsend.by J. M. Boutelle 28 25 

l'xl>ridge,Evan., by W. W.Tbayer 34 00 

Webster, First, by E. L. Spalding, for 

Fr. Prot. College 3 00 

Wellfieet, South, by Kev. Joshua S. Gay 10 00 

West Brookfield, by C. T. Huntington .. 47 55 
West port, Pacific Union S. S., by J. C. 

Macomber 7 47 

Weymouth, South, Second, by Kev. H. 

' C. Alvord 33 00 

Winchendon, North, by Kev. Davis 

Foster 12 00 

Winchester, First, by Eugene Tappan.. 32 IK 
" " Ladies, by Miss E. D. 

Chapin, special 18 50 

Worcester, Union, by 8. Newton 319 08 

Yarmouth, First, by Rev. John W. 

Dodge 60 00 

$4,031 03 

Home Missionary 2 20 



$4,033 23 



Donations of Clothing, etc., received and reported 
at the rooms of the Mass. Home Miss. Soc, in 
June. > 

Newton, Eliot, Ladies, bv Mrs. E. J. 
Locke, two barrels and freight $308 02 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECT! 
CUT. 

Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut, 
in June, Ward W. Jacobs, Tiki*. 

Coventry, Second, by E. C. Chapman, to 
const. Henry R. Hoisington, Jr., of 
Coventry, a L. M 

Darien, by M. S. Mather, ann'l 

Derby, Birmingham, by James Ewen 

Fairfield, First, by O. B. Jennings, ann'l 
for A. H. M. S., $50 of which is from 
Oliver B. Jennings, to const. Edwin S. 
Randolph, of Fairfield, a L. M 



$59 00 
40 00 
20 68 



100 73 



Franklin, by Rev. H. E. Hart $8 00 

Glastonbury, Buckingham, by Rev. A. 

Gardner. 3 50 

Hartford, Pearl Street, by Dea. George 

M. Welch, $32; W. W. Jacobs, $5 37 00 

Hebron, Gilead, by Josiah C. Gilbert... 42 00 

Killingworth, by N. II. Evarts 15 47 

Lisbon, by Rev. Q. M. Boswurth 15 00 

Mansfield, Second, Mrs. George F. King 1 00 

Meriden, First, by William H. Catlin... 100 00 
New Haven, First, by F. S. Bradley, 

$147.95; Supplementary, $4.50. 152 45 

Taylor, by John Adams 8 00 

United, by F. T. Jarwan 101 70 

Newington, by II. M. Robbins, $19.44; 

add'l, $13.21 32 65 

New Milford, by C. H. Noble 8S 57 

Norwich, Broadway, by S. B. Bishop... 200 00 

Greenville, by F. W. Carey 13 ss 

Orange, by S. D. Woodruff, special 12 00 

Kidgefleld, by A. Y. Paddock, for A. H. 
M. S.,to const. Rev. William W. Leete 

of Ridgelield, a L. M 57 71 

Salem, by Rev. Jairus Ordway, $24; 

add'l, $10.25 31 25 

Southington, Plantsville, by E. P. Hotch- 

kiss.. 121 48 

Thomaston, by P. Harrow, §17.23; $44.30 61 53 
Vernon, Rockville, Second, Sunday- 
school, by S. T. Noble 15 00 



$1,335 60 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY 
SALARIES. 

Previously acknowledged $5,552 93 

Connecticut, Middletbwn, $65; New 
Haven, $114 179 00 

District of Columbia, Washington 70 00 

$5,801 93 



CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledged $2,596 82 

Connecticut, Bethlehem, $1; Newington, 

$15 16 00 

Massachusetts, Pittsfield ^ 00 



2,614 82 



224 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



August, 1888. 



WLottmu's Mate g. pt. ©rganizatiutxs. 



New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org. 

1805, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Concord, Sec. 
Minnesota Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. 1872, Mrs. II. L. Chase, Minneapolis, Sec. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1880, Mrs. Gertrude H. Demo, Bangor, Sec. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1881, Mrs. Leroy Warren, Lansing, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 1881, Mrs. Geo. L. Epp*, Topeka, Sec. 
Ohio, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1882. Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Oberlin, Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 18*1, Mrs. William Spalding, 6 

Salmon Block, Syracuse, Sec. 
Wisconsin, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

or^Oct., 1883, Mrs. C. Matter, Brodhead, Sec. 
North Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1883, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Ilar- 

wood, Sec. 

Washington, \ Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
' ety, org; Julv, 1884, Mrs. N. F. Cobleigh, 

Walla Walla, Sec. 
South Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary 

Union, org. Sept., 1884, Mrs. S. E. Young 

Sioux Falls, Sec. 



Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Jan., 1885, Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, Hart- 
ford, Sec. 
Missouri, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1885, Mrs. E. P. Bronson, 3100 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1885, Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Iowa, Woman's Home Missionary Unien, org. 

June, 188(5, Miss Ella E. Marsh, Grinnell, Sec. 
California, Woman's Home Missionary Society 

org. Oct., 1887, Mrs. M. L. F. Eastman, San 

Francisco, Sec. 
Nebraska, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

Nov., 1887, Mrs. L. F. Berry, Fremont, Sec. 
Florida, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Feb. 1888, Mrs. N. Barrows, Winter 

Park, Sec. 
Indiana, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1888, Mrs. W. E. Mossman, Fort Wayne, 

Sec. 
Southern California, Woman's Home Missionary 

Union, org. May, 1888, Mrs. H. K. W. Bent, 

Pasadena, Sec. 
Vermont, Woman's Home Missionary Union' 

org. June, 1888, Mrs. E. C. Osgood, 14 Firs 4 

Avenue, Montpelier, Sec. 



^Mittoxit a Roman's M^tt 3J. pt. ©rjatxteaticm. 



Alabama. 

Arizona. 

Arkansas. 

Carolinas. 

Colorado. 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Georgia. 

Idaho. 



Indian Territory. 

Kentucky. 

Louisana. 

Maryland. 

Massachusetts. 

Mississippi. 

Montana. 

Nevada. 

New Jersey. 



New Mexico. 

Pennsylvania. 

Rhode Island. 

Tennessee. 

Texas. 

Utah. 

Virginia. 

Wyoming. 



Fo« many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the homes of 
its missionaries, with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance of these favors 
is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribution, attention is invited 
to the following suggestions. 

1! Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, if practi- 
cable, how soon a box will probably be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applying to the Secretaries, notify them without delay so as to 
guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. If several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the Secre- 
taries, whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, not 
by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise as " fast freight," by railroad, 
taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in the box. 
and the money, $2, $3, or $4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of freight (if it 
cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter of acknowledgment 
should be addressed. 

6. Report to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the amount sent 
for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the Secretaries, 
put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from whom it comes, and 
the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of acknowledgment- 

8. Mark the box, "American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New York,'' 
adding I 'he name of 'the place from which it comes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing money for freight, and stating the time when and the line by 
which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide in the assignment 
of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and sex of each child for whom 
the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants of the Society. It needs the same amount of 
money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no such gifts were 
provided; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or dimkiish their contribu- 
tions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are needful. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

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Office and Parlors: 157 W. 23rd St. New YORK. 

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purifier, which restores tone to the nerves and presides over all vital changes towards the health 
standard. 

It is used in both office and HOMK TBKATMENT ; is adapted to all phases of chronic 
disease, especially of the Stomach, l^iver, Bowels, Skin and Air Passages, and it stands 
alone as the remedy for Asthma, Catarrh, Consumption and I>ehility. 

Send for our Treatise on "K" OXYGEN TREATMENT, which will be mailed free to 
those who give us their full name and address. 

KNICKERBOCKER OXYGEN SUPPLY CO., 

157 West Twenty-third Street, New York City. 

N. B.-We manufacture all kinds of Oxygen Apparatus for Physicians, Schools, Hospitals, 
&c. Send for our Descriptive Price List. 



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everywhere- Send for Circular. 
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^ — 34 1 Broadway, NEW YORK. 
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Wholesale Western Agents. 





DEATH TO BLOOD POISON. 

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of the Brooklyn Elevated Railroad, writes: "Inflamma- 
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their natural size. 1 suffered excruciating pain. Your 
wonderful S. S. S. made a complete cure." 



sss 



FOR THE BLOOD, 

CATARRH AND SCROFULA 



Water Valley, Miss.: Our little girl, Jessie, had 
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New York and Philadelphia; also, Hot Springs, Ark., 
without avail. Swift's Specific cured her. 

D. R. Wagner. 

Treatise on Blood and Skin Diseases mailed 
Free! 

THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., 

756 Broadway, New York. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



China Mattings are being more extensively used every year. The colorings and designs being 
artistic and goods inexpensive and durable. From the low price in white of $8.75 per roll 40 yards. 
£S?£ y j 1 ?. * 400 ,- J a P anes *e seamless, from $5.00 roll. Extensive assortment in fine Fancy, 
white and Damask Patterns at low prices. 

CARPETINCS. 

"We are displaying a large line in Ingrains, Brussels, Velvet, Moquettes, Axminsters, and they 
should be seen to be appreciated. Our line of Mats and Rugs should not be overlooked. Sizes 
from 18x36 inches to 12x15 feet. Chairs and Rockers have recently been added to stock. Ladies' 
SewiEg Rockers, at 75c. Children's Chairs, 25c. A full line of Hotel, Balcony and Porch Chairs. 
Also Upholstered Chairs and Rockers at very close prices. Inspection invited. 

ANDREW 

Near Eighth Street, 



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Advertising Department. 

rpHE attention of the readers of THE HOME MIS- 
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to its advantages as an advertising medium. It has a 
large circulation, covering the whole country, and the use 
of its pages cannot fail to secure the most satisfactory 
returns. Address, 

The Argus Printing Co. 

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THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price could not 
well be less. Us whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they prefer to pay, 
it will be sent without further charge, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members; Missionaries 
of the Society and its Auxiliaries; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their Congregations; 
also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy for every ten dollars collected and 
paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. Pas- 
tors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this Journal at the 
Monthly Conceit and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 



APPLICATIONS FOR AID. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should make 
a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an application. They 
should also give these particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations. 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office address : Town, County, State. 

Does he reside on his field of labor ? Is he installed pastor ? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry ? 

Of what local church is he a member? 

Of what Ministerial Association ? 

The number of persons composing hisfamily. 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people, and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage? 

Is aid expected from any other source? 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. S. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to the Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the conditions, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by the 
trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose limits the congregation is found, has a " Committee 
of Missions, " the members of that Committee should certify these statements, the standing of the 
minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no such " Committee 
of Missions 1 ' exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more neighboring clergymen 
acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet gathered, applicants will follow 
the same course as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary of the 
Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application ; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing all the 
particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To this the certificate of the missionary that the 
congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 



FORM OF A BEQUEST. 
I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall 

act as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the 
year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said 
Society, and under its direction. 



AUGUST, 1§S§. 

AMEMCATEfflWsrONmslGIETY, 

Bible House, *lstor Place, JYetv York. 



Rev. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 
Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D., i . ^ n 

Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D.D., \ Secretaries f or Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. CLAPP, D.D., Treasurer. 

Executive Committee:— Mb. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; Mr. WM. HENRY SMITH; Rev.^WM. M. 
TAYLOR, D. D.; Mr. CHARLES H. PARSONS; Mr. ALBERT WOODRUFF; GEO. P. SHELDON, 
Esq.; Rev. JAMES G. ROBERTS, D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; Mr. JOSEPH WM. 
RICE; Mr. HERBERT M. DIXON; Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D.; Rev. ROBERT R. MERE- 
DITH, D. D.; Mr. FRANCIS FLINT; Mr. JAMES MITCHELL ; Mr. ASA A. SPEAR; WM. IVES 
WASHBURN, Esq., Recording Secretary. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for 

Correspondence. 

Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, and to the Woman's 

Department, may be addressed to Mrs. II. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y, 



DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS, 

In Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders; also Communications relating to the 
business matters of The Home Missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be addressed 
to Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Post-Office Orders should be drawn on STATION D, New York City. 
A Payment of $50 constitutes a Life Member,, 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Clark C. Otis, Financial Superintendent, Lible House, New York. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, Work among Bohemians, Poles, etc., Cleveland, 0. 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, Work among Germans, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandinavians, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Rev. Leroy Warren Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. Edw. D. Curtis Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rev. J. fl. Morley Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Franklin B. Doe St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. L. P. Broad ...Topeka, Kan. 

Rev. E. L. Hood Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

Rev. R. A. Beard ..Wash. Ter. 

Rev. Geo. A. Hood, Ashland, Wis. 



Rev. John L. Maile Omaha, Neb. 

Rev. Hiram D. Wiard Mitchell, Dak. 

Rev. II. C Simmons Fargo, No. Dak. 

Rev. C. M. Sanders Denver, Col. 

Rev. W. S. Hawkes Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. J. H. Warren, D.D.._San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. G. II. Atkinson, D.D Portland, Or. 

Eev.T. W. Jones, 31 Bible House,Nevv York City. 



SECRETARIES AND TREASURERS 

OF THE AUXILIARIES. 

Rev. JONATHAN E. ADAMS, D. D., Secretary, Maine Missionary Society Bangor, Me. 

JOHN L. CROSBY, Esq., Treasurer " Bangor, Me. 

Rev. EDWARD H. GREELEY, D.D., Secretary, New Hampshire Home Miss. Soc. Concord, N. H. 

Hon. LYMAN D. STEVENS, Treasurer •' " Concord, N. H. 

Rev. CHARLES H. MERRILL Secretary. Vermont Domestic " St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

J. C. EMERY, Esq., Treasurer " " Montpeliar,Vt. 

Rev. JOSHUA CO IT, Secretary Massachusetts Home '• ) 22 Congr. House. 

Rev. EDWIN B. PALMER, Treasurer " " f Boston, Mass. 

Rev. ALEXANDER McGREGOR, Secretary.. Rhode Island " " Pawtucket, R. I.I. 

EDWIN BARROWS, Esq., Treasurer " " " Providence, R. 

Rev. WILLIAM H. MOORE, Secretary Missionary Soc. of Connecticut. Hartford, Conn. 

WARD W. JACOBS, Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. AUGUSTUS G. UPTON, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society... Syracuse, N. Y. ■ 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " ■' New York City. 

Rev. J. G. FRASER, Secretary _ Ohio " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " " New York City. 

Rev. JAMES TOMPKINS, D. D., Secretary... Illinois " " | lolWashingtonSt, 

AARON B. MEAD, Esq., Treasurer " " " J Chicago, Illinois. 

Rev. T. G. GRASSIE, Secretary Wisconsin " •« Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. A. McCOLLOUGH, Esq., Treasurer " " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. DOUGLASS, Secretary Iowa " " Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. MERRILL, Esq., Treasurer " " " Des Moines, Iowa 



The arqus Printing Company, New York and Jeksey City. 



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THU / 




Home Missionary. 



SEPTEMBER, 1888, 



CONTENTS 

THAT $100,000 ADVANCE 325 

RESIGNATION OF SECRETARY 

BARROWS 226 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 
ON SECRETARY BARROWS' 

PAPER 229 

LAYMEN TO THE FRONT 229 

A STRAW 234 

MISSOURI 235 

HOW A REVIVAL BEGAN 238 

NEW LEAFLETS 240 

THE GROUND-HOG SKIN 242 

FROM A SWEDISH STUDENT. . . .244 

WITHIN REACH 244 

FROM AN OUTSIDER 245 

THE PAPER MISSION 245 

A DAKOTA INVITATION 250 

BAD PRAYERS 250 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 251 

Illustrations: Rocky Mountains ; 
A few op Mrs. Pickett's Cow- 

Boys 251 

Oregon and Washington 252 

New York 253 

Michigan 253 

Story op a Mission Band 254 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 256 

Do Good 256 

Apple Blossoms 256 

Questions and Answers 256 

Banner State this Month 257 

A Good Answer 258 

Dollars for Self and Cents for 

Christ 258 

APPOINTMENTS 260 

RECEIPTS 260 

MISSIONARY BOXES 268 

WOMAN'S STATE HOME MIS- 
SIONARY ORGANIZATIONS. . . 268 



Vol. LXI. No. 5. 



NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Bible House, Astor Place. 



SIXTY CINTS A TEAS, \\\ ADVANCE, POSTAGE PAID. 



ENTERED AT THK POST OFFICE AT NEW YORK, N. T., AS SECOND CLASS [XAH.] MATTES. 



THE 

HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Preacii the GosrEL Mark xvi. 15. 

IIow Bhall they preach except they be sent? Rom. x. 15. 

VOL. LXL SEPTEMBER, 1888. No. 5. 

THAT $100,000 ADVANCE! 

Those of our readers who, at Saratoga last June, took a hand in that 
enthusiastic vote for one hundred thousand dollars advance will of 
course be glad to look their resolution in the face again. And it is full 
time that the rest of our readers — since they are all to take part in carry- 
ing that vote into effect — should be making themselves familiar with its 
cheering aspect. For the sake of both parties, therefore, we here repro- 
duce the vote from The Home Missionary for July. 

Resolved, That we have listened with profound interest to the paper of Secretary 
Clark, entitled " A Crisis in Home Missions;" that we appreciate the seriousness of the 
crisis he describes; that we indorse the appeal he makes for an advance of $100,000 as 
the least that will be at all adequate to the emergency; and we pledge ourselves, as 
much as in us lies, to co-operate with the management of the American Home Mis- 
sionary Society in securing the money needed. 

The receipts during the dry summer months are no fair criterion of the 
churches' attitude towards the Society and its work. Yet it is a pleasure 
to say that those receipts in the four months of the new fiscal year, end- 
ing July 31st, exceed those of the same months in the previous year by 
$8,575.68 — the gain from legacies being $3,603.08, and that from contri- 
butions, $4,972.60. From this we feel warranted in believing that the 
friends of Home Missions mean to keep, month by month, in advance of 
all previous giving. The chief object of this note is to remind them that 
the carrying out of the Saratoga resolution will call for an early, simul- 
taneous start in the autumn, on such plans as shall seem in each case 
the wisest, and a continuance of the effort until the end is attained— not 

LESS THAN $650,000 BEFORE THE END OF MARCH, 1889 ! 



Is it too much, therefore, to hope that with a united effort of all— 
an effort inspired by the cries of these watchmen whom we have set 
on the wall to tell us of the night, an effort enforce 1 by the astounding 
growth and needs of the great West and consecrated by a passion for 
country, for souls and for God,— we shall succeed? 



22G THE HOME MISSIONARY. September. 



RESIGNATION OF SECRETARY BARROWS. 

With unfeigned sorrow we have to announce that Rev. Walter M. 
Barrows, D.D., for seven years a Corresponding Secretary of the Society, 
has felt compelled by reasons of health, his own and that of his family, 
to retire from office and to seek a more inland climate for his future 
home. 

The Executive Committee have most reluctantly accepted his resigna- 
tion. Their estimate of his services is expressed in the following Minute, 
passed Aug. 1 : 

Rev. Walter M. Barrows, D.D., having at the last meeting of this 
Committee resigned his secretaryship, to take effect on the 30th of Septem- 
ber next, and the Committee having felt compelled by its sense of duty 
to Dr. Barrows very reluctantly to accept the resignation, 

This Committee desires to place on record its sense of the serious loss 
that Dr. Barrows' laying down of the office he has filled so acceptably for 
nearly seven years, brings upon the Society — a loss that should not be 
incurred save for the most imperative reasons. Such reasons the Com- 
mittee sorrowfully recognize in the present and prospective condition of 
the Secretary's health and that of his family, calling for their residence 
in a less rigorous and more equable climate. 

The fact that the providence of God has opened, unsought, the way 
to such a change of climate where Dr. Barrows may still most usefully, 
and in the way of his choice, serve the Master in the pastoral office, 
where he may also render most efficient and acceptable aid to the cause 
with which he has here been so intimately connected, the Committee look 
upon as a clear indication of the Master's will and of their own duty. 

While thus consenting to the severing of this relation, the Executive 
Committee take pleasure in expressing their high appreciation of the 
sterling qualities Dr. Barrows brought to the office and the eminent ser- 
vices he has rendered the Society: his eloquent advocacy of its claims, by 
voice and pen; his fertility in resources: his comprehensive views of the 
work to be done and the methods of accomplishing it; his strong grasp of 
the country's present need, and keen foresight of its far greater needs in 
coming years ; his steady devotion to the multiform duties of the sec- 
retaryship, combined with his gift for inspiring the laborers in the 
broad field with much of his own consecrated enthusiasm; his firm faith in 
the Gospel as the power that is to save our land and the world — these are 
among the qualities and the services for which he will be remembered by 
this Committee, and whose effects will be felt in the prosecution of the 
work in years to come. 



L888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 227 

And so, reciprocating all that our friend has said of the pleasant at d 
Cordial relations we have mutually sustained; heartily commending him 
to the confidence and co-operation of the church to whose leadership he 
goes, and to the loving kindness of our covenant-keeping Savior, we bid 
him Godspeed and Farewell. 

An attractive cover will insure a glance into even a Missionary 
pamphlet, — but he who is thus beguiled to turn the leaves of the Eighty- 
ninth Annual Report of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, will 
be sure to read on with unabated interest, even into the figurative lan- 
guage of the treasurer. This venerable society, twenty-seven years older 
than its mother, has received this year $127,222.52 for Home Missions, 
which is $6,510. G6 more than last year; and has enriched the treasury of the 
American Home Missionary Society to the amount of $165,547.88 for 
work in the West. Grants have been made to 102 churches and mis- 
sions, 15 of which have been made for work among the Massachusetts 
foreign population, including Swedes, French, and Germans. 



We stand where two ways meet. "We shall take care of the people 
or the people will take care of us. The people are the rulers ; the power 
of the future is in their hands. Limit the horizon to this lii:; let penury, 
sickness, and sorrow change the man to a wolf; let him know no God and 
Father who hears his cry, no Savior to help, no brother to bind up his 
wounds; let there be on the one side health and luxury and wanton 
waste, and on the other side, 'poverty, misery, and despair, there will be as 
there has been, a cry for blood." — Bishop of Minnesota at Lambeth Con- 
ference. 

A nation is a Christian nation just so far as the people are Chris- 
tians. . . . But it must be insisted more and more strenuously that 
it is not so much immigration that constitutes our peril, as the way in 
which we handle our immigrants. If we would inform them frankly 
that the civilization into which we receive them is a Christian civilization, 
maintain over them kindly but firmly the restraints of righteous law, 
abolish the saloon, forbid the desecration of the Sabbath, welcome their 
children to a school with the Bible in it, and thus quicken and intensify 
the assimilating forces of our national life, we should greatly reduce the 
danger from this source. Mere restrictions on the volume of immigra- 
tion are not the safeguard against the peril it involves, but a healthier 
and more robust national Christianity. The evil is a moral and spiritual 
one and it demands a moral and spiritual cure. — Geo. Wm. Curtis at 
Gettysburg. 

Send to us for '"'Fresh Facts and Figures" revised to 1888. 



228 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September. 

There is neither soul, square mile, nor hamlet, nor tongue of man, 
with whose enlightenment in Christ I have not a personal responsibility. 
No man is acting in the spirit of Christ save as his hands are full of work, 
his heart full of prayer, his soul full of enthusiasm, and the treasuries of 
his church full of his gifts for evangelization at home, for evangelization 
abroad, for evangelization of the whole world in the blessed Christ's dear 
name. — Rev. A. S. FisJce. 



The Woman's State Home Missionary Society of Northern California 
have already added to the Home Missionary Treasury, $2,082.95. An 
exceptional record for a new society. And now, Nevada, Idaho, and 
Arkansas women ask to come into the line of organized work for the 
home-land. The churches of the East have planted good seed at the 
West, which is springing up into vigorous growth. Eecent developments 
indicate that the women of the West are likely to out-vie their sisters of 
East in this matter of united, organized effort for Home Missions. 



A Question. — How can we get hold of the Young Ladies' Societies 
which do not become auxiliary to us? They work well, and give well. 
We covet them. — Secretary of tl>e Iowa W. H M. U. 

Answers to this question are earnestly solicited. Our own thought is 
this: Let each Woman's State Union appoint a special State secretary to 
look after the home missionary work among the young people. Give 
each organization the largest liberty to carry out its own methods of Avork. 
Let one general name designate all societies of young ladies, such as 
"Daughters of the Union," or "Daughters of the King," or "Young 
Ladies' Christian League," etc., while the State Societies are known as 
"Iowa Daughters," "Connecticut Daughters," or "League," etc. 

To gather in the children, and all who are not already organized for 
home missionary work, let every Congregational Sunday-school become 
a " Home-Land Circle," and give, at least, fifteen or twenty minutes, 
once a month, to a short, spicy, home missionary programme, one exer- 
cise of which to include a collection taken by a committee of boys and 
girls. These suggestions are offered in the hope that they will provoke 
discussion of an important subject. Could some such plan be carried out, 
then, indeed, would the whole army be Avell equipped for an earnest, 
determined, united effort to win this land for Christ. 



We have several calls from Home Missionaries for church hymn-books, 
particularly for " Songs of the Sanctuary." We will gladly supply 
names to those who can meet this demand. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 229 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SECRETARY BARROWS' PAPER. 

PRESENTED BY ITS CHAIRMAN, MR. HAMILTON W. MABIE, OP NEW YORK. 

Dr. Barrows' forcible statement of the lack and the need of lay 
activity in missionary work commands the hearty assent of the friends of 
Home Missions assembled here, and ought to have the universal attention 
of the churches. It touches the heart of the greatest difficulty in church 
work and growth, — the absence of a sense of personal resj)onsibility and of 
the necessity and duty of personal effort; and it indicates the one direc- 
tion along which the greatest development is possible. The church has 
done much, but it has still greater things to do in the crisis of modern 
society, and its inexhaustible powers are still largely unused. They 
reside in personal faith and righteousness and in the individual activity 
which is the fruit of this seed. No class of men however gifted and con- 
secrated are sufficient for the work laid upon the churches; no organized 
force is adequate to it; the salvation of society depends upon the common 
enthusiasm and activity of the whole body of Christians, inspired by a 
common purpose and directed to a common end. The ministry cannot 
accomplish unaided the mighty task which demands the work of the 
heart and hand of every Christian. Lay activity is the supreme need and 
duty of the hour, and Dr. Barrows' paper has the unqualified indorse- 
ment of this committee in all its positions and in its appeal; our only 
anxiety is to devise methods of carrying it home to the conscience of the 
churches. 

Hamilton W. Mabie. 

James L. Hill. 

Nehemiah Boynton. 

James White. 

A. Lines Van Blatcom. 



LAYMEN TO THE FRONT. 

BY REV. JAMES L. HILL, MEDFORD, MASS. 

From an Address delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Home Missionary 
Society, at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., June 7, 1888, upon Secretary Barrows' 
Paper on " Lay Activity in Missionary Work," etc. 

Last Sunday was the twenty-fifth anniversary of the beginnings of a 
movement which sets forth in vivid and picturesque form the responsi- 
bilities and opportunities and achievements of stalwartism often found 
in the rank and file of men. General Lee had determined upon his 
second invasion of the North. The lamentable disasters at Fredericks- 
burg and Ghancellorsville had produced a depressing effect upon the 
country at large. Our national currency, which is so quick to detect the 
feelings or the popular heart, ran right down to its minimum in value. 



230 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

Volunteering began to flag. Desertions were frequent. The rebels, hav- 
ing been so successful, were enthusiastic and presuming. It was the 
darkest hour in the history of the Rebellion. Loyal hearts everywhere 
were depressed. General Lee, having been reinforced by General Long- 
street, was promising his followers as a reward, for booty, the capture of 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, or Washington. 

The condition of things was desperate. Our national leaders were 
thoroughly alarmed. No one, however, better than the common soldier 
in the ranks apprehended the imminent peril. Determination was rising 
high. Patriotism became a passion. One lofty purpose possessed the 
soul. Such resolve had come to actuate the rank and file of the men, and 
to such a degree were all their loyal hearts rallied and centered, that when 
the first army corps, which had been wearily plodding its way toward 
Gettysburg, came into proximity to the engagement, enthusiasm spread 
like an infection, and the men with a cheer went up into the line of 
battle on a run. More men were left dead upon the field than the Ger- 
mans lost in the long Franco- Prussian War. As General Lee began his 
retreat he exclaimed, "This is the beginning of the end." Gettysburg, 
the pivot on which our national destinies turned, was a soldiers' battle. 
The men in the rank and file did not even know who was in command. 
This greatest struggle was fought and won by our troops in an over- 
whelming consciousness of personal responsibility. The crisis was 
believed by each man to rest upon the masses in the field. It stands out 
upon the page of living history as the symbol of the issues of life in our 
land. In political, in theological, in missionary, and in aggressive spheres 
of thought and action, final decision must rest upon the intelligence, the 
devotion, and the patriotism of our men. In the Art Building, in the 
Exposition at Philadelphia, among the paintings before which knots of 
people were constantly hanging, there was represented a central figure 
repulsing the wild charge of Pickett's division. It was a common soldier 
surrounded by his associates. As a mark of the signs of the times, make 
a study of the memorials of valor as they stand to-day in monumental 
stone and bronze, and you will find that the figure which stands forth to 
exemplify modern heroism and achievement is not an officer of the staff 
but a common soldier from the ranks. When General Stonewall Jackson 
was dying, on Sunday afternoon, in his delirium he imagined that he was 
commanding a bloody fight, and this command rang out upon the startled 
air : "Order A. P. Hill to prepare for action. Advance the infantry to 
the front rapidly." 

Friends, this is the marching order for the church militant in this 
later day in which we live. The infantry is to be advanced to the front 
all along the line. We who are set to be leaders are to reach out our 
hands sympathetically on right and left to those who. in the providence 
of God, unknown to many of us, are springing up as an element of 



isss. 77/ A' HOME MISSIONARY.. 23] 

strength and of help to aid us in the now crisis in our country's history. 
Once we engaged in what we will call Homeric warfare, when success 
wus determined by an engagement of chieftains or leaders. That sort of 
conflict is now gone forever, and I venture to assert that the present 
spiritual exigency which is upon its in this country will he determined by 
one thing, and it is this: The Capacity <>f the best Men in our 
Churches to be aroused by Great Motives to Work j.\ a Great 
Cause. If this is true, great is the responsibility of ministers in discover- 
ing the motives and in stating the cause. Our laymen must catch the 
spirit of the life of this new nation as it has now become. There are 
larger, nobler lives than many of us suspect, now awaiting the earnest 
call of the present necessities of our land in its new emergency to reveal 
their devotion to Christ and to country, and to make unusual sacrifice, 
and to display their power. Such men are being developed by their 
reading, by our free institutions, and by our sympathetic national life. 

Mr. Moderator : Our honored secretary has here come into touch 
with the vast popular movement. He detects a providential trend. 
He discovers an age-thought. The committee reporting upon this 
paper cannot conceal that mood of congratulation which they feel, that 
we have men arranging these anniversaries who sound a high key-note 
on living issues. It has now come to pass that this Home Missionary 
meeting crystallizes thought for churches in the East as well as in the 
West. These two young men, our efficient and forth-putting secretaries, 
are now developing such lines of practical thought and of heroic and 
patriotic endeavor that those of us who want to keep our churches 
abreast of the times do not dare to absent ourselves from these meetings, 
nor ignore their lines of thought, for fear of being left behind in the 
movements of our day. 

Much amusement has been indulged in respecting the confusion of 
names among our benevolent societies. In the case of this organization, 
whose anniversary we celebrate, I catch at three words, and let go their 
order. They are "Society," "Missionary," and "Home." When what 
is called our Lord's last command is quoted, great emphasis is laid upon 
the first monosyllable "Go," as if that were the commission, and people 
become restless and migratory. Pray let the command ring out as the 
Savior uttered it: "Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to 
every creature." That creature may be here as well as there. We, by 
the title of the Society, are to be missionaries and evangels in our home. 
that is, in our country, and in our land. In speaking of the kingdom of 
God men say that it is "like leaven." But our Savior said: ''It is like 
leaven which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal until the 
whole was leavened." Like this let the kingdom of God be, as it is 
advanced by this Society in our home-land from sea to sea and from the 
river to the ends of the earth. 



232 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

To this end let there be, I., as Secretary Barrows so well suggests, a 
sympathetic intelligence on the part of our broad and benevolent and 
wealthy lay members. The day is gone for what I will call the monkish style 
of soliciting alms. Once the holy father, in cowl and somber vestments, 
asked an alms upon the highway with no explanation as to what use was 
to be made of it. In a sort of pity, and with a sense of self-satisfaction, 
and with the old-time understanding that the church was to be somehow 
kept along, wealthy patrons would fling out a nimble coin; to-day our first 
duty is to interest and then raise money. The greatest preacher in our 
generation was signally successful because he did not, as the primary 
thing, ap])eal for money. He sought first to inspire an interest in the 
object and then he received the gifts. 

II. As our great want is laymen who will stand squarely with us, 
and who will take up our purposes and strive to help us work them out in 
aggressive religious endeavor, let us patiently and persistently discover to 
the laity in our churches that a man's life and power and success depend 
upon what he identifies himself with. No man is great enough to stand 
alone. Grant was not. Lincoln was not. Gladstone is not. Dr. 
Good ell, of St. Louis, merged himself in his church, and when that was 
conspicuous he was distinguished. Some men allied themselves to the 
cause of emancipation and became useful and really eminent, and, eman- 
cipation being accomplished, they attached themselves to causes less 
worthy, and proportionately lost their influence and power. Now, if 
laymen are to have success and influence and power by means alone of 
that with which they identify themselves, what other cause sb invites 
them as that which is permanent like the church, and patriotic like the 
work of this Society? 

III. Let us inspire the laymen in our congregations with a personal 
interest in studying the movements of the pillar and the cloud. There is 
evidently a providential design just now culminating in our land. God 
to-day, in America, goes before his people. The providential indications, 
as God moves across our continent, are most inspiring to sympathetic and 
devout people. 

And now, in conclusion, it is very pleasant to find one's self the 
mouthpiece of a singularly united and enthusiastic committee. We 
recommend, as a practical application of the strong spirit of Dr. Barrows' 
paper: — 

I. That, as so much has been done by ministers to inculcate the idea 
that religion is to be carried into business, and as it is a poor rule that 
will not work both ways, it is superlatively important that the process be 
reversed, and that from this day we seek to introduce a little more busi- 
ness into religion. We can name one county in which it is believed, by 
an expert in finance, that the gifts to the Society would be quadrupled if 
a committee of laymen could be permitted to lay out the work of raising 



1888. THE 110 ME MISSIONARY. 233 

money for Home Missions among our elm relics, in business fashion. 
When Secretary Clark, in eloquent periods, described our First Home 
Missionary Debt, he incidentally acknowledged help to the amount of 
$0,000, that came easily by the application, on the part of a young man here 
to-day, a member of our Massachusetts legislature, of business principles to 
Home Missionary benevolence. 

We recommend: 

II. That all the moneys contributed by our churches be allowed, 
indeed be directed, to go through the regularly recognized, the properly 
organized denominational channels. Let us be able to touch any point 
in our whole field through some one responsible agency. So far as our 
home-land is concerned, this Missionary Society is the whole Kingdom of 
God to us ! 

But there is another important matter universally conceded: 

HI. The churches must somehow be spared from this vagrant and 
miscellaneous and uncounted and unaccountable presentation of causes. 
When some strolling and worthy Armenian or negro visits us and recites 
the story of his need of help, that he may continue study or build a 
church, that is not the cause of our Home Missionary Society. Xor is 
it to be allowed to take its place or stand in its stead before our j^eople. 
Oh, no. That is not it. It has not the swing, nor the sweep, nor the 
power, nor the eloquent and far-reaching and persuasive voice. 

NATIONAL DAY. 

Finally, and chiefly, and urgently, we recommend the appointment 
and the observance, under the direction of our secretaries, of a National 
Day. Together, upon this Sabbath, attention in our churches, and by 
press reports in our communities, is to be directed to the evangelization 
of our home-land. This observance will promote denominational esprit 
de coiys. The spirit in our churches can be made to rise to the point of 
enthusiastic seizure. We shall be more united in our policy of church 
extension. If the Sabbath become in spirit a genuine National Day, 
a dash and flavor of patriotism will give a new quality to our devotion. 
Churches, as is the custom with some, can be draped and decorated. A 
special supply of information can be provided by the secretaries from our 
laborers in the field. Our feeling is decidedly that this National Day 
shou'd be observed upon the Sabbath succeeding this convention. That 
now lulls upon the second Sunday in June— i.e., Children's Sunday. 
Xow, our churches have a growing interest and enthusiasm in the cele- 
bration of Children's Day. But a very little attention to the matter will 
disclose the truth, that the only, interference with the concerted observ- 
ance of Children's Sunday is the fact tha f its celebration comes so early 
as to be inconvenient for all and impossible for many. Enthusiasm and 
the possibilities of success in its observance would be heightened by 
adopting'a date one week- at least later. Such an arrangement is inevitably 



234 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

making in many churcheB that we can name. It is believed that such an 
adjustment would promote the interests of both societies; certainly there is 
no jealousy between them. In the exercises of this National Day, 
whenever it be held, let laymen be participants. The ladies and young 
people will be given the work of embellishing the church. Let there be 
a large consultation as to the most feasible way of turning the day to large 
account. The musical service will consist of patriotic and of gracious 
hymns. One clergyman who has been pastor of the largest church in 
Essex County, in Massachusetts, uses such a day as is now described to col- 
lect the smaller sums from among the people, taking good pains to see 
that the larger gifts are practically pledged in advance by some such de- 
vice as this: Ho is accustomed to say to one man in his company, "You 
are accustomed to give ten dollars annually to Home Missions. Now, as 
your contribution of labor, will you speak to nine others who ought to 
give a similar amount, telling them how you feel in the matter, and ask- 
ing them to aid you in amassing the sum of one hundred dollars?" A 
man who gives but five dollars is asked to canvass the names of a larger 
company and with reference to a like result. By some expedient we 
must avail ourselves of the instincts and sagacity and experience and 
insight of our most closely disciplined and carefully trained business men. 
These home missionary problems must become their matters, as they now 
too long have been exclusively ours. God never designed that his work 
should be done by a professional set. He is a great Business Doer. The 
time has come for the introduction of new partners into this vast concern 
that is doing business for God. "And the Lord said unto Moses, Gather 
unto me seventy men of the elders of Israel, whom thou knowest to be 
elders of the people, and officers over them; and bring them unto the 
tabernacle of the congregation, that they may stand there with thee. 
. . . And I will take of the Spirit which is upon thee, and will put 
it upon them: another shall bear the burden of the people with thee, 
that thou bear it not thyself alone." . . . And Moses said, "Would 
God that all the Lord's people were prophets, and that the Lord 
would put his Spirit upon them." 



A Straw. — Staid, sober men enjoy some fun. Coming from Cheyenne 
yesterday on the train I sat with a solid, sedate New England banker, 
member of a Congregational church in Massachusetts. He told me that 
he had read with interest a series of articles in The Home Missionary, 
about "The Picnic Parish." Just think of it! Bankers read The 
Home Missionary! He also added, "I read the same story at our home 
missionary concert a few evenings ago, and added a few remarks regard- 
ing the author — whom I had met in Cheyenne, and the church were very 
much pleased. His son is a member of a Cheyenne church. I do not 
believe that even your most dignified reader objects to the "out of the 
usual order" articles, occasionally. — Wyoming. 



1888. THE HUME MISSIONARY. 2'3o 

MISSOURI. 

BYREV. FRANKLIN B. DOB, SUPERINTENDENT FOB MISSOURI, ARKANSAS, AND INDIAN 

TERRITORY. 

Ix .Missouri fifty-nine have borne the Society's commission; in Indian 
Territory, thirteen; in Arkansas, twelve. Total on the district, eighty- 
four. Seventeen ministers have come to the State and nine have left. 
Six churches have been gathered: Hitt, Ritehey, Mine La Motte, the 
Tabernacle in St. Louis, Hyde, and Alba. Four of these are in the 
country and hot in competition with other denominations. They yoke 
with other churches in support of gospel ordinances. It will not do to 
neglect the country entirely, even where there is no village and the 
population scattered, as, left without churches, they heathenize, and are 
tributary to the great centers for good or evil. In such districts it is 
specially needful to care for the young, and they are often numerous. 
The Sunday-school in such localities under the care of the church is an 
agency of special blessing. 

Mine La Motte is a mining town of fifteen hundred souls, and we fur- 
nish the only regular ministration of the Gospel. We have a few influen- 
tial families filling official positions in connection with the mines. A 
good house of worship and a parsonage belong to the proprietor of the 
works, who is of our faith and order, though non-resident. He pays 
seventy-five dollars per month toward the minister's support, and use of 
parsonage. We seemed specially called to enter that field; were fortun- 
ate in our missionary who has rendered valuable service to the com- 
munity and gathered a church of twenty members. A young man in 
the church is already preparing to enter the Chicago Seminary. 

In Alba, ten miles from Carthage, a fine agricultural region, Rev. 
Chas. J. Sage spent a few weeks last winter, visiting families and holding 
special meetings, awakening a wide-spread interest which resulted in the 
gathering of a Sunday-school of one hundred members and then a call 
for a Congregational church, as best adapted to hold the heterogeneous 
elements of the neighborhood. They are already considering the expe- 
diency of building a house of worship. A seminary student will labor 
with them through the summer. 

We cannot say with certainty that any church has reached self-sup- 
port. It is expected that at least four will do so this year: Olivet in 
Kansas City, Church of the Redeemer in St. Louis, Cameron, and Bonne 
Terre. It is a laudable ambition to desire to be off the dependent list, 
and sometimes a Christian duty. The more that attain this dignity, the 
more new work can be entered. In every case the least possible amount 
consistent with efficiency should be asked. Xot smaller salaries nor 
poorer quality of service, but larger paying by the church and congrega- 
tion. There is a liability, especially in rural districts, to pay a mod- 



236 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

erate sum when convenient and not increase the amount as they gain 
in means, or special needs require. It is very important that the con- 
gregation be instructed as to their duty in this line. Seven church 
edifices have been added to our list, six of which are missionary. These 
are Honey Creek, Eiverdale, the Swede, German, and Central in Spring- 
field, Mine La Motte, and Compton Hill in St Louis. A large number 
have been enlarged, or repaired and improved in various ways. Some 
debts have been canceled. Honey Creek built a good house of worship, 
on two acres of land all complete, which was dedicated last May, clear of 
debt, and money in the treasury. No other sanctuary within several 
miles. A large number of young men and women are interested in this 
enterprise. Twenty-six have been added to this church during the year, 
and twenty-one of these from the Sunday-school. 

Eiverdale is an example of similar sucess. A neat and commodious 
house of worship was dedicated last July. A good bell from the Laclede 
Church, which died of excessive holiness, calls the people to the house of 
God. The young church runs two neigborhood Sunday-schools, and 
reports 145 pupils under their care. The contrast between the little old 
log school -house and the present comely edifice is marked indeed, and it 
fairly represents the change in the community. A Sunday-school first, 
then a church, then a "house of worship, then a parsonage, and now fully 
equipped for Christian work, home evangelization, and just the kind of 
church to raise up foreign missionaries. 

The Swede Church in Springfield meets their needs; the German 
Church, completed, dedicated, and paid for, caused much joy. The Cen- 
tral has a fine structure, and more to follow some day, which has caused a 
long and hard struggle; but patience has had her perfect work, and long 
deferred hopes are nearly realized. Four of these churches received 
generous aid from the Union, without which they could not have been. 
This society should have a warm place in our hearts and draw deeper 
from our pockets. We need a quarter of a million annually for this 
work of church and parsonage building, and we are equal to it. Larger 
home missionary outlay calls for more Union aid. They go together. 
Sedalia, Springfield Pilgrim, Alba, the Third Church in St. Louis, 
Olivet, Kansas City, and others, are building or preparing to do so the 
coming year. A church without a sanctuary, even with generous mis- 
sionary aid, is an uncertain thing. 

Contributions from all sources, through the New York treasury, 
reach 85,907.62, which is $1,552.53 in excess of any previous year. Spe- 
cial effort has been made to secure contributions from all the churches, 
and it is gratifying that there are so few delinquents to be reported. 
There are but six such that are operative. The "Webster Groves Church 
leads the State in the average per resident member: total, 8346.75; per 
resident member, 82.69. Kansas City, First Church, comes next: total, 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 237 

$862.64; per resident inember, $2.60. Pilgrim Church, St. Louis, fol- 
lows closely: total, $1,907.45, nearly one-third of the whole amount: per 
resident member, $2.48. Of the missionary churches, Hamilton takes 
the palm: total, £72. 3G; per resident member, $1.72. Kidder follows: 
total, $68.91; per resident member, $1.11. Such is the roll of honor in 
contributions to the American Home Missionary Society for our own 
work in the State. 

The State committee spent a day together in March, considering the 
whole field, discussing each case separately, and voting recommendations 
of grants. The functions of this committee are advisory. They seek to 
adjust and apportion to the whole State wisely and impartially. The 
district committees are held responsible all the same for special and local 
indorsement. The least amount for our home missionary work this 
year was estimated at $20,000, and the estimated contributions $G,500, 
an average of over one dollar per resident member. This leaves 613,500 
from the parent society, $1,000 less than last year, and 83,500 less than 
two years ago. This does not mean smaller outlay nor less work, but 
larger contributions from the field and stronger pressure toward self-sup- 
port. We ought to do more and ask less each year until Missouri reaches 
independence. We shall have the Society's grant plus all our contribu- 
tions. The larger these are, the more work can be done. Missouri is a 
prosperous and growing commonwealth. We ought to plan and do 
larger things and rise to the height of our opportunities. There are not 
less than twenty towns of importance, outside of the largest cities, where 
we have no churches, which we might wisely enter if we had the means. 
Kansas City will start another soon; Sedalia, Springfield, and St. Louis 
ere long. We have reached the period of easy and wise enlargement. 
Conditions have changed. Progress is the law and the present watch- 
word. Hence, the city missionary societies and Congregational clubs in 
St. Louis and Kansas City. These indicate a new order of things and 
advance all along the line. They only need wise adjustment, so as to 
co-operate for a given result, mutually helpful and not antagonistic. 
The plans aud methods of ten years ago will not do for Missouri to-day. 
We are in the period of enlargement and consolidation and higher style 
of work, and not of feebleness, experiment, and uncertainty. Of the 
twenty-four churches that might be located, we must start at least eight 
in important centers. Missouri is evidently coming more to the front, 
where she belongs, in all natural resources, industrial pursuits, and edu- 
cational facilities. The tide is setting toward this center of the continent. 
Immigration conventions have been held in different parts of the State, 
and the result will be a rapid increase of population. The next ten years 
will show great advance. We must adapt ourselves to the coming oppor- 
tunities and needs. In this connection, it is fitting to allude to Kidder 
Institute, the only one of the kind that we have in the State, and 



238 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

which riglitiully claims our attention. With no endowment and no aid 
from the American Home Missionary Society, and doing a high grade of 
work, she has a right to expect generous aid in erecting buildings and 
help toward support of teachers. It is not simply a local school, but an 
academy for the State. It lias important relations to our home mis- 
sionary work. 

Nor should Drury College be forgotten. Indeed, she must have the 
foremost place as a vital force in our denominational work, and as an 
honor to the State. It is evident that in the general advance movement, 
Drury College cannot stand still, but should rather be in the lead. The 
trustees will adopt the best methods for securing necessary funds. The 
most of us can do but little in that line, but we owe the college a grate- 
ful duty. Every one of us, every little church, should be in warm 
sympathy with the institution and be proud of it, giving such as we have; 
if not silver and gold, then what is better — our hearts' love and kind 
words and thoughtful attention. The pastor, the deacons, the Sunday- 
school superintendent, can speak of it and help make it known to the 
community, and seek out and encourage promising youths to become 
pupils. We have the welfare of this college largely in our own hands. 
The institution belongs to us and we to it. The constituency largely 
makes the college. We should aim for nothing less than Amherst, Wil- 
liams, Oberlin, or Yale. 



HOW A REVIVAL BEGAN. 

Several prayer-meetings had been held in which prayer had been 
made for the revival of blessing in the church. Especially was it insisted 
upon that previous preparation was needed for the meeting. At length, 
at the close of one very interesting meeting, an expression was asked 
from those who were willing during the coming week to remember 
specially the church, and pray for a revival in the church. 

Of course a great many hands went up, and there was some reason to 
fear that many pledged themselves thoughtlessly. During the coming 
week the topic was ever coming up in the pastor's mind. He wondered 
how it would fare with all if Gideon's test were applied to any meeting. 
The sight of several rooms adjoining the vestry suggested to him a plan 
as he went into the church that second evening. He opened the service 
by asking how many had prayed every day, especially and earnestly, for 
the revival needed. It was noticeable that many hands were not raised 
this time. Some had remembered the subject the first day; others for 
two days, but comparatively few the whole week. 

Then he read and commented on Judges vii., and suggested that per- 
haps their prayers were not answered because of deficiencies in their own 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 239 

hearts. "Are you really ready to have this blessing we ask? I propose 
that we all submit ourselves to a test as a measure dl' personal examina- 
tion. Let us divide ourselves into four separate meetings. 

"The children of Israel could not fight well if their ranks were Idled 
with the timid. Perhaps we, loo, have been disheartened. Let all of us 
then who are discouraged or timid, or are afraid the Lord is not going to 
hless us this year, go into class room A. 

'•'Then let all who are conscious that they came to this meeting 
to-night in an indifferent, self-indulgent, thoughtless mood, make up a 
contingent for class-room B. Let them choose their leader, and betake 
themselves to prayer for an earnest spirit of consecration. 

'" We will form another class for room 0. I have yet one more test. 
•Are our hearts right toward one another? Criticism, and complaint, 
and backbiting, and mutual alienations, are everywhere endangering the 
church of Christ. Yv'e cannot expect, we cannot pray with any faith 
for a revival in our church, with any divisions. This very afternoon 
(and here his voice trembled) one of our number poured into my ear a 
hitter complaint against a sister. Let all of us wdio are unwilling to for- 
give, or unwilling to ask forgiveness from those we have injured; let all 
who have complained against, and criticised their fellow members; let 
any who have spread false reports; let all who are conscious of a feeling 
of bitterness or alienation, — retire to class-room C to pray for forgiveness 
and cry for strength to become reconciled. We will sing two verses of 
the hymn, ' Am I a Soldier of the Cross ?' during which those who belong 
to the more fearful and cowardly will retire to class-room A." 

An awful hush followed these words, and many angry faces <mve 
suspicion of inflicted wounds. But suddenly the meeting took a strange 
and affecting turn. Brother K— , one of the very salt of the church, 
rose and confessed tremblingly that he had for the past month been dis- 
couraged and full of fear, and could see that he was in the way. Sister 
C— said, as she started down the aisle, "Pray for me, a coward." 
Somehow or other the angry faces were first filled with surprise, and then 
shame, and as the hymn was started up, by one, and twos, and threes, 
they slowly filed into class-room A. 

"Now," said the pastor, "while we sing two verses of (he hymn, 
•' Must Jesus bear the Cross alone V let the indifferent and self-indulgent 
gather in their prayer room." 

Hardly had these words died on his lips before young brother Henry 
G_ started, saying, "God has shown me myself straining everything for 
self, doing as I pleased, and bearing nothing but leaves for God. I am 
a sad stumbling-block." 

Xo one ventured to start the hymn, and amid a silence profoundly 
solemn, their ranks were still further thinned. 

" I must myself lead the third company," said the pastor. "I heard 



240 THE HOME MISSIONARY September, 

last week that two were finding fault with me, and my heart has been 
full of bitterness. I will this night seek them." 

As he left the desk and walked down the aisle, tears came to many 
eyes, but when the two deacons followed their pastor, the procession was 
like the journey through the Valley of Baca. One went out of the house, 
a woman who would not forgive, and who slammed the door behind her. 

Only three were left in the large room, and they obscure members, 
who, instead of praying for the rest, with earnest cries besought God to 
make them more consecrated. 

They used to say in after days that the great revival begau that night. 
N. Y. Observer, quoted from Kansas Telephone, 



NEW LEAFLETS. 



NO. 6$. PRACTICAL BENEFICEXCK. MRS. FRANK RUSSELL. 
50 cents per hundred. 

Extracts. — From the earliest ages God has been worshiped 
by offerings, and these offerings as ordained were systematic and 
proportionate. Abraham, 400 years before the giving of the Mosaic 
law, gave tithes of all he possesssed, and 200 years afterward Jacob gave 
one tenth of his income to God. This setting apart of one tenth of 
their substance was demanded in the Old Testament and directly sanc- 
tioned by our Savior in the New Testament. It was was also obseiwed in 
the early Christian church, as stated by Origen, Jerome, Augustine, 
Chrysostom, and others. This law, so venerable with age, has never 
been repealed, and many think it is as binding on us as on them, and 
has the same foundation as the Sabbath, in that they are both of the 
Lord; one tenth of our income and one seventh of our time belonging to 
him. He has placed us here as stewards, and to him Ave shall be held 
accountable for the proper use of our means. The question then comes 
home to every one of us, In wJiat way can we best follow God's will in 
our beneficences? . . . 

There are many reasons why we should regulate our beneficence. It 
will ennoble our secular life; we shall be able to do more good to others, 
and become more interested in the objects upon which we our bestow giv- 
ing' we shall be more careful in the selection of those objects, and shall 
become more like our divine benefactor who went about doing good. 

uncle john's soliloquy 
reveals an important truth. He says: "Why didn't I see this thing 
before? Ten dollars for Foreign Missions, and one year ago I gave only 
fiftv cents; and that half dollar hurt me so much, and came so reluc- 
tantlv! And the ten dollars— why, it is a real pleasure to hand it over to 
the Lord! And this comes from keeping an account with the Lord. I 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 241 

am so glad Brother Smith preached that sermon. lie said we should all 
find it a good thing to have a treasury in the house from which to draw 
whenever our contributions are solicited. He asked us to try the experi- 
ment for one year— to 'set apart a certain portion of our income for the 
Lord's work.' I thought it over. I thought about those Jews and the 
one tenth they gave into the Lord's treasury. I thought what a mean, 
closefisted Jew I should have made had I lived in those days. Then 1 
counted up all I had given for the year and it was just three dollars. 
Three dollars! and I had certainly raised from my farm clear of all 
expenses, 11,200. Three dollars is one four hundredth part of $1,200. 
The more I thought, the wider I opened my eyes. Said I, ' I am not 
quite ready for the Jews' one tenth, but I will try one twentieth and see 
how it works.' I got a big envelope and I put it down in the corner of 
my trunk, and as soon as I could I put the $60 into it. Said I, ' Here 
goes for the Lord.' It cost me a little something to say it at firsts but 
when it was done, how good I felt over it ! "When the appeals came for 
missions, all I had to do was just to run to my treasury and get the money. 
And this all comes from keeping an account with the Lord. How he 
has blessed me this year ! I never had better crops. Now I am going to 
try another plan. I am going to give the Lord the profits from one acre, 
one of my best yearlings, and one tenth of the profits from my orchard. 
That will surely carry his fund up to $75, and if it doesn't I will make it 
up from something else." 

. . . We should not give from the mere enthusiasm of the moment 
or from over-persuasion, but from deep-seated principle. . „ . The 
secret motive power that should prompt us to give of our time, our labor, 
and our money for the sake of others should be the thought that, as 
Christ gave himself for us, we may do something for others. . . . 
We should educate our children from earliest years in the duty and privi- 
lege of practical giving. They should early learn to give as the Lord has 
given them, in gifts received and in what they earn, to lay aside a pro- 
portion as a thank-offering. It may appropriately be done every Sunday 
morning at the family altar, thus consecrating it as a part of worship; 
then would giving grow sweet and become a principle which would grow 
with the years of the child and strengthen as youth advanced, never to 
be eradicated. 

If we are thus to have a thorough devotion in our giving, the channels 
cherished and honored in our churches will be dear to our hearts. Every 
church is an organized committee in behalf of specific work for our bene- 
ficent causes, of which we now have the sacred number seven. Any per- 
son wrought upon by the Spirit of God will desire to have fellowship in 
the work of the redemption of the whole world. We have many 
churches which single out two or three of the group and minister to them 
lavishly, while several others are turned from their door, shivering, with 



242 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

scarcely a crumb. This incongruity, however, is beginning to receive 
attention. The list of all the seven causes should be the schedule for 
every organization. The church collections should reach each one 
successively during the year; the Sunday-school should- have each one 
brought before it, and every beneficent society in the church, of the 
women and the you ng people, or the children, should include in their 
active functions every one of the seven objects. 



THE GROUND-HOG SKIN. 

See "'The Home Missionary" for June. 

Philo's plan for this "Missouri Pelt Fund" seems to meet with 
popular favor. 

Brunswick, Maine, June 1, 1888. 
Please add the inclosed five dollars to the Missouri Pelt Fund, in 
memory of one, poor in the goods of this world, but rich toward God. 
One dollar from C. C. D., Colchester, Mass. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., June 7,1888. 

We have just read in The Home Missionary about the ground-hog 
skin, and we would like to own it for a few minutes. My sister Elsie 
and I, send twenty-five cents each, and my brother Howard, ten cents. 
With a hope that the skin will bring in many dollars, — Margery Strong. 

True children of the "father of Our Country"! 

Worthington, Minn., June 9, 1888. 
I am glad that somebody has spoken! I could not bear that the poor 
woman's gift, — a gift doubtless of love and faith, — should count nothing 
in the Lord's treasury. I want an interest in it, though it must be small. 
Please let me own that pelt, if it be but for one hour. I inclose twenty- 
five cents. You and I, dear Home Missionary, are old friends. We 
have known each other these sixty years. My now sainted father was a 
gospel worker under your care, in Michigan, for fourteen years. You 
are a welcome visitor in my family, and will be such as long as I live. — 
Mrs. L. H Clarh. 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y., June 13, 1888. 

I was much interested in your account of the dear Southern woman who 

contributed the ground-hog pelt to the American Home Missionary 

Society. Verily, "she hath done what she could." Philo has set us a 

good example, to encourage and cheer her heart, — and I, too, follow with 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 343 

real pleasure. Please find inclosed five dollars. Do /own the pelt now? 
— An invalid and a widow. 

Yes, you own it until the next contributor claims it, and here he 
comes! 

Newburyport, Mass., June 13, 1888. 
Please find inclosed fifteen dollars from three friends, to be added to 
the Missouri Pell Fund. I am trying to interest others in the pelt. — 
A Friend. 

Stratford, Ct., June 14, 1888. 
Inclosed find two dollars toward the Missouri Pelt Fund, and that 
it may indeed be a" growing chestnut, " not lacking for want of resources, 
is the prayer of a friend. — M. D. 

Toledo, Ohio, June 19, 1888. 
Please add three dollars for me to the Missouri Pelt Fund. I doubt 
not that the Holy Spirit suggested the gift, and led the Missionary to 
accept it. May the same blessed Spirit move many hearts to contribute 
to the glorious cause of Home Missions! — Mrs. N. M. L. 

Muscatine, la., June 25, 1888. 
I wish to help swell that poor southern woman's contribution to 
Home Missions, and inclose five dollars to join the Missouri Pelt Fund 
Company. — A Friend. 

Cherokee, Iowa, June 30, 1888. 
I have been greatly interested in the letters written about that ground- 
hog pelt, the gift of a poor Christian woman who had "nothing to give" 
until the animal came into her possession, when she " skinned him 
and tanned the skin" with her own hands. I was especially interested 
in the communication from "Philo," and gladly inclose five dollars for 
temporary ownership. I hope the money already paid to the society for 
that pelt will be many times multiplied by five before the Missouri Pelt 
Fund is closed in February, 1889. What a change would come to our 
Lord's treasury if every woman of us all should " feel dreadfully " 
because we give so little, and should imitate this poor woman, and cast 
in all we can, and at the cost of some personal sacrifice! — C. E. W. 

Georgetown - , Mass., July 1, 1888. 
Inclosed please find one dollar for the "Missouri Pelt Fund " from the 
Young Ladies' Home Missionary Society of this place. — Alice A. Wildes. 
Sec. and Treas. 



244 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

Cheshire, Ct., July 9, 1888. 

In a Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor, the story of your 
" Missouri Pelt " was related recently. I am desirous of having the 
honor of being the "temporary owner" of that pelt until it is claimed 
by "the next."— E. H. B. 

Vermont, July 10, 1888. 

I am " Only waiting till the shadows are a little longer grown," but 
my heart goes out to that hidden disciple who "hath done what she 
could." Please find five dollars inclosed for the "Missouri Pelt Fund." 

Missouri Pelt Fund, July 10, 1888, $55.85. 



FROM A SWEDISH STUDENT. 

The following, addressed to Superintendent Montgomery, is from a Swedish student 
Mr. E. M. Carlson, of Chicago Theological Seminary, laboring at Pecatonica, Still 
man Valley, Illinois. 

"The Lord is gracious, and full of compassion ; slow to anger and of 
great mercy. The Lord is good to all ; and his tender mercies are over 
all his works." 

David did not say any too much of his blessed Lord in those verses. 
Every human being ought to join him. and out of the depth of the soul 
say that the Lord is gracious. He is very gracious to me. 

I am glad to tell you that I was very kindly received" in this place. 
Here are not very many who go to the mission house, but those who 
belong to us are, with few exceptions, very true and upright Christians. 

In Stillman Valley, a greater number go to the mission house. They 
too, received me gladly. While I was there the meetings were attended 
by from fifty to eighty persons every meeting. In that place there is no 
other work among the Swedes. Many young people live there who go to 
the mission house, but they are, with few exceptions, living the life of 
this world. I pray to my dear Lord that some of them may be saved 
this summer and become sons of God. 

I am very well pleased with the country and the surroundings here. 
I am strong and healthy. May God give me the wisdom I need to do 
faithful work for my dear Savior ! I thank God that he is with me, 

blessing me always. 

♦ 

Within Reach. — The sewing machine has arrived in good condi- 
tion. My wife, after trying it, says it exceeds her highest expectation — 
she is charmed with its ornamental appearance, its simplicity, and the 
perfect ease with which she can work it. It is certainly every thing it 
was represented to be. I am convinced that more of the home mission- 
aries would avail themselves of this opportunity if they but knew about 
it. I thank you for thus bringing a good machine within reach of my 
means and home. — Kansas. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 245 

"FROM AN OUTSIDER." 

Missionary Griffiths, pastor of the Congregational Church at 
Alturas (California), has passed scarcely an idle moment since he came 
here four years ago, and the result of his work can be seen on every 
hand. He has labored early and late to assist the people here, and 
has traveled nearly every Sunday in the year to preach the Gospel in 
other places. During the past summer he has on three Sundays in 
every month, arisen at daybreak, traveled twenty, and twenty-five 
miles, preached to the people, and traveled the distance back, and 
favored his own people with an eloquent discourse in the evening, and 
with all his ministerial duties, he finds time to minister to the wants of 
his flock. Not only does he work hard at his calling, but he is in no wise 
averse to manual labor; for of late he has for several days in succession 
taken his axe and team and gone into the timber, felled a tree, chopped 
it into firewood, and hauled it home, rarely arriving at his fireside until 
far into the night. 

Perhaps some one will say/' Why shouldn't he ? He is as well able 
to work as I am." This may be true, but do you ever take into consid- 
eration that he is about the hardest worked and poorest paid man in the 
community ? Do you stop to consider, that if you were in 'iistress, 
Missionary Griffiths would never be too tired, too cold, or too hungry to 
go to your assistance ? And that he would work with you, stay with you, 
and pray with you? 

And now we ask, do we ideally appreciate the work of these mission- 
ary men as we should? — Modoc Independent. 



THE PAPER MISSION AND WHAT CAME OF IT. 

BY MISS NANCY MARSH, 31 SHELDON St., PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

We have sent out the past year to twenty-four States and Territories, 
3,649 papers and pamphlets, 438 lesson papers, 753 tracts leaflets, etc., 
121 Scripture pictures and Christmas cards, and 32 books. Postage for 
same, $19.01. We have written 118 letters, and 67 postal cards. Con- 
tributions, including postage, $92.44. 

For the past seven years we have carried very heavy burdens, owing 
to the many calls for aid which we could not give. Having reached our 
three score and ten years, feeling more and more the infirmities of the flesh* 
we decided to lay down some of these burdens, and send only reading 
matter, as was our first design. But we had hardly reached this conclusion 
when an appeal came from a church in Missouri to aid them by fancy 
articles for a fair. The church had struggled two years for self-support, 



246 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

and if they could tide over this hard place, would succeed. With others 
we came to the rescue, and about thirteen dollars' worth of fancy articles 
were sent, which were "all sold." The pastor says, " We start out on our 
third year of self-support with bright prospects before us. It will be a 
hard struggle for a while longer, but we are safe. We shall never forget 
your ladies. God bless you all who have helped us in this time of need." 

About the same time an appeal came from a pastor in Kansas, asking 
aid to build a church. He wrote, " We have read your report in The 
Home Missionary and see how much you have helped others. We wish 
you could help us. The people have done their utmost to erect a church 
in so short a time, but this being their first year in the country they have 
no crops. We have no place of worship but an opera hall which is used 
Saturday evenings and has to be cleaned out for service Sabbath morn- 
ing. There are eight saloons in this small town, and shooting on the 
street is quite common. Even while I write, a young man lies dead, shot 
through the heart. He is a stranger from New York State — ' Somebody's 
son.' Will you, for the Lord's sake, help us by interesting your many 
friends in our behalf ? The people in their poverty have done all they 
can." Surely here was a needy case; but where was the money? We 
never have an extra dollar on hand to send ior these many and varied 
calls, so we always have to ask, ' Lord, what wilt thou have me to do ' ? 
The answer came very unexpectedly. We received a letter from a lady in 
Franklin, Mass., saying, I was much interested in reading the report of 
the Paper Mission and want to contribute a little to help the work along, 
but wish to be sure of your address so the money will reach you safely." 
We read that word money twice. No mistake about that word, sure! 
Whether we were to receive fifty cents or ten dollars we knew not, but we 
said, " The Lord means us to help that church." The reply to our letter 
soon came with five dollars, wishing it was much more. From other 
sources we received various sums amounting to $43. The church Avas 
finally dedicated. The pastor writes, Jan. 29th, "We have good con- 
gregations even in the severe cold weather; church crowded morning and 
evening. At the latter service numbers cannot get in, and there are 
crowds around the door. The Lord has been very good to us. To-day I 
received the grant from the A. C. IT. I cannot tell you how happy we 
are; my wife actually cried, and I shouted for joy and threw up my hat like 
a schoolboy. I have been ashamed to meet the people we were owing; 
now I can once more lift up my head. Praise the Lord ! How good and 
kind every body has been to us. We do ask the Lord to bless and reward 
them all, and are sure He will." 

We have had twenty letters and postals from different States asking 
where papers could be sent ; we have replied to all these. Several have 
sent to places suggested, and much good has been done. Magazines and 
papers have been sent to Kidder Institute, in which we are much inter- 
ested, and have been greatly appreciated, and very helpful. The Prin- 



1888. THE HOME MISS1 VARY. 5447 

eipal writes, "We would be glad to receive copies of the standard poets, 
and others, if any one has them to spare. Last winter we received a 
box of books and valuable magazines, but did not know where they came 
from, if you know who sent them (we do not) please thank them, for we 
have found them very valuable in our work. Our fall term has just 
closed. It has been the most successful in our history; a number of our 
young men expect to study for the ministry. It is when I need help for 
such that I feel my poverty. I firmly believe God has a great work for 
our Institute to do in this country, and that he will lead kind friends to 
come to our aid." 

From Siloam Springs, Arkansas, we have grateful acknowledgment 
of papers. " Such are gladly welcomed and eagerly read by our young 
people." 

From Indian Territory, and many other places, we have received let- 
ters of gratitude for the reading matter sent and the help it has afforded. 

We have sent literature to Puget Sound Academy in Washington Ter- 
ritory. Others have also become interested in this institution and have 
sent valuable reading matter. The librarian writes: "Your papers are 
received and are truly acceptable ; a friend has sent a number of the 
'Golden Rule' which promises to be of real benefit." 

We have been deeply interested in these academies that are training 
so many of our youth for a noble Christian life and for usefulness in the 
world. There are many other items of interest from this Territory. 
From a small inland town a lady writes : " One encouragement here is, 
that a good many young men from the eastern States, and older men liv- 
ing by themselves, seem glad to get religious papers. I have distributed 
among them all the papers you have sent since last Spring. I always 
like to have some ready to give them when they drop into the Sunday- 
school or church ; they thank me very politely and seem glad to get them. 
There are many infidels here, and they sow their papers broadcast. We 
must try to be first in putting good reading matter into the hands of 
these children and youth. We are trying hard for a Sunday-school 
library. When we came here about two years ago there was only a log 
school-house to worship in, and the people were so utterly indifferent to 
all religious influences that our hearts almost failed us. We promptly 
organized a Sunday-school, which was carried on last summer, until the 
winter rains set in, when it was closed, but opened again the first of 
April th is year. Very often husband and I have the entire school on our 
hands, no older people coming out. The children are interested, and in 
them is our hope. If we can keep up this interest in the Sunday-school 
a few years longer, there will be a different class of people here. At 
present we are the only Christian family in the neighborhood, though 
many have come from Christian homes in the East. We have preaching 
every two weeks. When preaching and the Sunday-school were new 
things people came from far and near, but only till their curiosity was 



248 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

satisfied. We have from twenty to thirty children quite regularly in 
Sunday-school, and when there is preaching all stay for service. We can 
sow the seed and some of it may take root and bear fruit after many 
days/' God bless these noble workers and give them great success! 

Duty, the pony, has also a home in this Territory. He has earned a 
good reputation, being much engaged in Sunday-school work, and is 
known throughout the region as the "Sunday-school pony." He knows 
nearly every locality in the county. "He enjoys music, I conclude," 
says the missionary, "for one Sabbath evening, returning from the hills 
where I had organized two schools that day, I drove by brother F.'s 
chapel towards his house, but Duty didn't want to go by. He wheeled 
round, put his head over the fence as much as to say, 'Don't you hear 
them singing in there? This is the place for you to stop.' I was quite sur- 
prised, for I had never stopped there, and he had traveled nearly all day 
and was but a few rods from the barn where I had often unsaddled him. 
I have become very much attached to him," 

We have been much interested in a lumberman who was converted 
about two years ago. He says: "I worked one year in the lumber woods 
of Canada, and six years in Michigan, but T. never saw a missionary in 
the camp, nor was there one to ask, ' Are you [a Christian ?' until I was 
compelled to live in town; then the Lord sent that good Brother S. to 
tell me that Jesus loved me and gave Himself for me. I intend to pro- 
claim the glad tidings to those men who are in darkness, that they may 
be rescued from their perishing condition." This man when converted 
felt the need of more education, and, though he lias a wife and child to 
support and very small means, has studied two years, and is now laboring 
in a lumber camj) in Michigan. He writes: "I preached in the camp 
last night and the men listened with the greatest attention. There are 
about forty in camp now, mostly foreigners. They will soon break up 
and go where there are over a hundred men. Get as many Christians as 
you can to pray for me, that I may have power to win souls to Christ." 

We are deeply interested in a mining camp in Indiana. The mission- 
ary was himself a miner, and set apart a portion of his time to study for 
the ministry while working in the mines. He organized a church in a 
small village, and for three years has been very successful, but was 
requested to leave that and take up work for the miners, for which he is so 
well adapted. He writes: "The field is a very hard one — dark, desti- 
tute and wicked; nothing but the love of Christ could induce me to 
accept such a field. Already we have a church, two Sunday-schools, tem- 
perance societies, etc. Some of the miners are very intelligent, and 
great readers, and such reading matter as you send will do them good. 
The fields are white to the harvest, but where are the reapers? I am 
trying to do the work of two men and want to do still more for the Master. 
Some of the children are very bright and I hope soon to see what can be 
done for them. The light is breaking already, for God is in the work." 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 249 

Three little children gave us two dollars, for two missionary children in 
Kansas. The father writes, "They were wild with joy when I gave them 
each a silver dollar; they thought they could buy 'every thing.' T. 
invested his in a hand wagon. All our food, etc., has to be brought 
from town, and they charge from twenty- five to sixty cents to bring the 
smallest article; so T. has saved us many a dime by his wagon. He has 
done good service also in hauling stones for our church and parsonage 
yards. Many thanks to the three children." 

Last winter we received from a German woman in Iowa two pairs of 
woolen socks. She spun the yarn (wool from her own sheep), knit the 
socks, and, not having much money to give, sent these as a gift for some 
needy person. They were sent to a Welsh Home Missionary in Minne- 
sota, who was feeble and needed warm clothing. He writes, "We are 
glad and most thankful for the socks; they are very good. May God 
bless the one who made them. The winter is very severe." 

We would like to put missionaries in about one hundred places, which 
are destitute of any means of grace, — no church, no Sunday-school, — 
where mothers are saying, "For twenty years we have been burying our 
dead without a prayer at the grave, and wondering, if there are Christians 
in the world, why they don't come and help us." There are always cases 
of sickness and need among our missionaries, where a dollar or so would 
bring comfort and relief, and we are always grateful when the Lord opens 
the way to help such. $12.25 have been thus dispensed, which proved a 
great blessing. We wish it had been much more. The infant class has 
kept up a lively iuterest in our work, supplying us with children's papers 
and $7 for postage. 

Eight years ago last mouth we commenced our "Paper Mission." 
As we think of the host of workers, the missionaries, the teachers, the 
Freedmen, the institutions of learning, the reading rooms, the mining 
camps, the lumber camps, in our own land, besides many places in foreign 
lands, and the sailors that have come to us from Iceland, Sweden, Fin- 
land, and the islands of the sea, — we are almost overwhelmed with the 
greatness of the work, the opportunities given, the responsibilities laid 
upon us, and we ask "Who is sufficient for these things?" But when 
we think how God has blessed us from the first, and of the help, and the 
helpers he has given both here at home and all over the land, who have 
responded so cheerfully to our many calls, without which the work could 
not have been carried on, and when we read the grateful letters from 
these workers, — we are constrained to feel that this is the Lord's 
work, and we hope to abide with God in this calling while our strength 
lasts, or we receive a new commission from the Master; and we feel sure 
that all who have helped us in any way to carry on our work will receive 
a rich blessing. We have carried many heavy burdens these eight years, 
beside those left at the post-office, and those have not always been light; 
but we have learned as never before that God is true to his promise, and 



250** THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

that no case is too hard for him. So we bless him for the work, for its 
success, and would say with the psalmist, " Not unto us, Lord, not 
unto us, but unto thy name give glory, for thy mercy and for thy truth's 
sake." 



A Dakota Invitation. — Dear Friend. — What sort of a Christian do 
you want to be ? 

Have you a burning desire to aid some one in his Christian walk ? 
Then come ! let us feel the warmth of your Christian love in the prayer 
meeting ! 

Have you grown cold and negligent of your duty towards God ? Then 
come and let us aid you in that Christian life. 

Do you wish in any way to identify yourself with Christian workers ? 
Come to the prayer meeting. — Sincerely, Your Pastor, C. M. Daley. 



BAD PRAYERS. 



I do not like to hear him pray 

On bended knee about an hour 
For grace to spend aright the day 

Who knows his neighbor has no flour. 

I'd rather see him go to mill 

And buy the luckless brother bread. 
And see his children eat their rill 

And laugh beneath their humble shed. 

I do not like to hear him pray, 

" Let blessings on the "widow be," 
Who never seeks her home, to say, 

" If want o'ertake you, come to me." 

I hate the prayer so loud and long 

That's offered for our country's weal 
By him who sees it cursed by wrong, 

And only with his lips doth feel. 

I do not like to hear her pray 

With jeweled ear and silken dress, 
While Gospel Workers toil all day, 

And then are asked to toil for less. 

I do not like these soulless prayers ; 

If wrong, I hope to be forgiven — 
No angel wing such upward bears: 

They're lost a million miles from heaven. 

Adapted from The Hartford Times. 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Roman's Department 



-.'.M 




KOCKT MOUNTAINS. A CABIN IN WHICH MRS. PICKETT AND HER FAMILY LIVED EIGHT MONTHS. 




A FEW OP MRS. TICKETT'S COW EOTS. 



252 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

Through the kindness of Mrs. J. W. Pickett, White Water, Colorado, 
we present to our readers this month, two illustrations which will brkig 
to mind, with man} 7 , her thrilling story of Rocky Mountain experiences. 
It will be remembered that the collectidn of $450 taken at tlte ladies' 
meeting at Saratoga, is to help build a chapel for the use of the little 
church which was organized by Mrs. Pickett. One room of this chapel 
is to be fitted up as a reading-room for her staunch friends — the cow-boys. 



OREGON AND WASHINGTON. 

In connection with the fortieth session of the General Association of 
Oregon and Washington, an afternoon session was held by the woman's 
home and foreign missionary societies. Mrs. J. F. Ellis, vice-president of 
the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, presided during the devotional 
exercises for the first half hour. Mrs. Geo. H. Atkinson, president of the 
Woman's Home Missionary Society, took the chair. An interesting 
report by Mrs. N. F. Cobleigh was read by Mrs. Sanderson. A carefully 
prepared paper by Mrs. H. P. Tucker, of Arlington, Oregon, on the sub- 
ject of "Home Missions," was read by Miss Edith Sanderson, after 
which the president gave a review of the work for the past year. Mrs. 
Ellis again took charge of the meeting. First on the programme was a 
children's home missionary concert exercise, "To the Eescue," which 
was admirably rendered and was an excellent feature of the hour. 
Twenty-five misses and youths participated, who severally performed their 
parts with credit to themselves and to Mrs. M. A. Kelly, who had sole 
charge of their preparation. 

The exercise was one prepared by Rev. C. C. Otis, late of Seattle. 
Twenty-five children took part in this exercise. Ray Foster represented 
California, Nellie Gillette, Oregon, and Blanche Treen, Washington 
Territory. Maurice Case represented "Immigration," Hillman Case, 
"Socialism," Frank Foster, et Mormonism," and Paul Harper, " Intem- 
perance" — the four evils which threaten our nation to its very heart's 
core — each inscription borne aloft upon a symbolically colored banner. 
As a remedy for these evils, four girls came bearing Bibles and a banner 
upon which was inscribed, "Christ for the World." The responsive 
singing and recitations, the conflict between the good and ' evil forces 
continued, until finally the little girls presented Bibles to the boys bearing 
the evil devices, which signified their overthrow, and left Christ's banner 
waving victoriously over the field. The conception of the exercise was 
fine, and the execution good in all respects. 

The exercises of the afternoon were of the most interesting character, 
and were listened to with close attention by a good audience. 



1888. Til E IK) ME MISSIONARY. 253 

The secretary of this society, Mrs. Atkinson, feeling the need of more 
earnest effort in behalf of Home Missions, has originated a plan to secure 
pledges of a cent a day from each member of the churches. She hopes 
through this arrangement to lift the cause from embarrassment, and fill 
the treasury. She commenced with Plymouth Church, Portland, Oregon. 
The church is small and poor, but she found a ready and hearty response. 
When she approached other churches she found the same spirit even with 
the poorest members of the smallest churches. ' Of course,' says this 
earnest worker, " it will require time to secure the name of every mem- 
ber, but something has been accomplished, and we intend to go on. We 
have been in this work forty years, and are still trying to do with our 
might what our hands find to do. If this plan of " a cent a day " might 
be carried out in all our churches, the result would be an overflowing 
treasury, and a rich blessing to our own souls." 



NEW YORK. 



The President of the New York Woman's Home Missionary Union — 
Mrs. Kincaid — has issued a circular letter to her auxiliaries, both inspir- 
ing and suggestive. She urges the Congregational women of New York 
State to renewed zeal in this "inviting work" of extending Christ's 
kingdom in our land. She says: — "We believe that 'the fate of the 
world is to be decided where we are,' that' America christianized means 
the world christianized.' We would therefore lend a hand in this 
' mighty emergency' which is upon us as a nation. In no way have we 
thought this could better be done than by collecting money for the 
National Societies of our Congregational body, hence we undertake no 
independent work. 

"The new year opens with a call upon this Union for $5,500. With 
this money we shall be able to support two home missionaries upon the 
frontier, a teacher among the Bohemians, one in Utah, one among the 
Indians, a general missionary among the Mountain whites and another 
among the Freedmen. Beside these salaries, we can help in pushing the 
work of our Sunday-school and Publishing Society in planting new schools, 
can give a little to the College and Education Society, can help build a 
church in California and a parsonage in Dakota, and have $800 left to 
divide between the A. H. M. S., the A. M. A. and the New West." 



MICHIGAN. 



The treasurer of the Woman's Home Missionary Society of this State, 
Mrs. Grabill, in a letter inclosing a draft, expresses her joy that Michigan 



254 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

has given so liberally to the work this year. She says: " I am so glad for 
the officers of the A. H. M. S., for the missionaries, for the gospel - 
ry people, and for our own Michigan folks, and for the good that 
this giving has done those who have give/,. I have received much from 
poor churches. The children have taken hold with a zest. We find that 
teaching people to give helps dependent churches to self-support." 

We advise those who wish to interest children in Home Missions to 
send for a sample of the very attractive map card, published by the 
Michigan Woman's Union, and the "Lessons in Home Missions for 
Young People." Address Miss Alice M. Warren, Olivet, Mich., who is 
the secretary of the Young People's Department. Why may not other 
States add to their list of officers, a lady to organize and superintend the 
work among the young people? 



STORY OF A MISSION BAND. 

" God did anoint thee with his odorous oil, 
To wrestle not to reign; and He assigns 
All thy tears over, like pure crystallines, 
For younger fellow-workers of the soil 
To wear as amulets. So others shall 
Take patience, labor, to their hearts and hands, 
From thy hands, and thy heart, and thy brave cheer, 
And God's grace fructify through thee, to all. 
The least flower with a brimming cup, may stand 
And share its dew-drop with another near." E. S. 

A few years since, a dear Christian lady said, " I should like to do 
something more for the Master, but as I have thought it over, I see no 
department of Christian work that is neglected except that of children's 
mission work, and as I have never had any experience in that direction, 
I fear to undertake it." After further reflection, and, we doubt not. 
much prayer on the subject, she decided to do "what her hands found 
to do," and in the spring of 1885 was organized the Children's Mission 
Band of the First Congregational Church of Northfield, Minnesota. It 
consisted of about thirty little girls between the ages of five and fourteen 
years. Catching the spirit of their leader, they adopted the name of 
"Willing Workers," which they well deserve. All offices except that of 
president, are held by themselves, and the money raised during the first 
six months of the year is devoted to Home Missions, and that of the 
second six months, to Foreign Missions. Their meetings are held the 
first Sabbath in each month, the leader aiming to give instruction in 
the work of missions, and at the same time to make them as inter- 
esting and entertaining as possible. Letters are read, and items of imfor- 
mation are given from the different missionary publications. The chil- 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

dren are often askod to bring some interesting story, which they must 
find themselves. These exercises, together with singing, Scripture read- 
ing and some form of prayer, constitute the programme. At the end of 
six months they have a genera] review, and the leader is much encouraged 
to see that many of the lessons have not been forgotten. Each child, on 
joining the society, receives a little tin bank, or box, which is kept at 
home, and into which the missionary pennies are put as fast as earned. 
On birthdays and other special occasions, additional amounts find their 
way into them. Occasionally a father, or big brother, who has been an 
honorary member," by vote of the society, contributes fifty cents or a dol- 
lar. In this way, and with the proceeds of an entertainment, the society 
has raised one hundred dollars and over, for missions every year. 

Last spring, according to a suggestion received from a story in the 
Advance, they decided to try the plan of increasing a penny. Each 
child was given a penny and told to see how large she could make it 
grow. It was hard to invest just one cent, and no more, but every one 
did so, and honestly too. Pop-corn seemed to be the first thought, and in 
several cases increased the pennies fifty-fold. One little girl bought slate 
pencils and sold them for two cents, another bought a needle, and hem. 
med a towel, for which she was paid. Others invested in chickens, pea- 
nuts, flower seeds, and molasses candy. One little chicken, named Penny, 
grew up in time for a Thanksgiving dinner, and the flower seeds fur- 
nished many bouquets to lovers of flowers, and Mission bands. At Christ- 
mas time, the forty-five cents thus given out had increased to twelve dollars 
and sixty-three cents. This sum was kept separate from the yearly col- 
lection, and used to buy a present for a lady missionary in whom they 
were specially interested. 

Once a year an entertainment is given, consisting of recitations, 
songs, etc., together with a sale of simple articles, made mostly by them- 
selves. Last year they had a Japanese evening and secured a fine collec- 
tion of Japanese articles for sale on commission. A programme was also 
prepared in two parts. The first part consisted of music and recitations, 
such as all children delight in, and the second part was given by ten lit 
tie girls dressed in Japanese costumes and trained to a little nonsense 
programme of son_;s and speeches supposed to be appropriate to the 
assumed characters of the "Japanese Sisters." This proved so pleasing 
that they were asked to repeat it a few weeks later in another church. 
Nearly all the members were dressed in Japenese costumes made of pretty 
but inexpensive material. The entertainment was in connection with a 
church sociable given by the Ladies' Society, making a very pleasant evening 
for a large company, beside being pecuniarily successful. But their 
motto is not "all work and no play," so each year the Willing Workers 
have one or two picnics and have all the fun they can, feeling glad all the 
time that they belong to a Mission Band. They now number forty-five 



256 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

and, although for picnics and entertainments each one is sure to report 
yet the average attendance at the Sabbath meetings is from twenty to 
thirty, and it is sincerely hoped that they will strengthen by their lore 
and prayers, by their intelligent interest and their money, the W. H. M. 
S. and W. B. M. I. of the future. 

About two years after the organization of this Mission Band, its loved 
leader passed into her mansion on high, leaving the delightful work to 
other hands. NbrthfieM, Minn. 



(&\\x ^'ftting people. 

' ' Do good to the heathen who live in Japan, 

Do good to the dwellers in wide Hindostan. 

Do good to the isles of the sea, if you can, 

Do good to the people on each foreign shore, 

But don't forget those so close to your door, 

Because they're in darkness in this land of light, 

Because with their sin they would overcome right, 

And bring on our Nation the blackness of night, 

So, for all the wide world, we'll work with our might. 



APPLE BLOSSOMS. 



"The King's Daughters" of Amherst, Mass., held an "Apple Blos- 
som Social," in June, at the house of Mrs. D. L. Marsh. The Secretary, 
Miss Fanley, says, "We trimmed the rooms with apple blossoms, and 
each one of us read or spoke something relating to apple blossoms, and 
the fruit. The programme was interspersed with singing by the 
Amherst College Quartette, who very kindly gave their services. Miss 
Chapin, of Springfield, also sang to us. After the entertainment we 
served refreshments to the people. We charged thirty cents apiece for 
the tickets, each one of us selling from nine to twelve. After deducting 
expenses we are able to send you $43 for the church at Willow Lake, 
Dakota. This is our first effort, but T am sure it will not be our last. 
Most of us'are in school and do not have much time to sew for missions, 
so we have to get up things that do not take very much time. Our ' ten ' 
of 'King's Daughters ' is the first in Amherst." 

Is there not a hint here for other busy school-girls ? 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 

The following correct answers to the questions are furnished by 
Mabel B. Stewart, Nina Lamkin, Edwin M. Allender, all of Champaign, 
Illinois ; The Lois Jewett Circle, Webster, New Hampshire ; The Help- 
ing Hand Society, Sudbury, Mass., and a ten-year-old boy who oalls him- 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 257 

self "Massachusetts." Two lists of well -written answers have come, 
without any name. If you do not wish to have your name published, 
you can say so, but the editor, who can keep a secret ! would like to know 
who you are. 

48. Why did certain eminent ministers of New England go to Bos- 
ton, Mass., Jan. 11, 1826 ? 

A. To talk with each other about Home Missions, and to get the 
United Domestic Missionary Society, of New York, to become the Ameri- 
can Domestic Missionary Society. 

49. In what city was The American Home Missionary Society formed? 
A. In New York. 

50. How many people came together to form it, and in what church 
did they meet ? 

A. 126 people. They met in the Brick Presbyterian Church, in 
New York City. 

51. By what churches is this Society supported ? 
A. The Congregational churches. 

52. Ought every Congregational Church in the country to help sup- 
port this Society ? 

A. Yes. 

53. Why? 

Because the future of the West depends upon it, and the future of 
our country depends upon the West. 

Because money is needed to put churches and Sunday-schools where 
there are none. 

Because it is our duty to our fellow-men. - 

54. Does your church help ? 
A. Yes. 

[And that must be the reason why its boys and girls are wide awake.] 

55. Define the word "auxiliary." 

56. W T hat is a State Auxiliary ? 

57. How many State Auxiliaries has this Society ? 

58. Name the States. 

59. Where do you find these names ? 

60. What must a State do, to become an auxiliary of The American 
Home Missionary Society ? 

61. What is the American Home Missionary Society trying to do ? 

62. How? 

63. How many Missionaries does this Society send out ? 

64. Does this Society have any schools ? 

65. How many, and in what States ? 



BANNER STATE THIS MONTH. 
Lsr Contributions : Massachusetts. 
Lv Answer to Questions : Illinois. 



258 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

A GOOD ANSWER. 

An answer from one of our boys, to question 34, came too late to be 
printed with the other answers, but it is too good to be lost, so we will 
have it now. 

The question is, Are you trying to help this Society, and why? 

Answer. " I have not begun to help it much yet, but I will do so 
this year, because Jesus said, ' Go preach my Gospel,' and about the only 
way you can do that, if you can't go yourself, and want to have a hand 
in spreading the Gospel, is to send money to those who do go, and then, 
you get represented." 






DOLLARS FOR SELF AND CENTS FOR CHRIST. 

" Yes, I always give for missions and everything else," said Phil. 
« I give something every Sunday; don't you?" 

" Why no; I give five or ten cents when I think I can spare it, when 
I have a good deal of money and don't want it for anything," said Tom. 

"I give whatever papa or mamma give me for it," said James. 
" Sometimes it's more and sometimes it's less." 

" Oh, I always give my own money!" said Phil. " I don't think it's 
any giving at all unless you do that." 

" Yours is the best way, I'm sure," said Tom, soberly. " They say 
it's the regular giving that counts." 

"And then, of course, what you give is just so much out of what 
you'd like to spend on yourself." 

"Yes," said Phil, feeling very self-denying and virtuous. 

"I'm going to try your way," said Tom. "And I'm going to keep 
an account and see what it will amount to." 

The three boys were on their way home from Sunday-school, where 
they had heard from a missionary some very interesting accounts of his 
work. He had treated his subject with all the power which comes of a 
heart glowing with zeal in the grand work to which he had devoted his 
life, and, as heart always awakens heart, he had succeeded in deeply stir- 
ring the sympathies of his young hearers as he told of lives wretched and 
degraded in this world and hopeless as regards any other. 

Many of them went away with the solemn feeling that they should in 
some sense be held answerable if they did not strive to hold out a helping 
hand to those in such sore need. For the present it was plain that mis- 
sionary interest was at its height, and little societies were formed among 
Sunday-school children, they believing it would be pleasanter to put 
their gifts together than to offer them separately. 

Several boys came to Phil's house on the next afternoon to talk it 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 259 

over, and Phil brought his account-book to put down their names as the 
first members of their society, with a preamble in which occurred many 
high-sounding words setting forth their resolves and intentions. 

''What's this, Phil?" asked his uncle, picking up the book on the 
same evening after tea. 

" Oh that's my account-book, uncle. I brought it down to take 
names and draw up resolutions for our missionary society." 

" May I read it, or is it a secret organization?" 

"Certainly, you may. I am simply, you know, trying to workup the 
idea of liberal giving among the boys." 

"A most excellent idea," said his uncle, concealing his amusement 
at Phil's rather pompous tone. Let me see — bananas, twenty-five cents; 
soda water, ten cents; peanuts, twenty-five cents; bat, thirty-five cents; 
candy, fifteen cents; base-ball cap, seventy-five cents; Sunday-school, six 
cents — " 

"Oh, stop, Uncle George; that isn't in it! That's when I was visit- 
ing at Cousin Tom's, aud I promised mamma I'd put down every cent I 
spent." 

But Uncle George seemed not to hear, and went on — 

" Peanuts, fifteen cents; bananas, twenty-five cents; getting shoe 
mended, forty cents; soda water, ten cents; missionaries, five cents; get- 
ting bat mended, fifteen cents; lemonade for the boys, fifty cents; 
banauas, twenty-five cents; collection in church, two cents." 

'■Please give me the book, uncle." 

"I am glad you don't forget your charitable duties, Phil," said his 
uncle, giving up the book with rather a mischievous smile. 

Phil took it in some confusion. He had heretofore thought but 
little more of his spendings than to remember his mother's wish that he 
should keep an account of the money with which she kept him so liber- 
ally supplied. Now, in looking over his hasty entries, he was astonished. 

" Well, well!" he exclaimed, as he added up one page; "two dollars 
and ninety cents for eating and play, and seventeen cents forgiving, and 
I bragging to the boys what a good thing it is to give regularly!" 

He was a conscientious boy, and his heart smote him as he ran over 
the long list, and thought, with his newly-awakeued feelings, of the Bread 
of Life which that money might have carried to starving souls. If his 
mother had aimed to teach him a lesson through his account-book, she 
had not failed. 

He got up at last and stood before the glass. 

" Now, my young man," he said, shaking his head very threaten- 
ingly at the boyish face he saw there, " you know very well that a quar- 
ter for peanuts doesn't look any larger to you than a pin's head, and 
that a quarter for giving looks as big as a cart-wheel — but that's got to 
stop, sir! This book isn't going to hold anymore accounts of dollars for 
trash and cents for Sunday-school." — Exchange. 



260 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 

appointments in Sttttj, 1888. 



Wot in commission last year. 

Baskerville, Mark, Aurora, Neb. 

Berry, George R., Arena and Logan, So. Dak. 

Blease, William H., West Pittston and Exeter, 

Penn. 
Campbell, J. G., Ree Heights and Greenleaf, So. 

Dak. 
Covell, Arthur J.. Fremont, Mich. 
Clark, Victor F., David City, Neb. 
Davy, Jamee J., Rose Valley, No. Dak. 
Edwards, John, Lansford, Penn. 
Hendrickson, John, Ironwood, Mich. 
Matthews, James T., Blossburg and Arnot, Penn. 
Neumann, Isaac, Guide Rock, Beaver and Willow 

Creek, Neb. 
Pascoe, William H., Rio Dell and Scotia, Cal. 
Sanborn, Daniel L., Baldwin, Mich. 
Trieber, Michael, Sutton, Neb. 
Vogle, Henry, Guadenfeld, Rosenfeld, St. John 

and St. Peter. So. Dak. 

Re-commissioned. 

Avery, Holly H., Wano, Kan. 

Bacon, Miles E., Gettysburg, Lebanon, Davidson 

and out-station, So. Dak. 
Badertecner, Gottfried, Warrenville, N. J. 
Bailey, Amos J., Ogden City, Utah. 
Battey, Richard H, Millbank, So. Dak. 
Beach, Edwin R., Saddle, Or. 
Belsey, George, Kane, Penn. 
Bickford, Warren F., Lorin, Cal. 
Bonney, John R., De Smet, So. Dak. 
Bowman, David £>., Eureka, Cal. 
Brown, Amasa A., Mitchell and Thomas school- 
house, So. Dak. 
Cadwalader, John. West Bangor. Penn. 
Camfield, Lewis E., Letcher and Firesteel, So. 

Dak. 
Combs, Clement, Billings, Ritchey and Nicholas 

Junction, Mo. 
Cooke, William H., Oakland, Cal. 
Cooper, Joseph II., Addison, Mich. 
Cressman, Edmund, Kilpatrick, Neb. 
Davis, Joseph W., Rapid City, Dak. 
Diggs, Marshall W., Fort Recovery, Ohio. 
Dodge, Milo W., Griffin's Mills, N. Y. 
Dyas, Joseph P., Henry and Elrod, So. Dak. 
Earl, James, Evangelist in Minn. 
Evans, John G., Nanticoke, Penn. 
Fisk, Pliny B., Cresbard and Myron, So. Dak. 
Fisk, Wilbur, Freeborn, Freedom, Manchester, 

Hartford, and McPherson, Minn. 
Gilchrist, Howard H., Little River and Galva, 

Kan. 
Griffith, Evan T., Fountain Springs, Penn, 
Griffith, William, Sykeston, Ontario, Oshkosh 

and vicinitv, No. Dak. 
Henderson, Thomas H., Albina, Or. 
Hodges, John G., Hersey, Mich. 
Holt,'Joseph W.,Rosedale, White Settlement and 

Hay Lake, Mich. 
Howells, Edmund D., Adin, Cal. 



Huntley, SanfordF., Templeton, Lynndale, Eden. 
Bethel and Waterbury, So. Dak. 

Johnston, Themas C, Honey Creek and Kahoka, 
Mo. 

Jones, John A., Alila, Cal. 

Kelsey, Francis D., Helena, Mon. 

Kyle, James H., Ipswich, So. Dak. 

Lawrence, Henry O., Brainerd, Minn. 

Lee, George H., Pendleton, Or. 

Libby, Edgar H.,Dustin, Sonneyview, Richmond 
and Pioneer, Neb. 

Lippard, James H., Smith Center, Kan. 

Liston, Robert T. , Nogales and Harshaw, Ariz. 

Lloyd, George, Gilmore, Mich. 

Lyman, Albert T, Alexandria, Emery and Bur- 
ton, So. Dak. 

McArthur, William W., Fertile and Mentor, Minn. 

McHenry, Fergus G., Bloomington, Kan. 

Mcintosh, David C, Breckenridge, Utica and 
Maple Grove, Mo. 

McNair, David C, Mine LaMotte, Mo. 

Millar, William II., Chesaning, Mich. 

Miller, John W., Sac Bay, Kates Bay, Rapid River 
and Masonville, Mich. 

Nelson, Andrew G., Sauk Rapids and Upsala, 
Minn. 

Norton, Reuben, Eden, Alcester and two out-sta- 
tions, So. Dak. 

Palmer, Asa B., Soquel, Cal. 

Powell, Gregory J., Chadron and Flag Butte, Neb. 

Pressy, Edwin S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Redeoff, Richard, Sherman, Cleon and Marilla, 
Mich. 

Robbing, Anson H, Lake Preston and North 
Preston, So. Dak. 

Sage, Charles J., Evangelist in Mo. 

Schaerer, John, Crete, Neb. 

Schnerle, Gottlieb, New Hope and Stockholm, 
Neb. 

Sherk, Abraham B., Riceville and Centreville, 
Penn. 

Slasor, Leroy V., Lenora, Wakeman, Glen Valley 
and Cheeseman, Kan. 

Smith, James M. , Hancock and Lake Emily, Minn. 

Snell, Charles Y., Dickinson and Gladstone, No. 
Dak. 

Snyder, Henry C, Fruitport and Nunica, Mich. 

Somerville, Jay W., Alba, Mich. 

Spring, John W, Lin wood and Lenape, Kan. 

Tobey, Isaac F., Rocklin, Cal. 

Travis, David Q., Meadville, Mo. 

Trueblood, Jasper, Mauckport, Central Beech- 
wood, Ind. 

Tuck, Mark W., Standish, Mich. 

Tuttle, Charles F., Clare and Dover, Mich. 

Wallace, Stryker A., Billings, Mon. 

Washburn, William S., Bon Homme and Lake- 
port, So. Dak. 

Weidmann, Peter, Spring Creek, Neb. 

Wheelock, Rufus A., Sherman, Tex. 

Wiberg, George, St. Louis, Mo. 

Wilson, John~J. , Clear Creek and Beulah, Kan. 

Wirt, David, Lexington and Arlington, Or. 

Woods, Abel S., Philadelphia, N.Y. 



Receipts in %n\% 1888. 



MAINE— $537. V5. 

. Received by J. L. Crosby,Treas. Maine 
Miss. Soc: 

Bangor, First, by W. P. 
Hubbard $28 00 



John W. Coffin $30 00 

Bath, Winter Street Ch., special 

Machias, Center St., by A. L. Heaton. 

Portland, Williston Ch. Benev. Fund, 

byG. F. Thurston 



$58 00 

350 00 

10 00 

36 00 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



261 



St. Lawrence St., by J. J.Gerrish... $10 00 

F. T. Bnyley 50 00 

Waldoboro, Mrs. C. J. Stover, $8.50; 

Mis. S. A. Trowbridge, $1: Mrs. W. 

Young, 25c 3 75 

Wells, B. Maxwell 20 00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $112.76. 

Dover, Mrs. A. A. Fairbanks $5 00 

Keene, Targuhie Soc, by E. W. Rich- 
ards, for Salary Fund 50 00 

Littleton, by A." J. church 13 75 

London, J. 8. Jones 25 00 

Portsmouth, A few ladies of North Ch. 

^lH'<•ial 8 00 

Wilton, Second Ch., by C. Wilson.... 11 00 

VERMONT— $157.70. 
Received by Mrs. W, P. Fairbanks, 
Treas. Woman's II. M. Union: 
St. Johnsbury, Ladies of 

South Ch. $25 00 

Mrs. W. P. Fairbanks 50 00 

Ladies of H. M. Soc. of 

North Oh.. 60 00 

135 00 

Brookfield, by Rev. R. D Metcalf.... 4 00 

New Haven, A Friend 2 00 

Randolph, A Friend, for Mo. Pelt 

Fund 5 00 

South Rovalton, Mrs. S. 11. Jones 10 00 

West I'awlet, by Rev.I. Jones 1 70 

MASSACHUSETTS— $11,800.33; of which Legacy, 
$3,000.00. 
Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas., (of which $500. from 
A. E. Hildreth annuity), of which 
for Bohemian Work, $5; Woman's 
Dep. $66.75; for Crete College, Neb., 

special, $10 $7,500 00 

Amherst, First, by W. Hamlin 75 00 

Mrs. E. J. Seelye 50 00 

A Friend 2 00 

Barre Plains, Mrs. W. W. Glazier ... 5 00 

Boston, W. H M. A., by Sarah K. Bur- 

gess,Tr , for Salary Fund.. 189 99 

Braintree, Miss S. ft. Thayer, special 10 00 

Cummington, Thank-offering from a 

Friend 10 00 

Curtisville, by Mrs. S. A. Hazen 33 81 

Dorchester, Mrs. Walter Baker, special 100 00 
Dwight, Union Soc, by G. R, Dickin- 
son 6 40 

Easthampton, Mrs. W. H. Wright 4 40 

Fall River. MissS. V. Bowen, special. 1 00 

Georgetown, Young Ladies' H. M. 
Soc, by Miss Alice A. Wildes, for 

Mo. Pelt Fund. 1 00 

Haydenville, by C. D. Waite 15 00 

Jamaica Plain, C. T. Bauer, Thank- 
offering 15 00 

Leominster, Int. on Woodbury Fund, 

by A. O. Wilder 120 00 

Mittineague, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 

Fund 15 00 

H. A. Goodman, for Crete College 

Fund 25 00 

New Bedford, Mrs. M. L. F. Bartlett 30 00 

New Braintree, by G. K. Tufts, 

special 36 00 

Newton Center, Rev. Dr. Furber, 

special 5 00 

Northampton, A. L. Williston 300 00 

Northboro, by C. A. Lawrence. 51 54 

Oxford, First", by W. E. Pease 8J 00 

Quincv, J. 11. Wheble 100 

Sheffield, by Mrs. M. E. Cowles. 11 80 

South Acton, S. M. D., towards nails 
for Mrs. Pickett's Rockv Mountain 

Ch., special 100 

South Deerfield, Birthday offerings 
for three persons, by C. A. Stowell. 2 28 

Wakefield, by G. R. Morrison 66 11 

Worcester, on account of legacy of 
David Whitcomb. bv Henry Whit- 
comb, Ex 3,000 00 



C. A. Lincoln's Class in S. S. of Ply- 
mouth Ch $25 00 

S. Pierce 10 00 

RHODE ISLAND -$141.57. 

Central Falls, A Friend 60 00 

Peace Dale, by J. A. Brown 56 57 

Providence, by H. C. Waters, for 

Salary Fund 25 00 

CONNECTICUT— $3,558.30; of which 
Legacies, $1,500.00. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn.,W. W. Jacobs, 

Treas., by Rev. W. H. Moore, Sec. $263 78 
Received by Mrs. S. M. Hotch- 

kiss, Sec. Woman's II. M. 

Union: 

Bridgeport, Aux. of the South 
Ch.,for Salary Fund.. $35 00 

< lhaplin, A Friend, for Salary 
Fund 2 00 

Hartford, S. S., First Ch 24 00 

New Haven, A Friend, by Mrs. 

G. L. Walker, special 25 00 

86 00 

Ashford, Mrs. C. S. Trowbridge 5 00 

Bethel, Ladies' Mite Boxes, by Miss 

H. H. Seelye 20 72 

Bridgeport, S. S. of Second Ch., to 

const. Mortimer S. Comstock a 

L. M 50 00 

Broad Brook, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. 

D. E. Jones, special 25 00 

Brooklyn, Mrs. A. B. Woodbridge, to 

const, herself a L. M 50 00 

Cheshire, S. E. Stoddard 5 00 

Columbia, by S. F. West 23 50 

Connecticut, A Friend 100 00 

Deep River, R. O, special. 1 00 

Ellington, to const. Rev. W. T. 
Hutchins, John Thompson, John T. 
McKnight, George Harrison and 

Mrs. Fanny Pinney L. Ms 278 32 

Enfield, Gleaners' Mission Circle, in 
full, to const. Mrs. Charity Haves a 

L. M., by Mrs. F. B. Gowdy 20 00 

Farmington, Ch. $81.95; Henry D. 
Hawley, to const. Miss Grace M. 
Holt a L. M., $100, by F. C. Jones . 181 95 

Guilford, A Friend 100 00 

Hartford, Legacy of Samuel T. Wol- 

cott, by Samuel E. Elmore, Ex 1,000 00 

First, A Friend, $5; A Friend, $1, 

for "Ground Hog Skin Fund" 6 00 

"Hail Columbia' 7 . 5 00 

Huntington, Legacy of Noah Baldwin, 

by W. S. Downs, Adm._ 500 00 

New Haven, First Ch., in full, by F, 

S. Bradley... 68 50 

New London, First, bv C. D. Boss, Jr 54 06 

Plainville, by H. S. Potter 100 10 

Salisbury, W. II. M. S., by Mrs. M. H. 
Williams, for work among for- 
eigners 37 00 

Scitico, J. W. Stowe, Bal. to const, a 

L. M 10 00 

Somers, by L. W. Percival 26 10 

South Britain, bv C. A. Bradley 19 31 

Southington, by L. B. Neal.. 79 20 

Stonington, Second, bv J. E. Smith .. 86 05 

Stafford Springs,bv F. H. Spelman 13 47 

Stratford, M. De, for Swedish Fund __ 5 00 

Terryville, E. Fenn - 3 00 

Walfingford, Pledge Fund, by G. M. 

Judd 66 90 

Waterbnry, Kate L. Maltby, add'l 5 00 

West Hartford, Friends in Conn., for 

Salary Fund 200 00 

Westport. $31.53; Saugatuck, $7, by 

H. C. Woodworth 28 53 

Windham, Alice W. Robbins 55 

Winthrop, Two Sisters, bv R. E. Rice 10 00 
Woodbury, North Ch., by L. E. 
Dawson 23 67 



262 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



September* 



NEW YORK— $2,121.30 ; of which Leg- | 

acy, $400.00. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Upton : 

Pulaski $14 50 

Volney 4 25 

$18 75 

Received by Mrs. L. H. Cobb, Treas. 
W. H. M. U. : 

Albany, Aux., special $11 00 

Crown Point, A Friend in 

Essex Co., general work. 25 00 
Special for Mrs. J. W. 

Pickett 5 00 

Fairport, Ladies' Aux. , 

special 5 67 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Howard 
to const. Mrs. Nancy 

Weare, a L. M. 50 00 

Smyrna, Yoang Peoples 1 

Soc 5 00 

101 67 

Albany, A Friend 50 00 

Aqnebogue, by C. F. Wells 12 00 

Brinckerhoffville, for Debt, A. L. H. . 15 00 

Brooklyn, Rochester Avenue Ch., by 
John Fraser, Tr., to const. John 
Ahrens and Oscar Frisbie L. Ms. 125 29 

Union Ch., by W. C. Greene 5 00 

Nazarene Ch., by Rev. A. J. Henry. 3 00 

Rev. E. P. Thwing D. D., $10; Mrs. 

S. H. Brown, $4.40 14 40 

Candor, by Rev. J. P. Richardson 19 00 

E. A. Booth 100 00 

Chatham, A Friend 10 00 

Churchville, by A. D. Stone 61 32 

East Rockaway, by Rev. Ch. Bente... 22 00 
Flushing, Young: Peoples 1 Soc. and 
S. S., by J. W. Treadwell, for Boh. 

Bible Reader's Home 25 00 

Hemlock Lake, A Friend _ 2 00 

Hollis, A Friend, special 15 00 

Hopkinton, by J. Brush 86 00 

Ithaca, First, by S. D. Sawyer 82 00 

Keuka, Mrs. E. Wilson 5 00 

New Village and Farmingville, by 

Rev. F. A. Valentine 4 00 

New York City, Mrs. Parker, $100 ; S. 
T. Gordon, $100 ; O. W. Coe, $50 ; 
Alice Clifton and Florence Youel 
Pond, their gift after death, $1.57; 
W. Abbatt, $1 ; Miss J. A. Van 

Allen, $1 253 57 

Ninevah, A Friend 500 00 

North Java, by Rev. J. H. Mallows .. 3 61 

Norwich, by J. Hammond 39 60 

Orient, Miss'y Circle, in part, to 
const., G. W. Hallock a L. M., by 

G. W. Hallock 25 00 

Owego, by J. M. Hastings 11 00 

Paris, by Rev. W. E. Mather 37 50 

Perry Center, Miss Cornelia Butler ... 10 00 

Remsen, by Rev. J. F. Humphrey 4 00 

Sidney, by J. E. Sherman 15 52 

Springville, S. P. J., "To help move 
along the pink line on the Map 

Cards" 1 5 00 

Street Road, The Widow's Mite 1 00 

Suspension Bridge, by John Brown .. 10 23 
Syracuse, Legacy of Ira H. Cobb, by 

Nathan Cobb, Ex 400 00 

West Brook, by W. L. McClenon "» 4 50 

West Carthage, by Rev. G. B. Rowley. 13 08 
Westmoreland, by J. Bell 11 35 

NEW JERSEY— $64.06. 
Chester, Ladies 1 Assoc, by Rev. F. A. 

Johnson, for Salary Fund 42 00 

Jersey City, by Rev. N. M. Sherwood. 9 30 

Plainfield, Mrs. M. E. Whiton 10 00 

Warrenville, by Rev. G. Badertscher. 2 76 

PENNSYLVANIA— $71 . 20. 
Alden, by Rev. D. I. Jones 2 00 

Bangor, by Rev. J. Williams . 7 50 

Corry, Ladies of Cong. Ch., by Mrs. 
H. King and Rev. J. G. Fraser 5 00 



East Smithfield, by A. O. Tracy $15 00 

Eben6burgh, by C. T.Roberts. 7 15 

Mt. Carmel, by Rev. D. D. Davies .... 8 05 

Nanticoke, by Rev. J. G. Evans 5 00 

Roxboro, A Friend 14 00 

Sharpsburg, by Rev. W. McCraken... 5 00 

West Bangor, by Rev. J. Cadwalader 2 50 

MARYLAND— $500.00. 

Maryland, A Friend 500 00 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $75.00. 
Washington, Ladies 1 II. M. Soc. of 
Cong. Ch., by Miss Lizzie Patterson, 

for Salary Fund 25 00 

Mrs. N. A. Thacher to const. Sarah 
A. Thacher a L. M 50 00 

ARKANSAS— $1.10. 

Siloam Springs, by Rev. V. E. Loba . 1 10 

FLORIDA— $16.85. 

Woman's H. M. Union, by Rev. S. V. 
McDuffee $3 10 

Day tona, Mrs. G. II. Clark 5 00 

Longwood, $3.75 ; West Longwood, 
$5 ; by Rev. L. C. Partridge 8 75 

INDIAN TERRITORY— $11.58. 

McAllister, by Rev. J. H. Van Dyne.. 4 58 

Doaksville, by Rev. A. Gross 3 00 

Hopkins, by Rev. H. H. Hines 4 00 

ARIZONA— $28.19. 
Nogales, by Rev. R. T. Liston 28 19 

OHIO— $l,702.a5; of which Legacy, $714.20. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser: 
Cleveland, Euclid Avenue, 

by T. M. Bates $60 57 

Franklin Avenue, by Rev. 
S. B. Shipman, D.D.... 20 90 " 
Hartford, Ch., by Mrs. Alice 

Dnrfey 5 00 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Met- 

calf 10 00 

96 47 

Received in June by S. P. Churchill, 
Treas. Bohemian Board, Cleveland: 

Cleveland, First $23 25 

Euclid Avenue 69 00 

Elyria, First 10 00 

Unionville, S. S 5 65 

Wellington, S. S 20 00 

127 90 
By Mrs. Phebe A. Crafts, Treas. O. 
W. H. M. Union: 

Bellevue,L. M. S $3 66 

Brooklyn Village 13 15 

Columbus, Eastwood L. M. 
S 10 00 

26 81 154 71 
Received by Rev. R. Quaife, Churches 

and Individuals 156 62 

Bellevue, S. W. Boise 300 00 

Castalia, by Rev. J. C. Prentice 5 78 

Cleveland, Remainder of Legacy of 

Elisha Taylor, by J. W. Taylor, Ex. 714 20 

By Rev. J. H. Hull 5 00 

By Rev. E. E. Scoville 5 04 

East Liverpool, Rev. H. D. Kitchel, 

D.D. 50 00 

Hampden, by Rev. II. A. N. Richards 10 00 
Medina, Y. P. S. C. E. of First Ch., 

$17.69; A Friend, $5; by W. H. 

Sipher 22 69 

Oberlin, First, by H. G. Husted 73 93 

Miss O. Hertz for Swedish Fund 10 00 

Painesville, Mrs. A. N. Andrus 30 00 

Windham, by A. S. Higby 18 41 

Miss E. A. Alford, to const, herself 

aL. M 50 00 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



263 



INDIANA— $18.84. 

Coal Bluff, by Rev. J. Hayes $6 84 

Mauckport, by Eev. J. Trueblood 12 00 

ILLINOIS— $1,082.70; of which Legacy, 
$1,000.00. 
Received by Mrs. C. E. Maltby, Treae. 

111. W. 11. M. U __ 12 70 

Chicago, On account of Legacy of 
PhiK) Carpenter, by Rev. J. Tomp- 
kins, D.D.. - 1,000 00 

®n account of Estate of Phllo Car 
penter, bv Rev. .1. E. Roy, D.D... 57 00 

Delavan, R. Houghton 10 00 

Ridge Prairie, Rev. A. Kern 3 00 

MISSOURI— $45.18. 
Received by Mrs. A. E. Cook, Treae. 
W. II. M. Soc: 

Laclede, Mrs. E. D. Seward... $5 00 
Pierce City, L. II. M. S. of 
First Ch". 15 00 

20 00 

Billings, Everton and Ritchey, by 

Rev C. Combs 3 00 

Kidder and Sharon, by Rev. J. M. 

Bowers 8 00 

La Grange, by Rev. J. Reuth 5 00 

St. Louis, by Rev. E. F. Swab 6 68 

By Rev. G. Wiberg 2 50 

MICHIGAN— $1,003.82. 
Received by Rev. L. Warren: 

Almira.. 2 70 

Canandaigua 13 00 

Detroit, Trumbull Ave. Ch... 35 8G 

Manistee 18 15 

Morenci 27 25 

Tawas City 2 07 

The " Wide Awakes " Miss'y 

Soc 100 00 

Wheatland, Ch. 18c; S. S. 
$9.82; A Member of Church, 
$5 15 00 

214 03 

Received by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treae. 

Woman's H. M. Union: 

Almont $8 00 

Bridgeport, for Salary Fund.. 4 52 

Churchs 1 Corners 5 50 

Detroit, Ladies 1 Union 50 00 

Greenville 15 15 

Lansing 30 20 

Portland 8 00 

Ransom 5 00 

Webster, A Friend 5 00 

$131 37 
North Star Mission: 
Bridgeport, S. S. for Salary 

Fund 7 10 

Carson City, S. S., add'l 1 00 

Hopkins Station, S. S 2 30 

Hubbardston, Y. P. S. C. E... 100 

Imlay CitT, John Stapleton. .. 50 

Mecosta, S. S 2 50 

Muskegon, S. S 21 20 

Olivet, S. S., add'l 76 

Tipton, S. S. 4 41 

Traverse City, S. S 15 00 

$55 77 187 14 
Received by Rev. C. F. Van Au- 
ken: 

Alpena $123 25 

Dover 15 79 

Harrison. 23 41 

St. Louis 7 85 

Tipton 20 07 

190 37 

Detroit, Washvasel Avenue, by C. A. 

Burr 38 83 

East Saginaw, by E. W. Glynn 12 65 

Freeport, by Rev. R. Vivian 7 20 

Kalamo, by Rev. E. Ewell . 17 20 

Laingsburg, by J. V. D. Wyckoff. 7 18 

Maple Rapids and East Fulton, by 

Rev. W. II. Shannon 5 00 



Manistee, by Rev. C. G. Lundquist... 

Mecosta, by Rev. J. A. Curham 

Michigan, Friends, by Rev. W. G. 

l'uddefoot 

Michigan, " A Memorial " 

Nashville, by Kev. R llurd 

Olivet, by (J. W. Keyes 

Reed City, A Friend 

Sugar Island, by Rev. .J. Met .regor... 

Watervliet, by Rev. W. B. Dada 

WISCONSIN— $136.45. 

Received by Mrs. ('. ('. Keeler, Trcas. 
Woman's II. M. Union: 
For Bohemian Work: 

Beloit, First, Ch. $34 55 

Grand Rapids, S S. Birthday 
Box 2 00 

Ashland, by Rev. W. T. Sutherland.. 

Beloit, by Rev. Jer. Porter. 

Clear Lake, by Rev. M. Peterson 

La Crosse, First, by S. S. Burton 

Washburn, by Rev. G. A. Hood 

IOWA— $52.70. 

Brittand Wesley, by Rev. L. C. 
Johnson. 

Garnavillo, Rev. G. M. Porter 

Grinnell, Rev. F. W. Walcott, special. 

Jefferson, Rev. D. B. Eells 

McGregor, Young People's Mission 
Band, by Mrs. J. H. Ellsworth, 
special, for Rev. A. J. Drake's 

church 

MINNESOTA— $708.35. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley: 
Alexandria, S. S., by G. L- 

Treat .$ 5 00 

Duluth, Pilgrim, by T. H. 

Hawkes 112 00 

Excelsior, Ch, by Mrs. Young. 21 20 

Faribault, by H. Wilson 29 26 

Lake City, by E. J, Manning. 12 37 
Minneapolis, Plymouth, by II. 

B.Hudson.. 61 75 

Monticello, by I. C. Tarbox_„ 5 00 
St. Paul, Park Ch. by E. F. 

Lambert 69 01 

Zumbrota, S. S. by E. J. Rice. 7 58 

323 17 
By Mrs. J. N. Cross, Treas. 
Woman's H. M. Soc: 

Benson 3 50 

Fergus Falls, for Salary Fund 6 40 

Glyndon, Aux 6 50 

Lake Stay, Aux 3 25 

Minneapolis, Plymouth W. H. 

M. S 44 00 

Open Door, for Salary Fund 5 00 

Pilgrim Gleaners. 10 00 

Mrs. Henry Plant 5 00 

A Friend 10 00 

New Ulm, Aux. of which 
$2.60 for Bohemian Work. . . 8 00 

St. Cloud 21 00 

St. Paul, Plymouth, W. H. M. S., 
of which $3 for Salary Fund, 64 00 
Plymouth, S. S., $50; Y. L. M. 

S..P1.56 81 56 

Park, for Salary Fund 5 00 

Stillwater 4 70 

Winona 15 50 



$3 00 
5 15 

75 00 
200 00 

9 00 
56 72 
10 00 

3 00 
22 35 



36 55 
16 00 
50 00 
1 50 
19 08 
13 32 



5 20 

5 00 

20 00 

10 00 



12 50 



293 41 616 58 

Appleton, by Rev. J. T. Marvin 3 35 

Forest Mills and Lake Citv, by Rev. J. 

P.Rood 1 00 

Hawley, bv Rev. O. M. Smith 5 00 

Mantorvill'e, by Rev. E. E. Webber... 19 00 
Pelican Rapids, by Rev. J. C. Hunt- 
ington 18 00 

Rushford, by Rev. O. P. Champlin.... 5 50 

St. Cloud, First, by W. S. Clark 10 00 

St. Charles, by Mrs. L. W. Howe 12 48 

Stillwater, by Rev. J. H. Albert 17 44 



264 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



September, 



KANSAS— $147.80. 
Received by Rev. J. G. Dougherty, 
Treas. Kan. II. M. Soc.: 

Woman's II. M. Soc $15 25 

Manhattan, Mrs. Mary Par- 
ker 60 00 

Sterling, A Friend 5 00 

$52 80 

Altoona and Village Creek, by Rev. 

T. V. Davies 3 00 

Ash Rock, New Harmony and Mt. 

Ayr, by Rev. R. S. Osbom 9 00 

flay Center, by Rev. L. C. Schnacke.. 6 50 

i ouncil Grove, by Rev. L. Armsby 1 50 

Garden City, by Rev. S. Wood 7 50 

Gritzland and Rotate, by Rev. D. H. 

Minich 3 00 

Lenora and Wakeman, by Rev. L. V. 

Slasor 1 50 

Longton and Elk Falls, by Rev. G. 

Marsh 3 00 

Mt. Hope and Haven, by Rev. E. J. 

Collins 1 50 

Osborne, by Rev. E. Skinner... 10 00 

Stockton, by Rev. F. E. Sherman 4 55 

Udall, by Rev. W. D. Trover 12 50 

Wakefield, by Rev. R. Kerr 3 00 

Wichita, by Rev. F. Foster 1 00 

Correction. Chapman, Detroit, ami 
Enterprise, by Rev. J. F. Smith. 
[Erroneously acknowledged in 
July.] 
NEBRASKA— $190.35. 
Received bv the Rev. J. L. Maile: 

Neel, by E. Staryer $3 10 

Ry Mrs. D. B. Perry, Treas. 
Woman's H. M. Union: 

Franklin 12 25 

Genoa..!. 9 00 

Lincoln, First 1 00 

North Hastings 1 00 

Ogalalla.. 1 00 

Omaha, First ... 35 00 

62 G5 

Received by Rev. G. E. Taylor, 

Churches and Individuals 20 05 

Ainsworth, by Rev. T.W. De Long... 15 00 

Chadron and Flag Butte, by Rev. G. J. 

Powell - 6 01 

Crete, by Rev. J. Schaerer 1 75 

Culbertson, Osborne and Hayes Co., 

by Rev. J. Arnold 2 00 

Glenrock, by Rev. II. Bross 3 05 

Hastings, by Rev. P. J. Falk 3 00 

Long Pine, by Rev. S. I. Hanford 1 00 

Newcastle, by Rev. W. J. Paske 15 25 

Reno, by Rev. T. Magill 17 00 

Wahoo, by Rev. A. A. Cressman 25 00 

York, Ladies' Miss. Soc, by Mrs. W. 

K. Williams 18 00 

NORTH DAKOTA— $10.50. 
Carrington, by Rev. C. T. Whittlesey. 1 00 

Cooperstown, by Rov. H. P. James... 2 50 

Mayville, by Rev. W. M. Ellis 5 00 

Sykeston, by Rev. W. Griffith 2 00 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $156.45. 
Received by Mrs. S. Fifield, Treas. 
Woman's H. M. Union: 

De Smet .$3 20 

Plankinton 5 75 

Mrs. Black's S. S. Class 1 50 

Yankton 6 25 

16 70 

Lake Henry and Hartland, by Rev. F. 

G. Appleton 5 65 

Huron, by Mrs. B. M. Rowley, Asst. 

Treas 112 10 

Iroquois, Mrs. A. J. Drake 1 00 

La Grange, by Rev. D. B. Nichols.... 3 00 

Lead City, by Rev. A. H. Bears.. 5 00 

Redfleld, by Rev. A. Wurrschmidt... 10 00 

Springfield, by Rev. C. Seccombe 3 00 

COLORADO— $70.60. 
Colorado Springs, Woman's Miss. 

Soc. of Cong. Ch., by Harriet P. 

Campbell 25 00 

Denver, by Rev. W. H. Brodhead 40 00 



Harmon, by Rev. W. L. Oilman 

WYOMING— $5.00. 
Big Horn, Sheridan and Becton 

MONTANA— $2.00. 
Butte City, by Rev. J. B. Clark 

CALIFORNIA— $73. 40. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Warren: 
Oakland, Market Street Ch... $6 00 
Oroville 10 23 

Eagle Rock and Edgemont, by Rev. 

E. Cash 

Fairview and Pescadero, by Rev. D. 

F. Taylor 

Green Valley, by Rev. R. Taylor 

Halleck, by Rev. E. B. Howell 

Hydesville and Rohnerville, by Rev. 

J. Macdonald 

Los Angeles, A. M. Duncan 

Modesto, by Rev. G. Mechtersheimer. 

Monrovia, bv Rev. D. H. Colcord 

Raymond, by Rev. T. T. Frickstadt.. 

Rocklin, by Rev. J. F. Tobey 

San Jacinto, by Rev. S. W. Delzell... 
Sierra Valley, by Rev. C. E. Philbrook 

OREGON— $81.10. 

Received by Rev. James Steele, Treas. 
Or. and Wash. Ter. 11. M. Soc: 

Albany $5 75 

Corvallis 12 75 



$5 60 
5 00 
2 00 

16 23 
2 50 



4 75 


5 00 


2 37 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


6 00 


1 75 


5 00 


8 30 


1 50 



18 50 
Bt Mrs. G. A. Rockwood, 
Treas. W. H. M. Soc. Or. 
and W. T.: 

Hood River $15 15 

Walla Walla, Aux 100 

16 15 34 65 
Beaver Creek, by Rev. G. H. Atkinson, 

D.D 1 50 

Hood River, by Rev. F. Balch 10 00 

Oregon Citv, Mrs. E. Stevens 5 00 

Portland, First Ch., Helping Hand 
Soc, $21.10 ; Albina, $3.85, by Rev. 

T. H. Henderson 24 95 

By Rev. E. Haskell 5 00 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— po.10. 

Anacortes, by Rev. H. J. Taylor 4 25 

Cheney, by Rev. A. H. Howells 3 20 

Farmington and Endicott, by Rev. F. 

V. Hoyt 1 00 

John River and Wynooche, bv Rev. 

O. A. Thomas 2 50 

Ritzville, by Rev. E. J. Singer 4 15 

Spokane Falls, Joyful Workers, by 

Agnes Cowley. 5 00 

Whatcom, by Rev. J. Wolfe 10 00 

SANDWICH ISLANDS— $400.00. 

Kohala, Rev. Elias Bond 400 00 

Home Missionary 130 30 



$25,306.26 



Donations of Clothing, Etc. 

Bristol, Ct, Ladies' 11. M. Soc, through 
the Woman's Congl. II. M. Union 
of Conn., by Mrs. N. L. Brewster, 
barrel and freight $140 30 

Centerbrook, Ct., Young Ladies' H. M. 
Soc, by Mrs. Chas. Kelsey, box, 
freightand cash. ...". 70 00 

Homer, N. Y., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc, 

by Ellen F. Phillips, barrel 42 07 

Lakeville, Ct.,box 1:35 00 

San Francisco, Cal., First Ch., by Mrs. 
J. 11. Warren, three boxes, package 
and cash 317 10 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



265 



NEW HAMPSHIRE HOME MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY. 
Meceinlsof the New Hampshire Home Missionary 

Society, from June f, 1888, to July SI, 1888, 

L. D. Stevens, Treas. 

Acworth, Cong. Church and Soc $8 91 

Andover, Center 5 00 

Andover, East 15 00 

Barnstead Parade 19 00 

Bethlehem, Mrs. Winch.. 5 00 

Chester, Church and Soc SO 00 

Chichester, Legacy of Augustus Leavitt 950 00 
Cornish, Interest on Legacy of Miss 

Westgate 24 21 

Concord, First, for A. II. M. S. $8 24 49 

Gilsum, for A. II. M. S 15 00 

Greenland 33 00 

Goffstown 53 00 

Great Falls 32 00 

Hampstead 12 00 

Hampton 14 00 

Hudson 4 00 

Keene, First 40 00 

Lisbon, Church and Soc 9 46 

Loudon 3 72 

Manchester, Hanover Street 59 80 

Nashua.. 39 22 

Newington 4 41 

Plymouth 11 47 

Rindge (A Friend, a Thank-offering, $3) 15 CO 

Rockingham County Conference 15 76 

Salisbury 3 00 

Salmon Falls 10 17 

Wilmot 7 00 

Walpole 31 37 

West Concord, for A. H. M. S. $15 25 00 

Wakefield.....' 12 00 

New Hampshire Cent Society 505 03 

$2,024 02 

♦ 

MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY. 

Eeceiptsofthe Massachusetts Home Missionary 

Society, in July, Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treas. 

Alford,by Rev. Aug. Alvord $13 00 

Andover, Free Christian, by Mrs. M. C. 

Cole... 129 14 

Bank Balance, Interest on 70 'JO 

Bernardston, and S. S., by Henry Slate, 37 00 
Boston, A Friend, to const. A. L. Ken- 
nedy, M. D., a L. M. of A. H. M. S ... 50 00 
A Thank-offering, Mrs. S. D. H 5 00 

B. & L, special 5 00 

C. A. S 50 00 

Special for German students in 

Crete College, Neb 50 00 

Daniels, Mrs. A. F., to const, self a 

L. M. of A. H. M. S. 50 00 

Dorchester, E. M. ... . 10 00 

Harvard, by E. F. Gleason.. G 00 

Second, bv Miss E. Tolman (of wh. 

$40 for A. H. M. S.)._ ._ 119 68 

S. S., by Miss E. L. Tolman 58 

\ Village, Ladies 1 Home Miss. Soc, 
> by 'Miss J. K. Wright, to const. 
Mrs. Wm, Tucker and Miss Har- 
riet D. Hutchinson, L. Ms 60 00 

Village, S. S., by Asa C. Hawes, for 

Western Work 59 08 

Eayrs, Mrs. Emily P 100 00 

Friends, to redeem Saratoga pledge 
for Crete College, Neb., by A. Mc- 
Lean 61 00 

^Greelev, Rev. F. N., for Iroquois, Dak. 5 00 

Memento Sales 3 00 

Roxbury, Highlands, "Our Country 
Assn./' by John Hale, special for 

French Prot. College . 9 50 

Immanuel, by Francis J. Ward 95 59 

South, Phillip's, by Miss Lucinda 

Smith, for Rev. C. M. Daley, Dak.. 25 00 
"To redeem this land for Christ, 1 ' for 

A. H. M. S. .. 50 00 

Union, by Albert Gav, (of wh. $50 for 

Slavic work) 274 75 



Mrs. C. P. Adams $100 00 

Brimfleld, First, by M. H. Corbin 6 80 

Brooklinc, Harvard, by II. B. Eager 74 13 

Buckland, by Chas. Howes 39 86 

Cambridge, A. E. Hildreth, Annuity, by 
A.E. II. Sons 500 00 

Charlomout, East, by J. T. Packard ... 7 50 

Chelsea, First, by II. W T . Jeffers 36 00 

Chicago, 111., Partial returns from suit 

at law 150 85 

Dana, by Rev. J. G. Willis 2 22 

Danvers, Maple St., by Eben Peabody 158 79 

Maple St., S. S., by Eben Peabody... 23 58 

Dedham, First, by Calvin Guild ($9.79 

Mon. Con. Coll.) 177 20 

B. Paul 5 00 

Falmouth, First, by Rev. H. K. Craig, 

Mon. Con. Coll... 14 25 

Gloucester, Evan., by Jos. O. Proctor .. 50 00 
Hampden Benev. Association, by Chae. 
Marsh, Treas: 

Granville, East $27 00 

Huntington, Second 21 11 

Longmeadow, East 3 50 

Monson 59 02 

Springfield, First 190 00 

IndianOrchard 10 00 

Memorial.. 101 28 

North.. 77 00 

Olivet... 85 00 

South 184 20 

Westfield, First, (of wh. $38.01 

for Shutesbury repairs) 60 29 

Second 24 35 

West Springfield, Mittineague 16 75 

Park St . 89 03 

Wilbraham 21 01 

_ 969 54 

Hardwick, Calvinistic, by Rev. C. M. 

Pierce 3 00 

Harvard, Rev. C. C. Torrey 10 00. 

Haverhill, Center, by Ezra Kelly 100 00 

Hingham, Evan., by J. O. Sanborn 18 18 

Hinsdale, by C. J. Kittredge.. 10 83 

Hopkinton, First, by F. O. Thompson, 

forA.H.M. S . 95 00 

Hyde Park, First, A Friend, by J. Ellery 

Piper 25 00 

I. C. P., special donation 5 00 

M. E. T, by J. Ellery Piper 30 00 

Jessup Fund, Income of 150 00 

Leominster, North, Est. of Leonard Bur- 
rage, by M. D. Hawes, Exec 512 42 

Lexington, Hancock, by W. W. Baker.. 26 52 

Lunenburg, Evan, by E. S. Francis 16 88 

Maiden, First, by Herbert Porter 59 90 

Medway, Village, bv Rev. R. K. Harlow CO 00 
Melrose, Orth., by Mrs. C. E. Cox, for 

Rev. Geo. Baker, Ferndale, W. T.._ 50 00 

Middleboro, First, by Chas. F. Cornish .*> 96 

Millbury, Rev. Geo. A. Putnam 5 00 

Nahant, Est. of Geo. Curtis, by L. C. 

Waterman, Trustee .. 3,000 00 

Natick, S. S., Prim. Dept., by Mies E.M. 

Peloubet 5 00 

New Braintree, by Geo. K. Tufts 12 00 

Newbury, First, by Edward Perkins.. 32 46 

Newton, Eliot, by D. E. Snow. .. 175 00 

First, byF. H. Scudder 182 74 

Warren, Mrs. A. C, byS. E. Warren, 
for Rev. H. A. Schauffler's Boh. 

Work.. 5 00 

Norfolk, byN. H. Rockwood 3 00 

Northampton, Edwards, by S. D. Drury 215 07 
North Andover, by Jos. S. Sanborn, to 
const. Mrs. S. E. Cowdrey and Mrs. 
A. F. Johnson L. Ms. .. 85 00 

Norton, Trin., by D. B. Winter 8 65 

Otis, Rev S..W. Powell, redemption of 
Saratoga pledge forCrete College... 10 00 
Special for Bohemian Bible House. 10 00 

Peabody, South, by Benj. N. Moore 110 00 

Randolph, First Evan., by Rev. J. C. 

Labaree .. 245 00 

Rockland, by W. A. Clark 75 00 

Salem, Tabernacle, by Jos. H. Phippen, 
to const, seven L. Ms of A. H. M. S. 564 12 



266 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



September 



Sharon, by Rev. Geo. F. Stanton, to 

const. Sanford W. Billings a L. M... 

S. S., by Rev. Geo. Stanton 

Southboro, Pilgrim, by Miss Lucy New- 
ton 

South Hadley, First, by L. M. Gaylord. 

Spencer, by J. L. Bush _ _ 

Sjockbridge,West, Center, by Rev. Aug. 
Alvord 

Stoughton, First, by D. C. Rose 

Mrs. E. B. S 

Taunton, Union, by Rev. £. N. Pomeroy 

Waltham, Trin., by T. W. Temple 

Ware, First, by W. L. Brackenridge 

Waverley, Mrs. Jane D Butler 

Webster, Mrs. Juliette Keith, by G. F._ 
Keith 

Wellesley, Rev. D. P. Cowan. 

Wendell, " Widow's Mite," by R. M. 
Taft 

Westhampton, by A. D. Montague. 

A Friend, "In His Name," tor Wom- 
an's Dept 

Whitin Fund, Income of 

Williamstown, First, byChas. S. Cowles 
South, by Rev. L. Whiting, D.D., for 
J. C. Torrey 

Winchendon, " T. T. T. Club " of boys 
in Mrs. C. C. Parker's S. S. Class, 
special for Rev. W. G. Puddefoot 

Woburn, First, Ladies' Char. Reading 
Soc, by Mrs. Maria R. Bickford, to 
const. Mrs. A. W. Dimmick a L. M... 

Worcester, Piedmont, by C. F. Marble 
Plymouth, by Jonas White (of wh. 

$61.75 for Woman's Dept.) 

Est. of David Whitcomb, by G. Henry 

! Whitcomb,lst installment of $25,000 
bequest 

Wrentham , by_S. M. Gerould 



$33 65 
10 00 

36 90 
33 50 
150 00 

2 00 
16 00 

2 00 
15 89 
103 32 

19 50 

20 00 

50 00 
25 00 

50 
36 00 

5 00 
120 00 

21 57 

...16 25 



36 00 
35 00 



316 81 



5,000 00 
17 50 



Home Missionary. 



$15,689 09 
4 80 



$15,693 89 



Donations of clothing, etc., received and reported 
at the rooms of the Mass. Home Miss. Society 
in July. 

Ware, S. S. Class, by Miss M. A. Bar- 
low, box 

Westfield, Second, Ladies' Benev. Soc, 
by Mrs. Henry Hooker, packages and 
freight 



$10 00 



43 70 



$83 70 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTI- 
CUT. 

Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut 

in July, Ward W. Jacobs, Treas. 

Ashford, First, by A. H. Byles $8 00 

VVestford, by Dea. C. W. Brett. 11 25 

Avon, West Avon, by M. F. Thompson. 13 00 

Bolton, by Rev. L. H. Barber 15 00 

Bridgeport, First, by Enoch P. Hincks. 179 35 

Olivet, by Chas. A. Hawkin6 12 40 

Canton, Center, by Wm. G. Hallock, 

$10 of which for A. H. M. S. Western 

Work 26 00 

Chatham, East Hampton, by Rev. E. P. 

Root 41 00 

Columbia, by Samuel F. West 24 00 

Cornwall, by Silas C. Beers 37 50 

Eastf ord, by J. D. Barrows _ 19 69 

East Granby, by James R. Viets 3 00 

East Lyme, Niantic, by Rev. C. W. 

Hanna 12 41 

Essex, by Charles S. Munger 23 71 

Farmington, by F. C. Jones $191 47 

Isaac E. Smith, by Rev. E. A. 

Smith . . 300 00 

491 47 

Hartford, First, by C. T. Welles 784 81 

Talcott Street, by A. J. Plato 5 32 

Wethersfleld Ave., by R. S. Burt $30.88 

S. S. $15.40 46 28 



Hartland, West Hartland, by Dea. II. L. 
Wilcox $5 00 

Kent, by John Hopson 27 46- 

Killingly,Danielsonville, by Chas. 

Phillips $20 63 

For A. H. M. S 93 21 

113 84 

South Killingly, by Rev. W. H. Beard.. 8 00 

Litchfield, First, Geo. M. Woodruff, 
personal 20 00 

New Canaan, by H. B. Rogers 56 00 

New Haven, First, by F. S. Bradley, 

supplementary 68 50 

Howard Ave., by Rev. W J. Mutch.. 33 87 

New London, First, by C. D. Boss, Jr.. 6J 48 
Second, Trust Estate of Henry P. Ha- 
ven, by Henry R. Bond, trustee 50 00 

Norwalk, First, by E. C. Bissell 50 00 

Norwich, First, by Lewis A. Hyde, $50 
of which is to const. Mrs. J. S. La- 
throp, of Norwich Town, Ct., a L. M., 
and $25 of which is from Lewis A. 
Hyde, with $25 contributed July, 1887, 
to const. Mrs. A. L. Hale, of Norwich 
Town, Ct., a L. M 125 00 

Old Lyme, by Roger Griswold 20 75 

Oxford, Rev. H. M. Hazeltine and fam- 
ily 9 00 

Plymouth, by Arthur Beardsley 22 00 

Terryville, R. D. H. Allen, personal.. 10 00 

Portland, First, by Rev. Henry M. Bow- 
den _ 55 25 

Putnam, Second, by H. N. Fenn, one- 
half of which for A. H. M. S. 25 98 

Redding, Georgetown, Rev. S. J. M. 
Merwin, personal 50 00 

Rockville, First, by E. C. Chapman, 
$13.35 and $292.58, of which $50 to 
const. Miss Jenny G. Loomis, of Rock- 
ville, a L. M., and $200 of which is 
from Dea. J. N. Stickney to const. Mr. 
and Mrs. David J. Carson, of Pelham 
Manor, N. Y., and Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
H. Stickney, of Longmont, Col. L. Ms. 305 93 

Seymour, Rev. T. E. Davies, personal.. 3 00 

Sharon, Ellsworth, by Rev. J. II. Muller 8 65 

Southington, by L. B. Neal 12 96. 

South Windsor, by Miss M. Janette El- 
mer 10 00 

Suffield, West Suffield, Church and So- 
ciety, by Benj. Sheldon _. 15 90 

Tolland, by E. C. Chapman 41 09 

Torrington, Third, A Friend, by Rev. 
L. Perrin 10 00 

Vernon, Rockville, Second, George Max- 
well, personal. 25 00 

Watertown, by James L. Loveland, 
$13.65, and $6.35, to const. Lucius 
Woodward, of Watertown, a L. M 50 00- 

West Hartford, Anson Chappell, 

personal . _ $1 00 

Legacy of Mary A. Butler, for 
A. H. M. S., by F. G. Butler, 

Executor 100 00 

110 00- 

Westport, Saugatuck, by H. C. Wood- 
worth 3 76 

Wilton, by B. Gilbert 10 00 

Winchester, by I. A. Bronson 3 71 

Windsor Locks, by J. H. Hayden, $92.69 
and $10 102 69 

Winsted, David Strong, personal 10 00 

Woman's Cong'l Home Missionary Un- 
ion of Connecticut, by Mrs. W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas., gift of Mrs. H. A. 
Perkins 300 00- 



$3,592 01 



ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society 
in June, Aaron B. Mead, Treas. 

Beardstown $15 00- 

Big Rock, special 5 09 

Bureau, in support of services 10 25 

Chebanse, special 9 29 

Chicago, Union Park 152 57 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



267 



Lake View $10 00 

Crescent 2 50 

Creston 19 85 

Crete, Rev, Samuel Porter 1 00 

De Pue, in support of services 9 75 

Kewanee (!8 (id 

Lawn Ridge, A Friend 10 00 

Malta 14 03 

Marshall 13 20 

Mention, special 25 00 

Norris City, special 13 52 

Odell, A Friend, special. 10 00 

Onarga, Second 3 50 

Princeton 30 00 

Rantoul 5 00 

South Danville, special 2 68 

Ullin, in support of services 41 00 

Woodburn, A. L. Sturges 10 00 

A Friend, special 112 90 

For evangelistic work in the country, 

special 5 00 

Bureau Association, for be Pue Mis- 
sion 140 00 

Miss Millie A. Hand, for work in South- 
ern Illinois 5 00 



$744 82 

Receijits of the Illinois Home Missionary Society 
in July, Aaron B. Mead, Treas. 

Alton, Church of the Redeemer $2 00 

Altona, M. II. Mather, special 5 00 

Aurora, First 5 65 

Beardstown, special 10 00 

Bureau, in support of services __. 7 14 

Chicago, South German 2 00 

Crete, Ladies' Missionary Soc 15 00 

De Pue, in support of services 10 75 

Farmington 49 45 

Galesburg, First Ch. of Christ, special . 25 00 

Gal va, Sunday-school 21 07 

Hinsdale 40 00 

Jacksonville 31 55 

Kewanee _ 40 25 

Lawn Ridge 20 68 

Adam Crawford. 5 00 

Mt. Forest, special 15 43 

New Grand Chain 11 00 

New "Windsor 8 50 

Norris City, special 16 71 

Paxton 22 00 

Peru 5 22 

Plymouth, Sunday-school 10 38 

Prospect Park, special 13 50 

Sunday-school, special 1 50 

Providence 8 63 

Rio, special 10 00 

Rockf ord, Second Church, Aid Soc. and 

Social Union 50 00 

Seward (Winnebago County) Sunday- 
school _ t 20 

Sublette, for De Pue Mission 5 00 

Victoria, Mrs. O. C. Ackers, special 10 00 

Wheaton, Prof. R. A. Harris, special... 7 00 

D. A. Shaw, special 1 00 

Mrs. E. Parsons, special 1 00 

Cash 23 00 

Rev. E. A. Paddock, special 300 

A Friend, special 74 68 

Bureau Association, for De Pue Mission 50 00 



$634 29 



IOWA HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Receipts of the Iowa Home Missionary Society in 

May and June, J. H. Merrill, Esq., Treas. 

Alton, earnings of Pastor at Large $27 75 

Ames, $18.44; Ladies, $6 34 44 

Atlantic, Young Ladies _ 20 00 

Aurelia 5 12 

Belknap .. 9 60 

Belle Plaine, Rev. C. H. Bissell 10 00 

Belmond _ 7 00 

Bethel, earnings of Pastor at Large 4 31 

Cass 1 80 



Central City, North Church $27 60 

Cedar Rapids 4 50 

Cluster Center, Ladies 4 00 

Cherokee, R. H. Scribnei . 50 00 

Clarion _ 18 66 

Cleveland, Eng. Ch., by Pastor at Large 25 00 

Welsh, by Pastor at Large 16 70 

Corrcctionville, earnings of Pastor at 

Large •.... 2 51 

Cromwell, Ladies 5 00 

Decorah, $83; Ladies, $30... 113 00 

Dubuque, First 64 00 

Dunlap, Ladies, $5; Young People, $5.85 10 85 

Durango 10 00 

Eldora, S. S 5 00 

Ellsworth 3 25 

Fairfax 6 50 

Fairfield, W. 11. M. U 5 00 

Fort Dodge, S. S 7 50 

Gen 1 ! Ass'ii of Iowa for L. Mp. of Dr. K. 

Adams 55 40 

Genoa Bluffs, $7.24; Ladies, $2.50 9 74 

Oilman 15 25 

Rev. and Mrs. A. S. Houston 5 00 

Givin 109 

Grant 2 00 

Green Mountain, Ladies 3 60 

Grinnell 10 50 

J. B. Grinnell, L. Mp. for Rev. Julius 

A. Reed 50 00 

Rev. T. O. Douglass| 5 00 

Hastings, Ladies 3 00 

Keokuk, Swedish Miss. Ch 4 00 

Independence, Ladies 2 00 

Larchwood 3 00 

Marion, Ladies 20 00 

Marshalltown 38 40 

Mason City, Ladies 1 00 

Milford, earnings of Pastor at Large... 18 75 

Monticello _ 5 00 

Mt. Pleasant, Ladies 5 15 

Newbury 5 00 

Newell __ 54 71 

Nora Springs, Mrs. H. B. Shaw 50 

By Evangelist Skeels 5 00 

Oskaloosa, S. S 10 00 

Otho 4 01 

Osage, Y. P. S. C. E 5 20 

Owen, First 8 00 

Peterson, earnings of Pastor at Large.. 6 13 

Reinbeck 40 01 

Rockford, Ladies 11 50 

Sergeant's Bluffs, bv Pastor at Large... 3 90 

Sloan, by Pastor at Large 5 10 

Sioux City, First. 70 00 

S. S 40 00 

Pilgrim.... 15 00 

Sheldon, Ladies 3 00 

Spencer ._ 4 00 

Strawberry Point, $32.85; S. S., $11.01.. 43 86 

Stuart 10 47 

Talmage 10 00 

Warren 3 75 

Waucoma ... 5 00 

Waverly 4 20 

W. H. M. U., Unappropriated funds 50 00 

$1,155.91 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY 
SALARIES. 

Previously acknowledged _ $5,801 93 

Connecticut, Bridgeport, $35; Chaplin, 

$2; West Hartford, $200 237 00 

District of Columbia, Washington 25 00 

Massachusetts, Boston, $189.99; Mittin- 

eague, $15 204 99 

Michigan, Bridgeport 1162 

Minnesota, Fergus Falls, $6.40; Minne- 
apolis, $5: St. Paul, $8 19 40 

New Hampshire, Keene 50 00 

New Jersey, Chester 42 00 

Rhode Island, Providence 25 00 

Vermont, St. Johnsbury 75 00 

$6,491 94 



268 THE HOME MISSIONARY. September, 1888. 

WL&xwxxCs otitic g. ga. ©V0atxi^ati0tts, 



New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org. 

1805, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Concord, Sec. 
Minnesota Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. 1872, Mrs. H. L. Chase, Minneapolis, Sec. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1880, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, Bangor, Sec. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1881, Mrs. Leroy Warren, Lansing, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 1881, Mrs. Geo. L. Epps, Topeka, Sec. 
Ohio, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1882, Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Oberlin, Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 1883, Mrs. William Spalding, 6 

Salmon Block, Syracuse, Sec. 
Wisconsin, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 1883, Mrs. C. Matter, Brodhead, Sec. 
North Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1883, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Har- 

wood, Sec. 

Wafhfngton, [ Roman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. July, 1884, Mrs. N. F. Cobleigh, 
Walla Walla, Sec. 

South Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary 
Union, org. Sept., 1884, Mrs. S. E. Young 
Sioux Falls, Sec. 



Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Jan., 1885, Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, Hart- 
ford, Sec. 
Missouri, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1885, Mrs. E. P. Bronson, 3100 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1885, Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Iowa, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

June, 1886, Miss Ella E. Marsh, Grinnell, Sec. 
California, Woman's Home Missionary Society 

org. Oct., 1887, Mrs. M. L. F. Eastman, 516 

Valencia St., San Francisco, Sec. 
Nebraska, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

Nov., 1887, Mrs. L. F. Berry, Fremont, Sec. 
Florida, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Feb. 1888, Mrs. N. Barrows, Winter 

Park, Sec. 
Indiana, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1888, Mrs.jW. E. Mossman, Fort Wayne, 

Sec. 
Southern California, Woman's Home Missionary 

Union, org. May, 1888, Mrs. H. K. W. Bent, 

Pasadena, Sec. 
Vermont, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. June, 188S, Mrs. E. C. Osgood, 14 First 

Avenue, Montpelier, Sec. " 



'SHitTxoxtt it ^Herman's <§>tatc B. 3>\. (Dvganteatitftt, 



Alabama. 

Arizona. 

Arkansas. 

Carolina;-. 

Colorado. 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Georgia. 

Idaho. 



Indian Territory. 
Kentucky. 

Louisana. 

Maryland. 

Massachusetts. 

Mississippi. 

Montana. 

Nevada. 

New Jersey. 



New Mexico. 

Pennsylvania. 

Rhode Island. 

Tennessee. 

Texas. 

Utah. 

Virginia. 

Wyoming. 



Iplxssxoniivy goscs. 

For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the homes of 
its missionaries, with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance of these favors 
i6 earnestly clicked. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribution, attention is invited 
to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, if practi- 
cable, how soon a box will probably be sent. 

3. If a family is selected without applying to the Secretaries, notify them without delay so as to 
guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. If several months should elapse before the bos is ready to be sent, ascertain from the Secre- 
taries, whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, not 
by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise as "fast freight," by railroad, 
taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in the box. 
and the money, $2, $3, or $4", according to weight and distance, for the payment of freight (if it 
cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter of acknowledgment 
should be addressed. 

6. Report to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the amount sent 
for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the Secretaries, 
put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from whom it comes, and 
the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of acknowledgment. 

8. Mark the box, 'American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New York," 
adding the name of (he place from which i( comes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing money for freight, and stating the time when and the line by 
which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide in tho assignment 
of the box. Be careful to state the sizeoi each adult, and the' age and sex of each child for whom 
the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants of the Society. It needs the same amount of 
money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no such gifts were 
provided; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or diminish their contribu- 
tions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are needful. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



"K" OXYGEN TREATMENT 

is the perfection of Oxygen and its compounds, and adapted to all forms of chronic diseases. 

A VITALIZER and NOT A DRUG. 

A specific for Asthma, Catarrh, Consumption, Debility, Dyspepsia, Rheumatism and Neuralgia. 
"Before my visit I had not been free from pain in three days. I took only one treatment, and before 
I left the parlors my pain all left me, my youth returned, and I felt like dancing a "jig." I 
have had no pain for two weeks since, and I give all the credit to " K" Oxygen. 



NKW YORK, June 18, 18S8, I 
7tli Avenue and 2Mh St. I 



K 



Send for ^K" OXYGEN TREATISE— Mailed Free. 
OXYGEN CO., 

157 West 23d St., New York. 



nE LARGE DEMAND 

FOB 

GOOD SENSE 

CORDED CORSET WAISTS 

For Ladies, Misses and Children 

gives an opportunity to unprincipled 
dealers to offer 

INFERIOR IMITATIONS 

under various names, npon 

which they can make a larger 

profit.saying they are"about 

as good as the GOOD 

SENSE Waist." 

THEY ARE NOT AS GOOD. 

WBe sure your Corset is 

stamped "Good Sense." 

Sold by all Leading Retailers. 

Send for Circular. 

CCDDIC DCflC Mannfactnrers, 

_ rcnnlo DflUo. NEWYOKK 

.RSHALL FIELD &. CO. Chicago 

WHJULK8ALK WESTELKSi AttEJiTS. 




fe. k5. k^. 



For the Blood. 



AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT. 



About six weeks ago, while at business, I was 
suddenly attacked with excruciating pains in my 
feet, knees and hands. So severe the attack that 
I took my bed immediately, and in two days my 
joints were swollen almobt double their natural 
size, and sleep was driven from me. After suffer- 
ing most severe pain a week, using liniments and 
other remedies, a friend who sympathized with 
my helpless condition, who knew the virtue of 
" S. S. S.," said to me, "Why don't you get 
Swift's Specific and use it? I will guarantee a 
cure, and if it does not the medicine shall cost 
younothing." I at once procured the " S. S. S.' 
and after using it the first day had a quiet night 
and refreshing sleep. In three weeks I could sit 
up and walk about the room. After using six bot- 
tles I was able to go to business. Since then I 
have been regularly at my post of duty, and stand 
on my feet from nine to ten hours a day, entirely 
free from pain. These are the plain and simple 
facts in my case. I will cheerfully answer all 
inquiries relative thereto, either in person or by 
mail. All sufferers from Rheumatism should cer- 
tainly use "S. S. S." Thomas Markelee, 
11 W. 18th St., New York. 

Treatise on blood and skin diseases mailed free. 

THE SWIFT SPECIFIC COMPANY, 

756 Broadway, New York. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



China Mattings are being more extensively used every year. The colorings and designs being 
artistic and goods inexpensive and durable. From the low price in white of ^.75 per roll 40 yards. 
Fancy from $4.00. Japanese seamless, from $5.00 roll. Extensive assortment in fine Fancy, 
White and Damask Patterns at low prices. 



CARPETINCS. 



We are displaying a large line in Ingrains. Brussels. Velvet, Moquettes, Axminsters. and they 
should be seen to be appreciated. Our line of Mats and Rugs should not be overlooked. Sizes 
from lsx 36 inches to 12x15 feet. Chairs and Rockers have recently been added to stock. Ladies' 
Sewing Rockers, at 75c. Children's Chairs. 25c. A full line of Hotel. Balcony and Porch Chairs. 
Also Upholstered Chairs and Rockers at very close prices. Inspection invited. 



ANDREW 

Near Eighth Street, 



LESTER'S SONS, 

739 & 741 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY, 



MARVELOUS 

MEMORY 

DISCOVERY. 

Wholly unlike artificial systems. 
Cure of mind wandering. 
Any book learned in one reading. 
Classes of 1087 at Baltimore, 1005 at Detroit, 
1500 at Philadelphia, 1113 at Washington, 
1216 at Boston, large classes of Columbia Law 
students, at Yale, Wellesley, Oberlin, University 
of Penn., Michigan University, Chautauqua, &c. 
&c. Indorsed by Richard Proctor, the scien- 
tist, Huns. W. W. Astor, Judaii P. Benjamin, 
Judge Gibson, Dr. Brown, E. H. Cook, Prin. 
N. Y. State Normal College, <fec. Taught by 
correspondence. Prospectus post free from 
PROF. L01SETTE, 237 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 




MENEELT & COMPANY, 
WEST TROY, N. Y„ BELLS, 

For Churches, Schools, etc. , also Chimes 
and Peals. For more than half a century 
noted for superiority over all others. 



Cincinnati BellFoundry Co 



SUCCESSORS IN BLYMYER BELLS TO THE . 

BLYMYER MANUFACTURING CO 

— CATALOGUE WITH 1800 TESTIMONIALS ~ 



IELLS.CHURCH.SCHOOL.FIRE ALARM 



CLINTON H. MENEELY BELL CO. 

TROY, NEW YORK, 

Manufacture Superior., 
CHURCH and SCHOOL BELLS. 



THE " MICRO - AUDIPHONE," FOR DEAFNESS. 
Call or address for book, 1286 Broadway, N. Y 



ADVICE TO MOTHERS. 

MRS. WINSLOW'S 

SOOTHING SYRUP 

Should always be used for children teething. It soothes 
the child, softens the gums, allays all pain, cures wind 
colic, and is the best remedy for diarrhoea. Twenty- 
flve cents a. bottle. 



NOTICE 

TO 

ADVERTISERS. 



All Letters, Orders or Communications 
in reference to advertising in 

Tr^e Son\e JVEi^ioqkfy 

should be addressed to 

The ARGUS PRINTING CO, 

44 Montgomery Street, 

JEESEY CITT, 1ST. J\ 

150 Nassau Street, 

3STIEW YORK CITY. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



The Argus Printing Co. 

No. 44 Montgomery Street, 

JERSEY CITY. 

New York Office, - - 150 Nassau Street. 
<» — 

OUR JOB DEPARTMENT. 

T T AVING recently added the latest styles of type, and all modern improve- 
ments pertaining to this department, and employing the best workmen, 
we are prepared to execute First-class Printing at moderate prices. 



OUR BOOK DEPARTMENT. 

TN this department we are second to none in the State. With a large force 
of compositors, and the only type-setting machines in New Jersey, we can 
furnish all classes of Book and Law Printing with great despatch. 



OUR PRESSWORK DEPARTMENT, 

/"YCCUPYING three floors of our magnificent building, and filled with the 
^ latest improved machinery, is able to cope with any house in New York 
as to prices and speed in turning out all kinds of presswork. 



OUR ELECTROTYPING DEPARTMENT 

IS a new departure in the printing trade in Jersey City, and with the newest 
labor-saving machinery, we can guarantee PERFECT WORK and entire satis- 
faction with the productions of this department. 



ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED. 



<j>- 



THE HOME MISSIUXABY. 



X-» H° me lMi ss i° nar y 



Advertising Department. 

HpHE attention of the readers of THE HOME MIS- 
SIONARY, and of business men generally, is called 
to its advantages as an advertising medium. It has a 
large circulation, covering the whole countrv, and the use 
of its pages cannot fail to secure the most satisfactory 
returns. Address, 

The Argus Printing Co. 

44 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J. 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price could not 
well be less. Its whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they prefer to pay, 
it will be sent without further charge, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members; Missionaries 
of the Society and its Auxiliaries; Ministers seeurlng a yearly collection for it in their Congregations; 
also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy for every ten dollars collected and 
paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. Pas- 
tors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this Journal at the 
Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 



APPLICATIONS FOR AID. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should make 
a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an applicatiou. Taey 
«hould also give these particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations. 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office address : Town, County, State. 

Does he reside on his field of labor ? Is he installed pastor ? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry ? 

Of what local church is he a member? 

Of what Ministerial Association ? 

The number of persons composing his'family. 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people, and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage? 

Is aid expected from any other source? 

The leabt amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. S. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to the Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the conditions, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by the 
trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose limits the congregation is found, has a " Committee 
of Missions, " the members of that Committee should certify these statements, the standing of the 
minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no such " Committee 
of Missions' 11 exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more neighboring clergymen 
acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet gathered, applicants will follow 
the same course as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary of the 
Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application ; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing all the 
particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To this the certificate of the missionary that the 
congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 



FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall 

act as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the 
year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said 
Society, and under its direction, 



SEPTEMBER, 1§8§. 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible House, *lstor Place, JVew York. 



Rev. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 
Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D., ) „ ^ . . ^ „ 
Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D.D., } Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. CLAPP, D.D., Treasurer. 

Executive Committee:— Mr. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; Mr. WM. HENRY SMITH; Rev. WM. M. 
TAYLOR, D. D.; Mr. CHARLES H. PARSONS; Mr. ALBERT WOODRUFF; Rev. JAMES G. 
ROBERTS, D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; Mr. JOSEPH WM. RICE; Mr. HERBERT 
M. DIXON ; Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D.; Rev. ROBERT R. MEREDITH, D. D.; Mr. FRANCIS 
FLINT; Mr. JAMES MITCHELL; Mr. ASA A. SPEAR; WM. IVES WASHBURN, Esq., Record- 
ing Secretary. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for 

Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, and to the Woman's 
Department, maybe addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y, 



DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS, 

In Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders ; also Communications relating to the 
business matters of The Home Missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be addressed 
to Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Post-Office Orders should be drawn on STATION D, New York City. 

A Payment of $50 constitutes a Life Member. 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Clark C. Otis, Financial Superintendent, Bible House, New York. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, Work among Bohemians, Poles, etc., Cleveland, O. 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, Work among Germans, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandinavians, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Rev. Leroy Warren Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. Edw. D. Curtis Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rev. J. H. Morley Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Franklin B. Doe St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. 

Rev. E. L. Hood Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

Rev. R. A. Beard ..Seattle, Wash. Ter. 

Rev. Geo A.Hood, Ashland, Wis. 



Rev. John L. Maile Omaha, Neb. 

Rev. Hiram D. Wiard Mitchell, Dak. 

Rev. H. C. Simmons Fargo, No. Dak. 

Rev. C. M. Sanders .Denver, Col. 

Rev. W. S. Hawkes Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. J. H. Warren, D.D. ._ San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. G. H. Atkinson, D.D Portland, Or. 

Rev.T. W. Jones, 34 Bible House.New York City. 



SECRETARIES AND TREASURERS 

OF THE AUXILIARIES. 

Rev. JONATHAN E. ADAMS, D. D., Secretary, Maine Missionary Society Bangor, Me. 

JOHN L. CROSBY, Esq., Treasurer " Bangor, Me. 

Rev. EDWARD H. GREELEY, D.D., Secretary, New Hampshire Home Miss. Soc. Concord, N. H. 

Hon. LYMAN D. STEVENS, Treasurer •' " Concord, N. H. 

Rev. CHARLES H. MERRILL, Secretary Vermont Domestic " St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

J. C. EMERY, Esq., Treasurer " " Montpelier, Vt. 

Rev. JOSHUA COIT, Secretary Massachusetts Home " (22 Congr. House, 

Rev. EDWIN B. PALMER, Treasurer " " ) Boston, Mass. 

Rev. ALEXANDER McGREGOR, Secretary.. Rhode Island " " Pawtucket, R. I. 

EDWIN BARROWS, Esq., Treasurer " " " Providence, R. I. 

Rev. WILLIAM H. MOORE, Secretary Missionary Soc. of Connecticut. Hartford, Conn. 

WARD W. JACOBS, Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. AUGUSTUS G. UPTON, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society Syracuse, N. Y. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " " New York City. 

Rev. J. G. FRASER, Secretary Ohio " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

ALEX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer " " " New York City. 

Rev. JAMES T0MPKIN8,Secretary Illinois " " I 151 Washington St., 

AARON B. MEAD, Esq., Treasurer " " " ( Chicago, Illinois. 

Rev. T. G. GRASSIE, Secretary Wisconsin " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. A. McCOLLOUGH, Esq., Treasurer " " " Milwaukee, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. DOUGLASS, Secretary Iowa " " Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. MERRILL, Esq., Treasurer " " " Des Moiues, Iowa- 



The Argus Printing Company, New York and Jersey City. 



^k€A/K/„ 7^^4~ c^fe^p 

" THE ^/v 

Home Missionaky. 




// 



OCTOBER., 1888. 



CONTENTS 



THE NEW SECRETARY 280 

TRAINING-SCHOOL FOR HOME 

MISSIONARIES 269 

NOVEL SURPRISE PARTY 272 

A CURIOUS BLUNDER 272 

PROBLEMS 273 

UTAH 277 

" AN EVENING IN SWEDEN.". . ..278 
A MUCH NEEDED SUPPLEMENT.278 

FRENCH EVANGELIZATION 279 

A VOICE FROM THE WILDER- 
NESS 282 

OUR MAGAZINE 288 

TO ALL GOOD CITIZENS 285 

A LETTER 286 

" HAIL AND FAREWELL." 287 

SELF-SACRIFICE 288 

MOCK SERVICES 289 

HIS CUP IS FULL 289 

BIG HORN, WYOMING 290 

HELENA, MONTANA 290 

PLAIN WORDS 291 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 292 

Southern California 292 

New York 292 

Epaproioditus Boxes 293 

Extract from a Letter 294 

Our Society 294 

Timely Blinds 296 

Christian Economy 297 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 297 

Prue's Missionary Money 297 

How to be Hafpy 299 

Questions 299 

Old Spec 300 

The Blanket Indians 301 

AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDU- 
CATION SOCIETY 302 

Whitman College 302 

APPOINTMENTS 304 

RECEIPTS 304 

WOMAN'S STATE HOME MIS- 
SIONARY ORGANIZATIONS. .811 

MISSIONARY BOXES 312 



Vol. LXL No. 6. 



NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Bible House, Astor Place. 



SISTT CENTS A ?EA2, UT ADVANCE, P0STA3E PAIS. 



RHTKKED AT THE POST OFFICE AT NEW YORK, N. Y., A3 BECONT) CLASS [MAIL] MATTER. 



THE 

HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Preach the Gosfei Mark xvi. 15. 

Bow 8hal] they preach except Hiey be sent? Rom. x. 15. 

VOL. LXI. OCTOBER, 1888. No. 0. 

THE NEW SECRETARY. 

The readers of The Home Missionary by turning to the last page of the 
cover will learn that the Society has a new Secretary. The familiar name 
of Dr. Barrows disappears, and that of ltev. William Kincaid, D. D., 
takes its place. Such changes are of vast interest to the cause of Home 
Missions. In the universal regret attending the withdrawal of Dr. 
Barrows it is no small satisfaction that the vacancy thus created is so 
speedily and so worthily filled. 

Dr. Kincaid is a graduate ofOberlin, was -first settled at Leavenworth, 
Kansas, afterwards at Oberlin, Ohio, and Oswego, New York. From the 
last named pastorate he was called to the service of the American Board 
as District Secretary for the Middle States, with office at New York City. 
In this position for the past three years he has commended himself 
most warmly to the esteem and confidence of the churches. The Board 
had still higher position to offer, and part with him reluctantly. Most 
gladly the Home Missionary Society welcomes him to its own division of 
the one great army and regards it as a bright augury of his success that 
the call commends itself so warmly to his favor and that most cordial 
responses from all parts of the field have greeted his decision. Dr. 
Kincaid will enter upon active service October 1, and will go westward 
from the annual meeting of the Board at Cleveland to attend the State 
Associations of Colorado, Kansas, and Nebraska, in the character of Home 
Missionary Secretary. We affectionately commend him to our churches 
and their pastors, throughout the land. 



TRAINING-SCHOOL FOR HOME MISSIONARIES. 

The problem of securing a supply of ministers and missionaries 
sufficient for existing churches and for the new work constantly opening 
as Christ's kingdom advances at home and abroad, is a very serious one. 



270 THE HUME M1SS1UXAEY. October, 

The laborers are few in comparison with the work that is to be done. 
We need a fifth more ministers than we have, to man, properly, existing 
churches. For the new churches constantly being organized and for the 
foreign missionary work still more men are needed. 

During the last fifteen years the aggregate number of students in our 
Congregational seminaries has increased only sixty-six, and only two of 
this number are college graduates. The colleges are not furnishing pro- 
portionately as many men for the ministry as formerly. The lack of 
ministers is felt most seriously in the smaller churches, where the attrac- 
tions are fewer and the self-denials greater. At the West especially, men 
are drawn from every available source to meet the needs of the increasing 
churches. Not a few of them have had a limited education. 

The difficulty of securing a sufficient number of ministers to supply 
the rapidly-increasing number of churches in Michigan has led them to 
consider the question of establishing a training-school in which to gather 
pious men, who are inclined and seem to be qualified by grace to do 
Christian work, and give them a better furnishing than they would other- 
wise have to do the work of the ministry. A committee to whom this 
matter was referred reported to the General Association of that State at 
its late meeting, advising and justifying, in the interest of the home 
missionary work .there and through the West, the establishment of suck 
a training-school or seminary in that State. The committee says: 

w Such a training-school is raised in the interest of a higher educa- 
tion, not to lower the tone. To our mind the question has been from 
the outset, Where can this best be done for us ? In our opinion, the 
time is coming when this question must be asked by each home mission- 
ary State, if we are to cope with the great work before us as a nation. If 
we can get the most good men, educated in the best way, for our ho.ae 
missionary work at great centers like Oberlin and Chicago, in connection 
with men of a different culture, and by doubling the work of the pro- 
fessors, then that is the best for us. If they can stand it, let us send our 
men there. But if we can get more men — better men for our home mission- 
ary fields, educate them more simply but more efficiently in our own State, 
with the undivided strength and time of a professor or professors (as the 
case may be) who can give their whole energy to the problem of raising 
up a specially trained Congregational home missionary force, then that 
is best, even if it costs more. Now your committee report in favor of 
the latter course : 

"(1) Because the single and simple aim of such an institution would 
be to educate men for the missionai'y work. 

"(2) We favor this training-school because we think the education of 
a special class of students can best be done in a separate school. We so 
think because, while there are many manifest advantages offered by suck 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 271 

a seminary as Oberlin or Chicago, the class of men we are seeking to ai<l 
are as often confused as helped by the very advantages offered. 

''('■">) Bui we favor a Michigan training-school because, even if the 
system of classical and English courses combined might be considered 
best, yet we have in this country very \\-w theological seminaries for our 
constituency of churches. 

"(4) Again, we recommend that such a school be founded, because 
ure believe it to be feasible. It is not necessary to begin on a large scale, 
miliary ever has. Your committee has considered the financial 
aspects of the matter, and believe that they can be met without interfer- 
ing with our elfort to become self-supporting in our State home mission- 
ary work. 

"For reasons given, we favor the attempt. Olivet College has 
expressed her willingness to open her doors to us if we go there for our 
school. Lansing is ready to offer a suitable building, costing $25,000, 
but purchasable for 810,000. Part of this sum is already subscribed by 
citizens of Lansing, if we select that city for our location. Our inquiries 
reveal the fact that more than forty men in Michigan are ready to study. 
Their average age is about twenty-four. Half of them are able to sup- 
port themselves. Cutting this number down to the most desirable candi- 
dates, we could begin with from ten to twenty men out of these forty 
who apply. This would be better than more, as we should be obliged to 
start with only one or two teachers. If our school must have its day of 
small things, let us begin now, so as to meet the future with days of 
larger things. 

"If this great nation of ours needs more men, better men, more institu- 
tions for ministerial training and greater adaptability in our education to 
our many-sided problems, then, if some State should lead the way. why 
not Michigan, the foremost Congregational State of the great West?" 

We most heartily sympathize with these Michigan brethren in the 
desire to meet the present want of the churches for more ministers. As 
the number of college graduates offering themselves is so inadequate it 
may be well to open a training-school like this one to better qualify some 
men from business life who are inclined to enter the ministry. If the 
institution is established we shall expect that its standard will be grad- 
ually raised, till it will in the end come to be much like our other semi- 
naries. — Vermont Chronicle. 



Members of Young Ladies' Circles who are interested to raise money 
for the Swedish Fuxd this year, will find use for Superintendent 
Montgomery's new Sunday-school concert exercise, " An Evening in 
Sweden." 



272 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

NOVEL SURPRISE PARTY. 

The evening for the prayer-meeting had come, and as the weather 
was lowering the pastor concluded that the attendance would he small, 
But to his surprise there was twice the usual number present. The front 
seats were all occupied, filling up the ''great gulf" which usually sepa- 
rated pastor and people. There was also an unusual readiness in the 
brethren to take part in the meeting. A happiness beamed from each 
countenance, which the pastor interpreted as meaning that it was "good 
to be there." He was unable to account for the sudden and unusual 
interest until one of the brethren, several days afterward, handed him a 
postal card, saying, "I wish you to read this card to learn what kind of 
a man you have in your church." The card was follows: 

"Dear Brethren, — Let us all turn out to the prayer meeting to-night,' 
take front seats and allow no pauses. Speak to all you meet, and let us give 
the minister such a surprise party as he will not forget for one while. 
Aaron Hur." 

Twenty-five cards like this were mailed, and the pastor has never for- 
gotten that surprise party. The people enjoyed it as much as he did, 
and seemed quite as much surprised that they could have such an 
interesting meeting. 

We wish there were more of " that kind of men," like " Aaron Hur " 
in our churches, to stir them up. 



A Curious Blunder. — In The Home Missionary for September, 
the illustration " A few oi Mrs. Pickett's Cowboys" should have been 
entitled "A Mining Camp in Colorado." As this group of men are 
strangers to Mrs. Pickett, and bear not the slightest resemblance to her 
" boys " Ave hasten to correct an unfortunate mistake, hoping in a future 
number to present our readers with an authorized vision of " Mrs. 
Pickett's Cowboys in Costume." 



Rev. Charles A. Mack, Sanborn, Barnes Co., Dakota, is trying to 
raise $7,000 for a "Ladies' Hall" for Fargo College, which is to be a 
memorial to his wife, Helen Strickland Mack, and to be called " Strick- 
land Cottage." This college, which is the "cherished educational 
institution of the Congregational churches of North Dakota, greatly needs 
the building; and the many warm friends of Mrs. Mack — who died on 
missionary ground — will be glad to help erect » tribute to her memory. 
Religion and Education must go hand in hand if we are to win the vast 
Territory of Dakota for Christ. 

Rev. Geo. Marsh, formerly of Elk Falls,Kansas, has moved to Kahoka, 
Clark Co., Mo. Will friends who supply him with reading matter please 
note the change? 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 273 

PROBLEMS. 
By Rev. W. S. IIawkes, Supebesttendent, Utah, Idaho, and W. Montana. 

I believe in patriotism, and teach that before love to one's self, or 
one's family, and next to love for God, should come love for country. 
Twenty-four years ago, in my boyhood, I served my country four months 
as a private soldier in the ranks. And I believe that the Christian 
patriot has now as truly a mission as in the years from 18G1 to 1805. lie- 
fore 1885 I thought I was thoroughly penetrated with a proper spirit for 
the evangelization of our great country, with a desire that as it had 
been, so it might continue to be, for God and truth. I had taught the 
need of, and prayed, and given for the evangelization of the South and 
West, the white, black, red, and yellow races of those sections, not for- 
getting the Canadian French and Indians, who now, as well as in 
Colonial days, are making incursions into New England; then, with arts 
of war, now with arts of peace; but always for spoil, both then and now. 

But I must confess that not until 1883 was I aroused to a just appre- 
ciation of the magnitude of the task which God has set before the present 
generation of American Christians. In the spring of 1884 a "Nebraska 
Home Missionary came to my Massachusetts church, and in an enthusiastic 
address on the greatness of the trans-Mississippi West, declared that the 
one State of Texas was large enough to hold the whole world's population 
without crowding. That staggered one of my good deacons, whose ideas 
of dimensions Avere formed by New England, out of which he had never 
been; and he would have no more of that missionary. This episode set 
me to studying, and on Fast Day, soon after, T placed before him such 
an array of facts that he, as well as his pastor, was better informed from 
that day forward. When first looked at, it is an amazing fact that if we 
reckon the world's population at the outside estimate of fourteen hun- 
dred million people, they could all be put into the area of Texas, and if 
divided into families of eight — father, mother, and six children — each of 
those families could have an acre of land apiece. But so the figures will 
show each time a computation is made from official data. I also found 
that the two States of Kansas and Nebraska, with the Territory of 
Dakota, would take another earth's population and give each man, woman, 
and child a seventh of an acre apiece. Besides, we have all the rest of the 
eastern slope of the Rockies, and this wonderful inter-mountain region, 
both here and north of us. .... 

Although the Eastern States have well-established institutions of edu- 
cation and religion, and at present detain only a small part of the 
immigration, yet they find themselves in a steady struggle to maintain 
the purity and fruitfuluess of those institutions; they have no more than 
held their own in the last twenty-five years; and some of the State and 
local governments have been well rocked. ... If the East is catch- 



274 THE HOME MISSION ART. October, 

ing only a part of the inflow and yet is so much disturbed, we may well 
ask ourselves what will be the condition of our great West, politically, 
socially, morally, and religiously, where the vast majority of the immi- 
grants are coming, unless we have the most approved agencies at work 
to mold and guide them. In this Territory of Utah, we have a problem 
all our own. We see a social, moral, and religious condition, yes, and 
political, too, dissimilar to anything else in our country. This semi- 
barbarous state of things is due to the absence of pure religion and good 
schools, or Christian education. If the first generation of Mormons born 
in this Territory had been educated as the first generation born in New 
England was educated, it would long ago have discovered the ridiculous 
deceptions and blunders of the Book of Mormon, as well as have been 
disgusted with its practices, and horrified with its unclean iniquities. 
But they were left in ignorance, and now we all suffer from it; that 
Mormon generation most of all. . . . Meantime the population here 
has gone on increasing naturally, perhaps more properly speaking un- 
naturally, and also by immigration, and the dire need growing greater 
all the while. What this state of society would have produced if left to 
itself, is an appalling thought. I believe less than fifty years would 
have produced anarchy ani bloodshed. What it would have brought to 
our country at large is a still more appalling thought; and what we shall 
suffer from it unless we more earnestly bestir ourselves is a matter for 
most serious consideration. 

A friend tells us that just fifty-five years ago he drove into Chicago 
one evening, and, unable to find food enough for his jaded horses, was 
obliged to seek shelter for man and beast some ten miles beyond. His 
bed was of dried leaves in a hollow in the earthen floor. The igno- 
rance was dense, as a well-worn story of that time signifies. It goes on 
this wise: — A man came into one of these settlements and inquired of a 
woman, (i Are there any Episcopalians about here?" " Episcolopians," 
replied the woman, "Episcolopians? I guess not. My husband hain't 
shot any! " But then, soon after, came the tide of immigration from the 
East in which there were wise and consecrated men, who kept abreast of 
its front wave, and who were there "for God and Native Land," to 
organize churches, and to found Christian schools and colleges. And 
while they were doing that which it is now so easy to see was a most 
nobly Christian patriotic work, there were, so-called, Christian men in 
the East, aye, in my own New England, sad as it is to confess, who 
ridiculed such efforts. One of these divines said of a movement to 
found one of those Western Christian colleges,— " Oh, yes! they are 
going to Illinois to found a college. They are going to kindle a fire 
there and pour on oil, till its blaze shall illumine the tops of the Rocky 
Mountains!" It was a prophecy, although not so intended. To-day 
these colleges are supplying more ministers for our Home, and even our 
Foreign Missions than our old, and now rich, New England colleges 



L888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 275 

And the blaze from the oil on the fire has already illumined the tops of 
the Rockies; and graduates from colleges which are almost children of 
those which the New England man stigmatized, are helping to illumine 
our inter-mountain darkness; a work, in importance, second to none 
attempted during this century. 

Illinois College at Jacksonville was organized by two men and three 
women " in a log school-house with a puncheon floor, a chimney built of 
mud and sticks, and with no other furniture, than a few rude seats made 
of split logs, with holes bored in the end and sticks driven in for legs." 
But it was lor God and his Church, and God was with it. . . . 

Now, west of the Mississippi, we have a country every way greater 
than that east of it, which has been molded during the past fifty years. 
And this greater country is filling up faster than the other did, and not 
with sons and daughters of New England, or her grandsons and grand- 
daughters either; but very largely with foreign emigrants from North- 
ern and Central Europe who are moved by desire for gain; these million 
souls who are yearly pushing this way across the Mississippi, spreading 
over these mountains and into these gulches and canons, are coming in 
under worldly impulse alone, seeking homes, and burning with a desire 
to accumulate riches. The word has gone out through the Old World as 
a fact that on our western lands a common man with health and industry 
can get a competency, if not riches, in ten years. Many have done it. 
So the living tide rolls in. They have no ark of the covenant with them 
ami are led by no pillar of cloud by day, or fire by night; not even by a 
Moses, a Joshua, or a Caleb. It is indeed true, that some who entered 
our wonderful valley were inspired by a Joseph, and led by a Brigham; 
but oh! such a Joseph! such a Brigham! Has Joseph Cook rightly named 
the latter " America's indigenous devil ?" . 

If these fair portions of our land are left to themselves,— if the peo- 
ple are simply left alone to plow and dig for riches, without Sunday- 
schools, churches, Christian academies and colleges, it will require only 
the time of one generation to produce a dreary moral waste; there will be 
no intelligent and uprightly conscientious leaders of public sentiment to 
tone up and guide the people. Money-bags, pistols, mobs, and lust will 
rule. In The Salt Lake Tribune, Ave read: " Who can doubt that a 
vastly different state of society would now exist here if Christian preachers 
and teachers had been as abundant here for the last forty years as they 
have been on the Western Reserve of Ohio? Who can doubt but that 
temporal prosperity would be much greater? Who can doubt but that 
Utah would have been a powerful and influential State of the Union for 
the last dozen years?" 

We should neither disguise nor fear the magnitude of the task before 
us. The children of those west of the Mississippi are to hold the 
balance of political power by the year 1900; the center of population is 
already west of Indianapolis, and long before 1900 will be at, or west of, 



276 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

the Mississippi; but a very large proportion of unhopeful elemeuts are 
here where we have the fewest Christian churches, colleges, and schools. 
And it as useless to think of educating the youths of these people and of 
this section with the schools and colleges of the East or Interior as to 
think of serving the people of Utah with the churches of New England 
or Illinois. . . 

And so I rejoice in our Hammond Hall of Salt Lake Academy, which 
I hope to yet see a grand and useful Christian college, with Provo, Ogden, 
Park City, and perhaps other academies as naturaFfeeders. The Chris- 
tian Church has pointed out the need of them here. The Christian Church 
was the first to demand them, the first to plant them, and the constant 
nursing father and mother of them. Hammond Hall has already done 
enough to be a prophecy of what these others will do. And then these 
New West free schools established with so bountiful a hand, and so 
wonderfully irrigating the moral deserts about them! Could anything 
but the Gospel have suggested, produced, or supported them? What 
infidel or skeptic can satisfactorily account for them on any other hypoth- 
esis than that of the Christian Gospel? Free school houses like those of 
Lynne, and the 10th Ward of Salt Lake City, academy buildings like 
those of Hammond Hall, Provo, and Ogden, are monuments of Christ's love 
more valuable and enduring than the pyramids of Egypt. . . . 

Here in Utah we have a broad and mighty current of humanity full of 
motion, but a turbid stream. By its side is the fountain of life, the 
Gospel of Christ. And out of it steadily welling up are these pure 
currents of evangelical churches and Christian schools; and the streams 
of influence which they send out into the turbid current of society here is 
now of such a volume and always has been of such distinct purity that 
every honest spectator on the bank of the current of Time can readily 
see it. I thank God for such pure Springs of Life here in this moral 
desert. These, and many more like them, are not only to irrigate it but 
to save it and to help make Utah a great and good State. . . . 

In 1884 I said at the General Association of Massachusetts the follow- 
ing: "For one I can say I have little money I can give. But I have 
seven sons and daughters, all consecrated to God, on the days of their 
birth, and I would rather have them become foreign or home missionaries 
than anything else in the world. And the Spirit has so stirred my own 
heart in this matter, that for the sake of serving Jesus in this home 
missionary problem I would be willing to live another human life before 
the fruition of heaven; and even now if I should hear the Lord calling 
me toward that arduous but blessed work, I should feel like saying — 
'Speak; for thy servant heareth.'" Just a year ago the Lord made 
such a call; and here I am, and I thank God for it. — Salt Lake Tribune. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 277 

UTAH. 

Every mission field has its own peculiarities. Utah is more a 
foreign than a home field. One feels as if he were in a foreign nation 
as soon as he reaches this Territory, and that feeling grows as he becomes 
acquainted with the social, religious, and business habits of the people, 
and with the government, where that is still in the hands of the people. 

The Mormons regard all non-Mormons as foreigners who have no right 
to come here, and to whom would be giveu no rights if the Mormons 
could do as they would like. How slowly this prejudice gives way to 
the new conditions which outside immigration brings, may be seen in 
many ways. The Mormons claim to take care of all their poor. It is 
miserable care which some of them get, but one not a Mormon has no 
help from the Mormon church, and the town and county authorities refuse 
aid to the poor. The government is so absolutely simply a church doing 
temporal business that uothing is done which it would be inconsistent for 
the church to do. And they regard every stranger as belonging to some 
church, and demand that every church take care of its own poor. A 
woman was found on the street having fallen in a fit. The city authori- 
ties refused help, until they were driven to do something by the crowd 
which gathered. The real question was, " What church does she belong 
to ?" and because she belonged to no church she had no friends, in the 
eyes of police, marshals, and Mormon officials. 

Churches are regarded here as the same sort of an innovation that 
rival political governments might be considered. They are not con- 
sidered as merely new parties or disturbing elements, but as governments. 
And it is not difficult to understand how, with such sentiments, those 
who breakaway from the Mormon church think of liberty as freedom from 
all restraint. Some get the idea of loyalty to the United States govern- 
ment, and they boast of their loyalty to the nation, instead of to " any 
religion. " They really regard religion as incompatible with loyalty to the 
government. " I don't belong to no religion," is the boast of many, 
with a peculiar emphasis on religion. 

This feeling on the part of the Mormons makes this field a peculiar one 
for missionary work. One advantage is that the apparent strength of the 
organization which supports a work impresses the people as much as the 
direct work of the missionary can. They are beginning to see that there 
is power and aggressive energy outside of the Mormon church. They 
estimate their own success by the rapid progress of mission work here, 
and they sometimes feel that they are behind in the race. 

But the worst feature is that the system has not developed any spiritual 
power. Many of the people seem to have no place in their natures for a 
thought of spiritual life to take hold. Religion is but a mere matter of 
business, and they do not see in the real Christian work that is being done 
anything more than this. They are apt to demand of mission enterprises 



278 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

what they might demand of business corporations or of the government — 
as if somewhere 'there is a full treasury from which somebody will draw, 
and if they patronize the institution they ought to share in the profits. 

This is one side of the work. When sowing beside all waters let not 
the Church of Christ forget Utah, and the great need to send the Gospel 
here. — Rev. A. J. Bailey, Ogden, Utah. 



"AN EVENING IN SWEDEN." 

The above is the title to a Sunday-school concert exercise by Superim 
tendent M. W. Montgomery. The following programme, full of fresh 
themes for Sunday-schools, has so much of variety and interest that it 
cannot fail, if properly set forth, to make a very entertaining concert. 

" A map talk about Scandinavia " 3 minutes. 

" The Flags of Scandinavia ;" by the boys 1 minute. 

" The Northmen." 4 minutes. 

" Customs in Sweden and Norway ;" by a class of boys 5 minutes. 

" The Free Church Revival in Sweden " 5 minutes. 

" The Lord's Supper Societies in Sweden " 3 minutes. 

" Swedish Politeness ;" by a class of girls 3 minutes. 

" Swedish Manners ;" by a class of girls 3 minutes. 

" A Swedish Family at the Breakfast Table " 3 minutes. 

" Persecutions in Sweden " •' 3 minutes. 

" Scandinavians Beguiled into Mormonism " 3 minutes. 

" Swedish Lady Costumes ;" conducted by the ladies 4 minutes. 

" Scandinavians in the United States;" by a class of young men, or 

young ladies 3 minutes. 

' ' Missions among the Scandinavians ;" by a class of young men, 

or young ladies 4 minutes. 

Now ready for distribution. Address orders or inquiries to The 
American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, New York. 



A MUCH-NEEDED SUPPLEMENT. 

Some time ago an appeal for funds to aid in establishing a reading- 
room in Carrington, Dakota, was made through TJie Home Missionary. 
For the benefit of those who contributed so generously to this good cause 
I send a brief recapitulation of the work of the past year (1887). When 
the reading-room was oiiened a place was chosen, conspicuous for its 
nearness to the worst saloon in town — if, indeed, there are any degrees 
in such a nefarious business. A single partition separated the two places, 
and often the loud talk and coarse jest stirred the righteous indignation 
of those who had come in for a quiet time of reading. Sometimes we 
feared a mistake had been made in coming so near a country where 
Satan ruled, but time has not only corrected our forobodings, but has 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 279 

proved the wisdom of the step we took in the beginning, for, witness the 
result. Not a trace of said saloon-keeper can be found this year, and his 
former quarters are now in use by the reading-room, having been rented 
for that purpose. Praise God for the victory ! Is it illogical to con- 
clude that this emissary of the evil one felt himself too uncomfortably 
near good influences, and thought his only safe (?) way was to betake 
himself from them? 

The reading-room has accomplished the chief thing we hoped for it, 
when we organized it, — a counter-attraction to the siren-like influence of 
the saloons. No eastern reader can conceive how attractive these places 
are made. Given, however, a warm, cheerful room, with plenty of good 
books, games, pictures, etc., and the average boy will invariably liud him- 
self drawn thither. Such has been our experience, at least. 

But the patronage has by no means been confined to the boys. Night 
after night finds a certain old man here, who by some unknown affinity, 
is uncle to everybody, lie is kind-hearted, but rarely attends church, and 
makes no profession of Christianity. Let us hope that the seed may 
there be sown which shall prove the germ of a new life. 

A mother of three boys came to me one day with fifty cents, saying at 
the time that she could not give much, but she wished to help on the work 
and show her appreciation of what she felt was being done for the young 
people. Interesting testimony might be multiplied if space permitted. 
It will be sufficient to say, however, that the work has been steadily 
growing into the hearts of the people, and friends are being raised up for 
it. New books and papers of the best kind have found their way thither, 
and. we trust, are fulfilling their mission of love. 

To those friends who made this good work possible, let me say that 
God's approval has evidently rested upon it, since he has blessed it so 
abundantly. The eagerness with which many read and re-read every 
serap they can get is most touching. Next to the church, as a factor in 
evangelizing these new western towns, comes the good reading-room. 
It supplements the work of the church, and in fact, often reaches a class 
over whom the church seems to have no power. — Mrs. C. G. Tobey. 

"Facts are the fingers of God. To know the facts of Modern 
Missions is the necessary condition of intelligent interest." 



FRENCH EVANGELIZATION. 

Rev. Calvin E. Amaron, Principal of the French Protestant College, 

Springfield, Mass. 

The work of evangelization among the French in New England is of 
comparatively recent date. The churches have not yet fully understood 
its paramount importance and its bearing upon the destinies of New 



280 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

England and of the whole country. As its claims, however, are made 
known, much interest is manifested. 

Those who have had their attention called to the subject and have 
given it some thought and study have become convinced that a state of 
things has come to pass in Massachusetts and New England which calls 
for earnest thought, careful and yet courageous, energetic, and firm 
action on the part of American Christian patriots Avho look somewhat 
into the future. By reason of a state of things now existing in the 
Province of Quebec, and which we French Protestants deeply deplore, 
some 300,000 of our countrymen have been driven from Canada into 
New England. These multitudes, still controlled by their clergy, are 
made to believe that the customs, manners, traditions, methods of 
education, and religious beliefs which for three centuries have prevailed 
in Quebec and made the province what it is, are very good and all 
sufficient, and they are putting forth herculean efforts to graft them on 
your Puritan soil, with the determined purpose of perpetuating them 
here through the French tongue, and in time convert New England into 
a new France. While Americans who have not given the question a 
moment's serious thought laugh at such pretensions, the French Catholics 
are working with might and main and have the following forces in their 
favor: 

1. A steady and ever-increasing immigration from Canada. 

2. A fabulous increase every year by birth, the Canadian race being 
the most prolific of the world. 

3. A constant diminution in the number of American homes in New 
England and a paucity of children in these homes. 

4. The emigration of a large number of American youth to the West 
and other parts. 

5. And finally, a nation unaware of the presence of these disintegrating 
forces or indifferent to them, and thus satisfied to leave the problem 
alone in the indefinite hope that it will solve itself. 

Now we French Protestants, while claiming no special illumination, 
humbly say that our circumstances have compelled us to study the ques- 
tion carefully, and both for the sake of our countrymen and of this 
nation deem it a duty to assert and reassert our earnest and unselfish con- 
victions. We reject the epithet, "bigoted and narrow-minded " men, 
when we beg leave to dissent from the views held and everywhere advo- 
cated by our countrymen of the Komish faith, and on this free, Protes- 
tant soil do not think it necessary to apologize for giving expression to 
our convictions. We ask no one to accept them but simply examine 
them. 

We believe in judging systems of education and religion by the fruits 
they bear. The fruits in the case of the French Canadian race, as a 
whole, are not satisfactory; indeed, are such that it becomes the duty of 
every patriotic Canadian, unbiased by national and religious prejudices, 



isss. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 281 

to seek to bring about a different and better state of things for his 
countrymen here. .Moreover, it would not be for the good of New Eng- 
land nor of the country at large thai the plans of the French clergy 
should succeed. We cannot have on American soil a dozen different 
nations, with their modes of government, their peculiar institutions, 
their tongue, and especially it' allegiance to the President comes second 
to allegiance to a monarch across the sea. We believe in one great 
American people loyal to American institutions, pledged to sustain the 
public school system; and the reason why the French Catholic clergy dis- 
agree with us and call us traitors to our nationality is, that the genius of 
their politico-religious system and that of American institutions are 
mutually destructive. We claim the right by legitimate means, to cause 
if we can our views to prevail, and already 35,000 of our countrymen in 
America have accepted them, rejoice in them and thank God. 

It seems to us, that the American people, first on Missionary grounds 
and then from patriotic motives, should hasten to place at the disposal of 
the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, funds to be used for this 
special work as may be thought best, so that it may not suffer as in the 
past. 

It is encouraging to state that during the last five years much progress 
has been made. Five French churches have been organized in Lowell, 
Springfield, Ilolyoke, Fall River, and Ware, and mission work is being 
done in Spencer, where a church will soon be organized, in New Bedford, 
and in Marlboro. Several other fields are ripe for the harvest, but there 
are no qualified workers, })ossessing a knowledge of both French and 
English, to occupy them. 

We have long been of opinion that missionary work among a people that 
has been under the blighting influences of Romanism for generations, 
must be conducted on pretty much the same lines as in heathen lands. 
Side by side with the mission church there must stand the Christian 
educational institution where the Bible shall be systematically taught. 

In the present condition of our French Protestant churches we cannot 
depend very much on the influences of the home for enlightening Christ- 
ian sentiment and education. Parents cannot teach what they themselves 
have not. been taught. 

We say to those who have means, who love souls, who love the heritage 
of the Puritans, give us a large Christian school, capable of offering for 
eight months of the year a Christian home to some three hundred French 
Canadian youths; a school which we will develop into a Franco -American 
college, where both languages will be taught, where young French 
Canadians will be taught the principles of Christ's religion and those on 
which this nation is built, and where those who have gifts and piety will 
be prepared to carry the Gospel of salvation in French and English to 
their countrymen, not in the New England States only but in the great 
West where thousands of French are scattered. The time is coming 



282 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

when these bi-lingual preachers will be of inestimable value to our home 
missionary work all over the country and become a source of economy to 
our societies. It seems to me that this method of doing missionary 
work must commend itself to the judgment of our enlightened business 
men. 

We now have the experience of three years in this Christian educational 
work. The large number of applications which have come to us from 
Canadian youths proves conclusively that there is a demand for such an 
institution as the French Protestant College. Has not the time come 
for churches and individuals to aid us ? We stand alone. The Massa- 
chusetts Society cannot take of its funds to help us. The College and 
Education Society cannot make us a grant until we are far enough 
advanced to have a class of Freshmen. Our students cannot pay very 
much, being for the most part self-dependent, being rejected by their 
families for the very reason that they are seeking a Protestant Christian 
education. 

If asked what our position is to-day, Ave answer: 

1st. We have 11,000 as the beginning of a permanent endowment 
fund. 

2d. A very tine and desirable building site has been donated to us in 
the City of Springfield, Mass. On this site stands a building which will 
answer our purposes again this year. 

3d. Pledges to the amount of $11,000 have been given toward a col- 
lege building which is to cost $15,000. $6,000 of that amount is paid. 
The plans are ready and it is hoped that the building operations will be 
begun this fall. The trustees are very anxious to secure at once the 
14,000 balance needed. 

4th. The fund out of which the salary of teachers and general 
expenses are drawn is empty. In humble dependence upon God we begin 
the work of the year trusting in him for the $4,000 we will require to put 
us through the year. 

We ask churches to place the French Protestant College on their list 
of benevolent objects. We ask Sunday-schools to give us $75 scholar- 
ships to aid worthy young men, and especially we ask benevolent men 
and women to endow the institution that it may do, without- delay, the 
great work assigned to it by God. 

Contributions may be sent to Rev. E. B. Palmer, treasurer of the 
Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, 9 Cong'l House, Boston, Mass. 



A VOICE FROM THE WILDERNESS. 

Tampa, Colorado, July 15th, 1888. 
"Hope deferred maketh the heart sick." I need not try to express 
the disappointment I feel in the matter of a Home Missionary for this 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 283 

Count)'. May went by, also June; 'tis now midsummer, and the drought 
cf the past two months is a feeble comparison to the soul famine of the 
people. My work, — school and ranch — takes all my strength, or 1 would 
have written to you sooner. 

Dear brother, I am about discouraged. We are here enduring all the 
hardships of a pioneer life. We are building up a new country. To 
keep our day schools going is in some places up-hill work. Sunday- 
schools have been started in six different localities, but I think that 
every one has been suspended. The lew earnest Christian workers seem 
disheartened. We need the preaching of the Word. There is a demand 
for it; people having shown interest enough to listen to the merest 
drivel for a while in the name of preaching. 

Now it is all stopped, and unless it be an occasional sermon at Steam- 
boat Springs, 45 miles from here, by a sojourning preacher, there is no 
proclaiming of the "Word in all this territory 7500 miles in extent. 

Please let me hear from you. Could no one be found to come to us ? 
How much I wish one could come, if only for this fall! 

I feel like leaving this wilderness altogether, and the lack of Sunday 
privileges is the chief cause of my discontent. We seem to be — the 
Christians among us — like a company of soldiers without an officer. We 
need a leader. If you can do anything for us sen£ some one to help us. 
Children are growing up, grown people are getting old, one after 
another leaves to stand at the Judgment-seat; and all the time the arch- 
enemy of souls gets in his work. But T must close. 

My letter may appear disconnected. I care not for that, if only it 
may be the means of bringing a messenger of the Cross to a land that 
the Lord seems to have forsaken. Truly yours, John T. Whyte. 



Rev. Francis Laavson, Durant, Iowa, tells us that the German 
children of his parish, for thoroughness of drill, and energy, take the 
lead of all others. Their Easter Concert "caused visitors from abroad to 
open their eves. Such readiness, fullness, and accuracy of Bible knowl- 
edge is not often surpassed." 



OUR MAGAZINE. 



It is not our custom to take the valuable space of this periodical 
to report the words of encouragement which come to us from those who 
love the cause which we represent, yet in the hope that some other State 
Superintendent and Editor may be reminded to go and do likewise, we 
print the following from The Kansas Telephone. In passing we may be 
permitted to say that this same " Telephone" through its electric center, 
the editorial den. maintains an uninterrupted connection with every Con- 
gregational church in the State, and by a word of encouragement, or 



284 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

inspiration, or sharp rebuke, as the case may require, keeps the mission- 
ary wheels in pretty lively motion. We read, in this always welcome 
paper,. the following: 

"If anybody thinks the place of a Superintendent of Home Missions 
an easy one, let him read our item concerning the number of places visited 
by Superintendent Broad during the past month, and estimate how 
many nights of travel that indicates." 

And yet this same Superintendent although, like all members of the 
fraternity which he represents, — perpetually on the wing, — has managed 
to find time to prepare and publish in The Telephone the following 
urgent appeal to the Kansas churches. May it be a word used by God to 
arouse the people to action at this critical crisis in the affairs of our 
country ! 

The Home Missionary Magazine. 

This time-honored and most valuable publication is not taken by our 
church members as generally as it should be. Indeed, it is to be feared 
that but few in Kansas have it, and get the great blessing which comes 
from its careful perusal. What is most needed to-day, in order to awaken 
the liveliest interest in Home Missions, is a .thorough knowledge of the 
work of the American Home Missionary Society, its needs and its magnif- 
icent opportunities; and just this knowledge The Home Missionary sup- 
plies. This magazine is a rich treasure of missionary information, put 
in a readable and enjoyable form. 

The numbers now passing are of peculiar interest, containing, aslrhey 
do, the annual reports of the superintendents, reports and addresses of 
the Saratoga meeting — including a full report of the "Woman's Depart- 
ment — beside information from the fields. 

May I not, then, urge every family in our congregations interested in 
Home Missions, to try and save sixty cents a year, and send it to New 
York for The Heme Missionary? In no single way, brethren, I believe, 
can you help the home missionary cause so well for the same moderate 
outlay; for this will bring a collection of rich, fresh facts about Home 
Missions, every month, right to your mind, heart, and home, and awaken 
profound interest in the cause. 

And, brethren of the ministry, have we done all that we might to 
press the great value of this magazine upon our people ? Have you 
advocated it from the pulpit ? Should you not, will you not ? Can 
anything be more appropriate, or any single act of yours do better service 
for the Home Missionary cause than this ? On a Sabbath, soon after 
reading this article, will you not take a copy of the magazine into the 
pulpit and explain its contents, and try to induce your people to sub- 
scribe for it ? Or better, after your address on the subject, appoint a 
young friend as canvasser through your fields to take subscriptions. Tell 
the people how eagerly the pamphlet is read by the donors to the society 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 285 

in the East, whose beneficiaries we are. Mention, too, that it has heen 
enlarged and improved of late, having forty-four pages of reading mat- 
ter, all obtained for sixty cents a year, postage prepaid, the address and 
money to bo sent to Rev. Alex. II. Clapp, D.D., Treasurer A. II. M. 8., 
Bible House, Astor Place, New York. And having done all this, kindly 
notify the Superintendent of Home Missions of your action and its suc- 
cess. He is willing to warrant that Kansas will raise her apportionment 
for Home Missions far easier this year if The Home Missionary is widely 
circulated and read. 



TO ALL GOOD CITIZENS. 

At a special meeting of delegates from the churches of Hampden Con- 
ference, held in the First Church last Monday, a committee was appointed 
to take into consideration the purpose of securing a more earnest and sub- 
stantial co-operation on the part of the churches in home missionary 
work. All who give even the slightest study to this subject see the need 
of an advance. Only a glance at the situation is necessary to convince 
every intelligent Christian and every thoughtful citizen that the present 
is a critical time. Every day thousands are crowding to our shores from 
all parts of the world, except China. Every year in the South the blacks 
increase faster than they can be educated and Christianized. Only a 
fraction of this increase is touched by education and a pure Christianity. 
To meet and overcome the adverse influences threatening our institutions 
from this growing ignorance, this flood of unassimilated foreign popula- 
tion, is the urgent need of this day. 

This need should appeal to, should press strongly, not alone upon 
every Christian, but as well upon every citizen and lover of his country, 
although he have no interest in personal religion. The appeal should be 
to the love of country as well as to the love of Christ. Also, the extra 
effort which it was in the mind of those who called this conference to 
promote, should not be a spurt. It should not end with an effort to raise 
something extra just for this year or next. "What is demanded is an 
advance extending over a term of years, say anywhere from ten to twenty- 
five. This advance should not alone reach those who are already giving 
liberally. There should be new givers coming into line in all our 
churches. Not Christians alone should give. Every prosperous man 
should give. Every man who is saving money for his family should give. 
He should realize that it is a part of his duty to his family, as well as to 
his (rod, to stem the tide of ignorance and heathenism menacing our 
institutions. 

The appeal is to the prosperous business men of this region and of the 
country to give a little study to the situation, to consider the needs of 
educational and missionary work in the Christian church. Read Dr. 



286 THE HOME MISSIONARY* October, 

Strong's "Our Country." Then, at points where you are so minded, 
discount it fifty per cent. Still there is enough to show you the pressing 
urgency. Decide that you will give in an effective way. Go to your 
pastor or the church committee, no matter of what denomination, — if you 
haven't any church, select the one of your preference, — and say, " Count 
on me to help in the work of promoting the educational and evangelizing 
interests of the Christian churches. I will begin with $10 or $20, and 
increase it $10 or $20 a year till the sum reaches $50 or $100, and keep it 
up for ten or twenty years." Such a move as this, bringing in numbers 
of new givers, would amount to something, would do immense, incalcu- 
lable good, would go a long way toward redeeming us from all the threat- 
ening dangers. The appeal is to patriotism, to every feeling that moves 
one to love home, family, and country, and to toil and labor for these 
interests. — Rev. M. S. Dudley, in the Spring-field RejJublican. 



A LETTER. 

Brethren and Sisters in the Church of Christ: — May I 
address a few words to you through The Home Missionary ? "In twelve 
of our States and Territories there are to-day more than 1000 communi- 
ties of from 100 to 700 people each, entirely destitute of religious services 
by any denomination." — " To supply the 1000 communities, . . . . 
would require during the coming year, not less than $500 for each com- 
munity, or $500,000 in addition to what we are now doing for Home 
Missions." 

Why not, then, make our battle-cry for the coming year: "One 
million for home missions!" Jesus said, and says to us to-day, "Pray 
ye, therefore, the Lord of the harvest that he will send forth more laborers 
into the harvest." The Lord sends the laborers forth through his 
church. The Holy Spirit said, " Separate me Barnabas and Saul for 
the work whereunto I have called them." God calls the men, but we 
must furnish the means to send them. Money is left to the church, 
through legacies. Money is collected for missionary work by a process 
of pumping, through sociables, festivals, fairs, sewing circles and what 
not. How much better to do away with such red tape and machinery, 
and give, give, give self-denyingly straight into the treasury of the Lord! 
Let all who teach in the home, in the Sunday-school, in the church, 
and out of it, teach the. blessedness of giving, and giving through self- 
denial. 

In this country of plenty our young people have little idea of self- 
denial. Try it, young friends, and see what joy it brings. Take a few 
examples of saving money for the Lord's work. You are very fond of 
sailing, and a party is formed for a day's sail. You expect to " chip in " 
to the amount of one dollar. Instead, take a run in the woods with some 



1888. Till-: HOME MISSIONARY* 287 

IVicml. and save that dollar for the Lord. You think lawn tennis avery 
fine game, and you plan with a friend to have a .set of your own. Your 
share comes t<> three dollars. Save your time and money, and get exer- 
cise in some cheaper way. Four dollars saved I Of course all do not spend 
thus freely for amusements, yet, even in those purchases which we con- 
sider necessary, we spend more freely than we need. A little careful 
thought in the purchase of groceries, or clothing, or a hat, or a pair of 
shoes, may turn many an extra dollar into the Lord's treasury. Earnest 
thought and careful planning will suggest many ways in which we may 
deny ourselves, ami bring in richer offerings to the Lord. 

1 have already begun this plan in a systematic way, and it gives real 
pleasure to think more of the Lord's treasury, and less of my own. Try 
it, beloved in the Lord, and see if He will not open the windows of heaven 
upon you. — K. J. P. 



"HAIL AND FAREWELL." 

With deep emotion I put pen to my last report. Your missionary no 
longer. Your grateful friend forever! Not that I am so near heaven, 
but next best, my church is from this blessed day, entirely self-supporting. 
I came to Nebraska in March, 1880, at the age of forty-eight, a farmer of 
limited means and broken health. 1 was a Presbyterian elder, converted 
in my childhood, and disciplined by severe affliction. Hoping to do 
some good, I sought, not for a good farm, but for a place destitute of 
religious opportunities, a moral desert. I had not long to seek. I went 
to work in Sunday-school and prayer-meeting, while improving "my 
claim." God gave me such a yearning for that desolate neighborhood 
that I could not rest night or day. The long agony of prayer I shall 
never forget. And God heard. People of many denominations met to 
form a church. To my grief they made it Congregational. I do not 
now see what else they could have done. Myself and family put in our 
letters. This was at Freewater. 

Moline was soon organized. I was a pastor on a wide field, including 
these churches and several out-stations, before I was aware of it or even 
had thought of such a thing. The churches and the association recog- 
nized the fact, and your Society, — the mother of us all, — came to the 
rescue. This continued three years. The churches grew, built good 
houses of worship, and I fell flat, health utterly inadequate to the hard 
work of an unbounded field on the prairie. I went into the pulpit but 
once — on dedication day. They sang "All hail the power of Jesus' name," 
and I could only say, " With desire have I desired to eat this passover with 
you before I suffer," and I turned away with the richest joy and the 
deepest anguish I have ever known. My cup was full. The committee 
sent me here to Cambridge, a pleasant village, that my work might be a 
little easier. There was one Congregationalist here, an "old bach," 



288 i^HE HOME Ml >s>7 NARY. October, 

holding clown a claim, four miles south of the town, and he was away for 
a winter vacation. There was not much here but a chance to work and 
a sick man to do it. But we have grown. Have now a fine building, 
worth $3,000, and fifty-eight members. Our first quarrel is, I trust 
farther in the future than my decease. Our town has never had a 
drinking place. My health has improved somewhat, but I am still feeble 
and very happy. I give this history, leaving out much that I would like 
to write, hoping that our brethren on many of the wide and destitute 
fields, suffering so terribly for laborers, may look up among themselves 
some old farmer, teacher, or business man, fairly educated and thoroughly 
consecrated, and make him a leader to victory for the Lord. He can 
work with poor instruments. Dear American Home Missionary Society, 
hail and farewell! — Rev. Amos N. Dean, Cambridge, Nebraska. 



SELF-SACRIFICE. 



There is no other denomination near us, and no church building in 
the county outside of our own at Ree Heights. We have possession of a 
large tract of country, but no place of worship centrally located so as to 
unify the people. The result is, I have to preach at two different school- 
houses, one in the south and the other in the north part of township. 
This gives us a divided work, hence two Sunday-schools and congrega- 
tions, and preaching at each place on alternate Sabbaths. Last Sabbath 
I was at the north school-house. There were at least fifty persons 
crowded into it, — people hungry for for the Word of Life. Most of 
them are poor. The comparative failure of crops the last two years has 
placed many in straitened circumstances. Some had to hire money to 
get grain for seed last spring. The prospect is now, however, for an 
excellent crop, and a few good crops will speedily lift the financial bur- 
dens incidental to a new country. What we want to do — and it must be 
done soon or our opportunity will be gone — is to hold this section of 
country for Christ; hence the immediate necessity for prompt action. 
The people are ready to do what they can, and we have in sight at least 
$200. I want to put up a small church. It will cost $700. If I 
can get enough to buy material, will proceed at once to build. Shall 
erect and inclose the church this fall, and if we cannot secure funds 
enough to finish, will complete when we can. If we can do this, it will 
be a question of only a few years when we shall have a strong and aggres- 
sive church, in which many souls will rejoice in a new-found Savior, 
and it will be the potent factor in the social, intellectual, and moral 
elevation of the people. 

We have many truly devoted and heroic souls. A poor woman whose 
husband was badly frozen last winter and was not able to work until late 
in the spring, who takes in washing for a living, pays five dollars this 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 289 

year for the support of the Gospel. Another poor women said to me, 
"We have no money, but can't you come and board with us two or three 
weeks, for we do want to help the good work along, and feel so bad 
because we have no money to give." The children wanted to make an 
offering to the Home Missionary Society. They had no money, and 
their parents told them they could have the eggs laid on a certain day. 
They gathered up their missionary eggs and sold them, and the offering 
■amounted to live dollars. On Children's Day we had a fine service and 
secured a collection of five dollars, a part of which the children raised by 
picking greens and selling them. I mention these facts to show the 
spirit of devotion and self-sacrifice and enthusiasm, manifested in our 
frontier work. My family are on a farm caring for themselves, and I have 
preached here six months for less than $100. However, we believe in God, 
the country, and the people, and know that there is a glorious future for 
the church in Dakota, and that your contributions will multiply a hun- 
dred-fold in this land of marvelous growth and more marvelous possibili- 
ties. 

Having spent a good part of my life in Woburn, Mass., I know some- 
thing of the loud knocks at the church doors in the East for help; but I 
am sure if you could look over our beautiful prairie, see the poor, but 
cultured and intelligent people who have come hither to find a home and 
plant the standard of the Cross and pre-empt this land for Christ, you 
would feel it to be a grand investment, and a glorious opportunity to help 
a struggling people. — Rev. J. 67. Campbell, Ree Heights, Dak. 



Mock Services.— "Drug Store "— " Land Office "— "©igar Fac- 
tory," are the new names for the saloon in a Western town. The young 
men hold mock open-air religious services, singing parodies on Gospel 
Hymns, praying aloud, and even preaching. "May the Lord have 
mercy upon them!" cries the Missionary, "for they are somebody's 
sons, and perhaps the children of many prayers." 



fflS CUP IS FULL. 



Our readers are requested not to send us any contributions to buy a 
"horse and buggy for a missionary in Nebraska, a notice of whose case was 
published in our last. Why not? Because we've got the money; we've 
got it all, and all in one check. Here is a note which tells the story. 

"Dear Editor,— I cut this from your last week's paper. It moves 
me to send you the enclosed check, with the distinct understanding that 
I'm not known in the matter. If some one else is ahead of me, why, 
return the check, and oblige — Yours truly, ." 

Our good missionary brother, who has had to face the blizzards on the 
open prairies for twenty years, will feel that his cup is full. He only 



290 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

asked 1125, with which he said he could buy a horse aud buggy out in 
Nebraska, and twelve or fifteen dollars more would supply him with a 
harness; but his unknown friend sends him 8150, adding in his note, 
"The extra ten dollars will improve the harness, or tuck in a blanket for 
good of man and beast." 

To the above we return the following answer: 

"My very dear Sir,— I feel like lifting up my hands, and blessing 
you in the name of the Lord. If he is blessed who gives a cup of cold 
water to a disciple, how much more he who gives a horse and buggy! 
May the Lord reward you a thousand fold! I have already sent the 
check to this hard- worked missionary, who will offer up his prayers to God 
for you in his home on the western plains. — Yours gratefully, ." 

If anybody else would receive the same thanks and prayers for doing 
a good act, he has but to show the same kindness and generosity to one 
of God's suffering ministers. — Exchange. 



Big Horn, Wyoming. — The people here are very poor. This is 
owing to the fact that there is no market here for farm products. The 
farms are very productive, but nearly all last year's crops are still in store. 
Large stacks of hay are rotting on the field, which, if we had an outlet, 
we could ship to all parts of the Territory. Do you wonder that we watch 
and long for a railroad? 

But if we are poor outwardly, we are rich just now in spiritual things. 
God's presence is with us. Our Sunday-school is the banner school of 
the Territory, and the spiritual life of the church is deepening. Five 
requests were presented last Sabbath for church membership. Many hearts 
are softening, and ere long we trust will yield to Christ. , The Sunday- 
school is under the excellent management of a godly lady. — Rev. S. J. 
Jennings. 



Helena, Montana. — We are suffering from a deluge of unex- 
pected obstacles which are incident to a western field, chief of which has 
been a sudden but permanent exodus among our people. One double 
family divided up, part going to New Mexico, and the other half to 
England — and this one double family filled three pews every Sabbath, 
night and morning. Other large families belonging to us have been 
transferred to other fields, leaving our infant enterprise somewhat 
crippled. Several of our young people have gone to the States for an 
education. At one time the heart of your missionary was well-nigh 
dismayed lest the very foundations be removed. But the Lord is holding 
us, and our congregations still hold their own in number, or nearly so. 
One encouraging element of my work has been my Bible class, which 
numbers about twelve regular members with also twelve more hangers on 
who come occasionally. But it is an inspiriting sight to see them filling 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 391 

from one to four pews, diligently attending Sabbath after Sabbath to my 
humble but well-meant services. The city has had a wonderful financial 
prosperity this year, and noble residences on our side have been erected, 
but alas! how few of their owners have any interest in spiritual matters. 
Our little church moves steadily on, and in our recent application you 
notice we have ventured to ask nearly $200 less this coining year, making 
nearly $800 less aid from you than we received two years ago! Indeed, I 
don't see where all this money comes from, but it shows what can be done 
by ''steadfast continuance." But oh, how we need a parsonage! I have 
to pay $420 a year for bare walls, and am constantly threatened with a 
rise! Coal, — well, that costs us $25 per ton; and wood at last amounts to 
nearly thesame price. But our church is faced Zionward till the Prom- 
ised Land is reached. Your missionary never enjoyed ministerial labor 
more in his life, and our young men in the seminaries arc badly blinded 
to their own as well as the Master's interest, when, loth to come West, 
the\ take eastern parishes. Here is the day of opportunity, and grand 
work, and results. — Rev. F. D. Kelsey, Helena, Montana. 



PLAIN WORDS. 



People are queer about missionaries. They will go without food to 
minister to their necessities, but if a missionary speaks or writes longingly 
of some luxury, even though it be what we call a necessity, we think they 
must lack in spirituality. Now, out here in the West, I know a 
missionary who never spoke one word of complaint about his hardships. 
He never wrote, even in an official report, about being compelled to sleep 
on the floor for eight successive months. He never complained when 
compelled to ride ninety miles in a wagon over rough mountain roads to 
conduct a funeral service in mid-winter. He never told you how he had 
to sleep and study in a bed-room eight by twelve feet in size. There were 
no shutters on the windows, and the mercury went as high as 114°. 
The sun beat in there eight hours a day. Outside of this room — his home 
— there was no shade. As far as the eye .could reach, there was nothing to 
see but a scorched, treeless plain. He used to ride sixty miles through 
wind and dust to preach. Sometimes he had to sleep in a coal-shed. 
Blankets thrown on shavings composed his bed. His regular preaching 
place was in a school-house. Lanterns placed upon the seats gave the 
required light for evening service. But he who had left a comfortable 
home and church to come here for Christ's sake, uttered no word of 
complaint. 

Yet, when this faithful missionary went to another field, — where 
hundreds spent the Sabbath outside the sanctuary to ten who listened to 
his words, — and asked for a Magic Lantern, — what a breeze it created 
in the "Ladies' Aid Society" to whom the letter was written! It did 



292 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October^ 

seem an unnecessary luxury to those good women, but to him it would 
have been a heaven-sent blessing, for through its ministry with its 
picture-plates of the "Life of Christ'' and "Temperance" he hoped to 
draw in the perishing multitudes to hear the sacred story, and also to 
furnish a counter-attraction to the saloon. 

Well, I have said my say, but of one thing you may always be sure. 
When a missionary asks for anything which you think he might get along; 
without, he doesn't ask it for his own personal convenience, but to help 
along the blessed cause. — A Constant Reader. 



Wlonx'i\n f s gcjntvtmcut. 



No grace is more necessary to the Christian worker than fidelity, — the 
humble grace that marches on in sunshine and in storm, when no banners 
are waving and there is no music to cheer the weary feet. 



The president of the Vermont Woman's Union voices the prayer o£ 
many another leader in the vast work before us, when she exclaims, "Oh, 
for a stronger head to plan, and an additional number of hands to execute 
what is in my heart to do in this great work ! The needs of this Home 
Missionary field are so vast, that one's sight is staggered, and only as we 
take it up with implicit faith in the Great Leader, can we have courage 
to attempt it." 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

On the 9th of May last, a daughter was born to the American Home 
Missionary Society, whom we named "The Woman's Home Missionary 
Union of Southern California." This was a great day for us, who 
have labored on this coast more than twelve years with no organized 
effort of this kind for the advancement of Christ's kingdom at home. 
We think we have the very best of ladies for officers. The society has 
commenced its life with the motto fi Freely ye have received, freely give."" 
It has seven tributary societies, and money in its treasury. We hope 
during the year to report good, if not great, work. — Mrs. James F. Ford T 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



NEW YORK. 

CONSTITUTION OP THE NEW YORK WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION. 

Art. 1. This Society shall be called the Woman's Home Missionary 
Union of the State of New York. Its objects shall be to promote 
missionary and evangelistic work in all parts of our land, by forming* 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 293 

auxiliaries in the churches of the State, and through them collecting 
money for the various societies of the Congregational order. 

Art. II. Its officers shall be a President, Vice-President, Secretary, 
Treasurer, and an Executive Committee, consisting of one from each 
Association of the State. The President, Vice-Pesident, Secretary, and 
Treasurer shall be ex-officio members of said Committee, and seven of the 
Committee so constituted shall be a quorum for the transaction of busi- 
ness. 

Art. III. — Sec. 1. The President shall have general oversight of the 
interests of the Society, and preside at its annual meetings. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall perform the duties of the President 
in her absence. 

Sec. 3. The Secretary shall make and preserve the records of the 
Society, and give any information desired respecting the formation of 
auxiliaries and the work of the Society. 

Sec. 4. The Treasurer shall take charge of all the moneys of the 
Society, forwarding them as directed by the auxiliaries to the Treasurer 
of the designated Society, and Jhe moneys not so specified shall be 
appropriated according to the judgment of the Executive Committee. 

Sec. 5. The Executive Committee shall be in communication with 
the churches in their respective associations or conferences, aid in the 
formation of auxiliaries, and arrange if possible for a yearly meeting 
within the bounds of each local association, at snch time and place as 
may be expedient; and shall have power to fill any office that may become 
vacant during the year. 

Art. IV. Any local society may become auxiliary by contributing 
annually five dollars or more through the Treasurer of the Union, and 
its members will be entitled to vote at the meetings of the Union. 

Art. V. The annual meeting of this Society shall be held in 
connection with the annual meeting of the General Association of Xew 
York. 

Art. VI. This Constitution maybe amended at any annual meeting 
of the Union by a two-thirds vote of the members present, notice of the 
proposed change having been given one year previous. 



EPAPHRODITUS boxes. 

St. Paul mentions having received of Epaphroditus the things which 
were sent him from Philippi. 

But observe, it was not money, it was certain things that were sent, 
and those of us who know how packages are made up can understand the 
interest with which, on their arrival, the elaborate cordings would be 
unloosed, and the successive wrappings removed, until at last "the things" 
would be displayed. What these warmly welcomed things actually were, 



294 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

wo are not tol£, but if St. Paul, theu in bonds, recognized many little 
contributions from Euodias and Syntyclie, you may be sure it brought 
tears to his eyes, as I myself have seen to happen when a missionary box 
from home has been opened at the ends of the earth. 

Ah! you dear good friends at home, you little know the priceless value 
of such tokens of remembrance your missionary boxes convey to those 
who are much alone, and nourish their faith and hope in the absence of 
surrounding aids and influence. A very dear and very practical English 
friend, after reading these words, commenced at once making up a box of 
"things," pins, needles, tapes, hair-pins, scissors, thimbles, black sew- 
ing-silk, and the many trifling articles which missionaries could use or 
sell for the benefit of the schools. This energetic worker soon had an 
" Epaphroditus Box " on its way, and shall not others follow such a good 
example? — JRev. Dr. Syle, England. 

[The American Epaphroditus box finds a permanent place in the 
chamber of the lady of the house. While on her usual shopping expedi- 
tions, she either duplicates her purchases, or selects some useful article for 
the missionary sister on the frontier, who is likely to be miles away from 
a store. "When box No. 1 is filled, it is either sent direct to the front, or 
handed over to the Ladies' Aid Society to help fill the regular missionary 
box, while box No. 2 takes it place at home.] 



Extract from a Letter. — "While resting by the sea for a few weeks, 
I have been greatly impressed with the largeness of that prophecy in 
Isaiah: V The earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord, as 
the waters cover the sea." We who are praying and Avorking for the 
up-building of God's kingdom, see in this jn-omise what we are working 
toward. When the tide is at its ebb, I see the promise yet unfulfilled. 
When the flow comes in, wave after wave filling in and "covering" the 
entire bed of the sea, I catch a glimpse of that glorious time when " all 
shall know Him from the least unto the greatest " — audit seems easy to 
pray ei thy kingdom come. " How inexpressibly sweet are such anticipa- 
tions! How my heart glows with desire and longing to have everybody 
know our dear Father in Heaven! It is so precious to be admitted to the 
love and intimacy of God, and to work along the lines of his glorious 
plans for the salvation of the world. — 0. L. G. 



OUR SOCIETY. 

We started about a year ago in a quiet way, admitting as members 
those who would pledge themselves to do and give something, and ask 
others to do and givj something for Home Missions. We were Baptists, 
and Congregationalists, mostly, with a sprinkling of other denominations. 
We gave mite boxes to all who would take them — ladies, girls, young men 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 295 

and boys, distributing at the same time the story of "Mrs. Pickett's Mite 
Box." Over a hundred were given out, and every one seemed charmed 
with the leaflet. The idea of contributing to the mite boxes for blessings 
received, at first predominated over other motives, especially among the 
young people. If any member chanced to say "I am glad," another 
would immediately respond, " Remember youT mite box!" 

It was true of this, as of most communities, that the people had 
never studied very deeply into the missionary cause, but our members 
began to read missionary intelligence. Leaflets were freely circulated, 
and the people found that as soon as they began to read about the cause, 
they became interested, and wanted to give for it. 

One lady decided at the time of the blizzard that she would put some- 
thing into her mite box every time any one called at the house during 
the rest of the year. You may be sure 'hat when this was known, we 
made special efforts to keep her from being lonely! 

After awhile some of the members said they could no longer afford to 
give in the line of blessings; because, even if they could, one box would 
be wholly insufficient, for they could "load down several !" 

When the boxes were opened we found eighty dollars for Home 
Missions. The remarks and confessions concerning these little boxes 
were of deep interest to some of us. One lady said, "I did not bring my 
box — there was so little in it. The truth is, it stood beside the bank of 
my little daughter, and it was very hard to go by that to the mite box." 
After listening to Mrs. Eastman's paper, k> Have Salt in Yourselves, " she 
handed a contribution to our treasurer. 

Another, who had frequent guests to dinner, placed her box on the 
dining-room shelf that it might attract pennies to itself. This proved so 
successful, that feeling the need of a " Webster's Unabridged " in her 
family, she placed another beside it, labeled •'•'New Dictionary." 

Money came from people who had little to spare. The greater part 
of it came from homes where there were children to rear, and the homes 
yet to be paid for. 

The young ladies have a special object for their mite box collections, 
and Ave have not yet opened those of the boys ; but we have come to the 
conclusion from our experience thus far that the mite box is very useful 
as a reminder, and as a convenient receptacle for money that can be spared 
at the time, without serious inconvenience, and that would not otherwise 
be saved for the cause. They have worked better with us than member- 
ship fees, or pledges, for the system is without form or formalities. We 
go to the place appointed (some one's house) any time in the afternocn, 
read, or listen to reading, and earnestly discuss the needs of our land and 
the work being done to meet these needs. Some of us occupy ourselves 
with needlework. We stay as Ioag as possible, and go home to tea. We 
think once in two weeks not too often to meet in this way. 

While thinking of the many blessings which make me glad, I am 



290 THE HOME MISSIONARY. 'October.. 

grateful for two pictures in my mind which I brought from Saratoga last 
June, and which I would not exchange for many hundreds of dollars. 
One is that of Mrs. Eastman, in her perfect young womanhood as she 
stood before that grand audience, aud urged our daughters to bring all 
their treasures and lay them at the feet of Christ, and render their lives 
to him in joyful service; and the other that of dear Mrs. Goodell, sweet 
and saintly, as she gave us those words of inspiration. I can see her face 
now, and hear her voice as she exclaims, " It seems almost too good to 
believe, that we may actually hasten the coming of His kingdom by our 
prayers! That we may open the very treasuries of heaven upon our mis- 
sionary workers, and bring down tbe power of the Holy Spirit on their 
work. But it is true." 



TIMELY BLINDS. 



I have been reading about the meeting at Saratoga. What a good 
time you did have ! It is really an inspiration to read about it. My let- 
ter, which you kindly published iti The Home. Missionary, has sent us 
money enough to cover the windows of the Esmond church with blinds. 
They were put on just in time to save the windows from destruction by 
that last fearful hail storm. Many of our people lost their entire crops 
during that storm. Where stood great fields of waving grain ready 
to harvest — nothing is left but bare straws ! Tbe corn fields were 
stripped and the gardens ruined. How these people are to be warmed 
and clothed and fed this winter in their poor houses is a mystery. We 
rode thirty miles yesterday calling on these afflicted ones; and trying to 
comfort them. They seem benumbed by the calamity that has over- 
taken them. Their homes are mortgaged. They have no money, and were 
placing their dependence upon these crops. We called upon one family 
living in a sod house, where there were nine children. 

On Monday next, we go to Mitchell to consult with Superintendent 
AViard, and see if any plan can be devised by which the new fields can be 
reached where there are no gospel privileges, and where churches ought 
to be organized, at once. But, alas ! there are no men — there is no- 
money ! It is heart-sickening to see these new towns springing up all 
along the railroads, which we ought to occupy and cannot, for W3 are just 
working ourselves to death now. 

There is a little society at South Amherst, Mass., called "The Little 
Old Folks Band," which has helped us considerably in our work. We 
think the name a " cute " one. 

Pray that our strength may hold out until more laborers are sent intc> 
this great field. — Mrs. A. J. Drake, Iroquois, Dak. 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY, 297 



CHRISTIAN ECONOMY. 

I was pleased to read " A Word to the Thoughtful," in The Home 
Missionary for August. If only some hulyof wealth and influence would 
take the lead in wearing plain, inexpensive clothing, and use the cost of 
elegant dress for the Master's work, how many would gladly follow, each 
one practicing her own measure of economy, for many who do not wear 
elegant costumes would find ways of economizing. Could not such a 
" society " or " band " be formed of those who might call themselves 
" Home Missionary Helpers," or "Economists," or something denoting 
the same? An inexpensive little pin might be made, using the monogram 
if. M. 11. or II. M. E. as a sort of badge. Perhaps it might be a help. I 
do not know — it is only a suggestion. Uow MUCH might flow into the 
treasury from the hands of consecrated women ! 

[Every neglected missionary field in our country might be supplied 
with a church building, parsonage, and missionary, at once, if the cost of 
superfluities in the wardrobe of every American Christian woman 
were to be added to the Lord's treasury.] 



(Duv !!omi0 people. 



PRUE'S MISSIONARY MONEY. 

" Oh, mamma, my potatoes are looking splendid, and papa thinks 
there will be at least six bushels; and if they are fifty cents a bushel, 
there will be three dollars. Only think ! won't that be a good deal of 
money?" So saying, Phil Sanborn drew up to the dinner table 
delighted. 

"Yes, my son, that will he a good deal, indeed," said Mrs. Sanborn, 
as she smiled down upon her ten-year-old boy. 

The spring previous some of the ladies interested in missions had been 
in that town to tell of the grand work they were doing, and even the 
boys and girls were interested. Phil had been told that he might plant 
some potatoes, earing for them himself, and have their price for missions 
when these ladies came again. 

Prue, Phil's nine-year-old sister, heard, and her large blue eyes grew 
sad, for she had nothing to give. 

"Eat your dinner, Prue," said mamma; "I thought my little girl 
was fond of apple dumplings." 

"So I am but — I was thinking." 



298 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

"Of what, pussy ?" asked papa. "Any new disease attacked your 
dolly?" 

"No, pupa; but such, wonderful things are to be done." 

" What wonderful things ? Is Barnum coming up here with his 
museum ?" 

"Why, no, papa; but about missions; and you and mamma and 
auntie, and even Phil, have something to give, and I — I haven't any- 
thing." And Prue ended with a sob. 

" Who ever expected girls could earn anything, I'd like to know? 
See here Prue, I'll give you ten cents of my potato money," said Phil. 

"Thank you, I do not want it," returned Prue. 

"I'll give you twenty-five cents," said papa. 

"That would not lie earning it myself, as the rest of you do ! No, I 
shall give nothing which is not my very own," said the little miss. 

After the dishes were washed, mamma sat down to her sewing, and 
auntie to her knitting, while Prue, with the kitten in her lap, was in a 
brown study. 

"Oh, mamma, I've got an idea!" and Prue gave such a jump that 
the kitten went out of the window. "Auntie said I was very clever at 
making dolls' clothes, and I might make a few suits, real nice ones, and 
put them in Mr. Robe/ts' store. He will let me, if it is for missions, 
and then I'll have some money all my own to give." 

"So you shall, dearie," said auntie. "Get your silks and merino, 
and your dolly, and we will commence. I will cut and fit, and you shall 
sew every stitch." 

In November the missionary meetings were held again. Phil gave 
three dollars and seventy-nine cents — the dollars from potatoes, and 
the cents from chestnuts. Then happy little Prue brought her offering — 
four bright, new, silver dollars, with her eyes shining like stars. 

That night, as they talked the meeting over by the fire at home, Phil 
said, "I have changed my mind about girls, since Prue earned so 
much. I don't know that many boys could have done better." 

And Prue whispered to mamma, " Wasn't it work for Jesus, too, 
mamma ?" 

"Yes, darling, if you did it for the love of helping Him," replied 
mamma, with a loving kiss for her little girl. 

"It seemed to-clay as though Jesus stood there and smiled at me, say- 
ing, ' Prue, I know you love me, for you gave up those pretty clothes for 
me.'" 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY, 299 



HOW TO BE HAPPY. 

Arc you almost disgusted 

With life, Mttle man 2 

I will tell you a wonderful trick 

That will bring you contentment 
If anything can — 

Do something - for somebody, quick; 

Do something for somebody, quick ! 

Are you awfully tired 

With play, little girl ? 

Weary, discouraged, and sick V 

I'll tell you the loveliest 

Game in the world — 

Do something for somebody, quick ; 

Do something for somebody, quick! 



QUESTIONS. 

55. Define the word "auxiliary." 

56. What is a State Auxiliary ? 

57. How many State Auxiliaries has this Society ? 

58. Name the States. 

59. Where do you find these names ? 

60. What must a State do to become an auxiliary of The American 
Home Missionary Society? 

61. What is the American Home Missionary Society trying to do ? 

62. How? 

63. How many Missionaries does this Society send out ? 

64. Does this Society have any schools ? 

65. How many, and in what States ? 

66. Is there a State or Territory in this country where this Society 
has no missionary ? 

67. Are the ladies doing anything to help this Society? 

68. How many State organizations have these ladies, and in what 
States ? 

69. What is the name of the ladies' Fund ? 

70. What is the name of the children's Fund ? 

71. What fund will the young ] adies raise this year ? 

72. How many Congregational 2hurches are there in this whole 
country ? 

73. How many of these were started by the American Home Mission- 
ary Society ? 

74. How much money did the churches give this Society last year ? 

75. How much does the Society want this year ? 



300 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 



"OLD SPEC." 

I want to tell you of what " we girls " have just been doing to raise 
some money. But first I must tell you that our minister's salary is very, 
very small, — quite insufficient for him to keep a horse, but it did seem 
absolutely necessary for him to have one, so our Auntie, bless her dear 
generous heart! gave him our Old Spec, with the buggy, harness, and all 
the "fixings." His real name is Speculation. Then we thought the 
rest of the people ought to give the food for Spec to eat. One of the 
neighbors said, " Come to my house, and have any kind of an entertain- 
ment you like, and invite the whole town." So we did, and about one 
hundred came. I can't tell you all that was said and done, but our 
programme began by four little boys prancing about the room on broom 
handles, singing "Ride a broom horse to Banbury Cross." Then a little 
boy recited, 

" I had a little pony whose name was Speculation. 
I lent him to a lady to ride him to the station." 

Then some very little girls sang, "Jog Spec, Jog Along." Then a 
poem written for the occasion was read, which I have copied for you : 

speckle's plea. 
I've a story now to tell you. If you'll kindly lend an ear, 
I'll try my best to please you, and make my meaning clear. 
My home was in the country at the dear Hillside, 
Where hearts and doors and purses are always opened wide. 
The sick, the poor, the humble, and the low 
Are sure of a welcome, if there they go. 
My mistress was ever indulgent and kind, 
But was sure all my weak points and failings to find. 
She believed it a duty, if any one could, 
To go out in the world, and try to do good. 
She could not see me idle, and very soon she found 
How I might be made a blessing to your whole town. 
So I was now re-fitted in quite a royal style, 
And properly equipped for many and many a mile. 
I thought it all over, but it was very hard to part ; 
For my old home yet has a hold upon my heart. 
I had young friends at Hillside, that for many a day 
I had trotted around, either for work or for play. 
I loved the dear girls, they were true friends I found, 
But they said " Good-bye, Spec, now don't tumble down !" 
So one spring morning, with the mud to my knees — 
The thought of it now about makes me sneeze — 
I was trotted out slowly, and I wondered, Where next ? 
But I very soon found 'twas the Parsonage Annex. 
My mistress provided nice straw for a bed, 
So I've a comfortable place for my weary old head. 
But I can't live on straw and hay, like the goats, 



188.S. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 301 

So please, generous friends, will you give me some oats ? 

'Twill lengthen the purse-strings of your pastor and wife, 

Who are giving you now the best of their life 

In prayer and in thought, sweet and tender with love, 

Guided always, we know, by our Father above. 

I know I am old, and dumb as the wall, 

But the things I do know, would astonish you all. 

We go out " to call " when the weather is fine, 

And attend to everything that comes in that line. 

We make it a point wherever we go 

To call on the friend, not forgetting the foe. 

We call on the sick, the feeble, and worn ; 

And leave in each heart a glad, sweet song, 

Or a few scattered seeds for the sweet bye-and-bye 

Which shall reach their fruition in the home on high. 

Now just let me whisper, for I greatly fear renown, 

I do think I'm a blessing to your whole town. 

So open wide your purses, and loving thought take 

For others, kind friends, for old Speckle's sake. 

After this appeal a collection was taken for benefit of Spec, and then 
we all adjourned to the carriage-house where we found this notice : 

"HORSE FAIR. ADMISSION FIVE CENTS." 

There, to be sure, was Speculation himself, to give us welcome. Then 
we were introduced to a Clothes Horse, a Saw Horse, a Shaving Horse, a 
Horse Pistol, Horse Radish and Horse Chestnuts. Behind a screen was a 
"Bridal Scene" which consisted of two bridles hanging side by side. 
The Horse Rake and some Spectators completed the exhibition. There 
was an exhibitor to describe the different horses. He said, for instance, 
that ' the Clothes Horse often had six legs. It was a horse much used 
by ladies, was considered perfectly safe, never kicked, but sometimes fell 
down,' etc. 

I read in The Home Missionary that it would be a good plan for 
some of us young people to try and help about these Missionary horses 
that are now so much needed, and I wondered if somebody couldn't take 
a hint from our pleasant little entertainment, and get up something 
similar. We were perfectly satisfied with the amount of money we col- 
lected. — From one of your Young Friends. 



THE BLANKET INDIANS. 

One of our young friends is spending a few months in Indian Terri- 
tory, and sends us a pleasant letter, in which she says, " I am stopping 

at an army post sixty-five miles north of H , Texas. We had to come 

that distance in a rickety old stage, but when you get here, it is just 
lovely. The larks are singing, the red-birds are whistling, and the 



302 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

flowers are blossoming all about us. We are on the Kiowa and Comanche 
Keservation, among the Blanket Indians. But although they wear 
blankets, they don't let that stand in the way of having good wagons, 
and the scouts have baby carriages! We often see the shining canopy- 
tops bobbing around, in and out among the bushes, and sometimes flying 
past the house with the baby's e} T es bulging out of its poor little head. 
I do feel a great deal of sympathy for these Indians, but everything is 
dreadfully crooked in regard to them. How hard it is to undo a wrong! 
We have taken everything away from them, and the way we give it 
back makes them paupers. They get their beef at issue, and li ,r e high 
until it is gone, and then they beg and starve until next issue day. 

" I have tried to straighten things out in my mind, but I can't do it. 
I always bow, and say ' How?' when I meet them, and look pleasant. They 
know very little English, but they say ' Good ' if anything pleases them. 

"One of the scouts came by to-night while we sat upon the porch. 
The band was playing for dress-parade, and he stopped and listened to the 
music. He looked up at us, aud smiling very pleasantly said ' Pretty 
good.' I'm afraid you will not think that this is much of a home 
missionary letter, but there is need enough of home missionary work all 
about here, I can tell you." — Ella. 



^mvcicmx (HoXXcqc mx& gttucatiati ^xrjcttt^. 

Rev. John A. Hamilton, D. D., Secretary. 

Rev. Theodore Y. Gardner, Western Secretary. 

James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer. 
10 Congregational House, Boston. 

[Money for the Society may be sent to James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer, No. 10 
Congregational House, Boston; or to Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D. D., 34 Bible 
House, New York.] 

WHITMAN COLLEGE. 

FROM THE FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS OF THE 
AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

The sixth year of Whitman College, Walla Walla, W. T., has been 
fraught with discouragements as well as encouragements. 

A number of cases of typhoid fever existed in the city, and a fear of 
taking the disease doubtless prevented the usual increase of attendance at 
the beginning of the winter term; yet, notwithstanding this and perhaps 
other impediments, the total number of different students for the year is 
190, and the total amount received for tuition exceeds that of a year ago 
by more than $700. 

The work of teaching has been excellent, and has been appreciated by 



1888. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 303 

students and patrons. Most of our students have a purpose in their work, 
and such of them as go East to take post-graduate studies or professional 
training take high rank among their classmates. 

But the greatest improvement of all, and the greatest encouragement, 
is the marked change in Whitman College in favor of Christianity, 
Nearly all of the college students are professing Christians, and the 
number in the academic department is increasing. During the year 
there has been no general revival in the city or college, but there has been 
a quiet, steady Christian work, both in the city churches and in the insti- 
tution. In our Congregational Church it is especially so. Every now 
and then a student or young person of the city has come to Christ and 
then joined a church. This is owing to the fact that we constantly hold 
up the Bible as the word of God and the true guide of life; that we teach 
such works as Hopkins' Evidences of Christianity and Gregory's 
Christian Ethics; that students and teachers are unostentatiously active; 
and that churches and Endeavor Societies work with plan and method 
and zeal. Whitman College, you may rest assured, and our community 
also, are both becoming more Christian, and especially is it true that the 
powerful infidel sentiment among our students a few years ago is now 
taking a back seat in the College. 

But Whitman College needs encouragement. I believe it deserves 
encouragement. It needs the prayers of those who give it funds; it needs 
the prayers of those who kuow its wants but cannot give it funds; it 
needs $2,500 a year to keep it moving steadily along in the path it is now 
taking, until it has a larger endowment. Over $500 has been raised in 
the home field during the year, and just as soon as there is a change for 
the better in an unprecedented condition of business affairs which has 
arisen out of a monopoly in the transportation of the products of our 
valley to market, larger amounts will be forthcoming. The principal of 
our debt is not allowed to increase, and has recently been re-funded at a 
low rate of interest. In no event will the East be asked to pay the debt. 
It will be paid by the people of Walla Walla, according to the original 
understanding. For the present, we depend upon the East for funds to 
help pay current expenses, needed buildings, and endowment. Shall we 
trust in vain? I think not, for Whitman College always has been and is 
now the object of prayer, and God hears prayer. 



304 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



^ppoiuimeuts itx jyugxxsi, 1888. 



Not in commission last year. 

Brown, Miss Nettie, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 

Crane, Edward P. , Welsh, La. 

Davenport, Isaac W., Newark, N. J. 

Ewart, John Y., Manchester, N. J. 

Franklin, August W., Youngstown, Ohio. 

Harris, Joseph C. C, Pico Heights, C'al. 

Hungerford, F. H., Green River and Rock Springs, 

Wyo. 
Isakson, Carl A., Buffalo, Minn. 
Koch Johannes, Ritzville and Eudicott, Wash. 

Ter. 
Martin, John'L., West Dora, Minn. 
Moore, Gaines P., Coral, Mich. 
Nutting, John D., Newport, Ky. 
Oviatt, T. M., Antioch, Cal. 
Peters William J., Bountiful, Centerville and 

Farmington-, Utah. 
Powell, Richard, Coal Dale, Penn. 
Rawson, George A., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Seaberg August, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Slater, C. C, WestDuluth, Minn. 
Staats, Henry T., Monk Hill, Cal. 
Stevens, William, Wakefield and Fink, Mich. 
Thompson, John K., New Rockford, No. Dak. 
Webster, George J., Ashland, Or. 
Wells, Andrew J., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Wells, John A., Oakwood, Mich. 
W T illis, J. Vincent, Plankinton, So. Dak. 

He-commissioned. 

Allen, Abram B., Hannibal, Mo. 

Baker, Benjamin F., White City, Kan. 

Bartlett, Dana W.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Bascom, George S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Boedeker, Miss Ellen M., Vinita, Ind. Ter. 

Bonnell, William H., Pocatello, Idaho. 

Bonnett, Louis M., Athol and Iowa Union, Kan. 

Brodhead, William H., Denver, Colo. 

Bruechert, F. H. W., Omaha, Neb. 

Daniels, Henry M., Oceanside and Carlsbad, Cal. 

Davies, John F., Lima, Ohio. 

Davis, Albert A., Fosston, Minn. 

De Long, Thomas W., Ainsworth, Neb. 

Dungan, George, Otis and Hyde, Colo. 

Eaton, Cyrus H., Strang and Shickley, Neb. 

Egerton, Thomas R., Jamestown, Ind. : and East 

Gilead, Mich. 
Emery, Miss Alice, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 
Fisher, Samuel V. S., Minneapolis, Minn. 



Foster, Richard B., Cheney, Jewett and Rago, 

Kan. 
Fowler, William C, Livingston, Mon. 
Oilman, William L., Harmon, Colo. 
Graf, John F., Springfield, Mo. 
Griffen, Miss Sally E., Vinita, Ind. Ter. 
Hall, Russell T., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Haskell, Robert B., Guttenberg, N. J. 
Haven, Egbert D., Sunol Glen, Cal. 
Henshaw, George, Sharon, Penn. 
Hoffman, Elisha A., Belden,Ohio. 
Holton, Mrs. E. M.. Vinita, Ind. Ter. 
Hubbard, William B., Chamberlain, So. Dak. 
Jones, Abraham, Blossburg, Penn. 
Jones, Miss Emma, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 
Jones, Harvey, Compton, Cal. 
King, John W., Eaton, Colo. 
Knopf, Frank E., Angola, Ind. 
McCarthy, John, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 
Macomber, Hiram J., SteeleCity, Neb. 
Markham, Henry F., Cora and out-stations, Kan. 
Marsh, Henry, Edmore, Mich. 
Marsh, Thomas, Wallace and Russell Springs, 

Kan. 
Morse, Robert C, Westmoreland, Kan. 
Morris, George, Crockett, Cal. 
Newberry, Charles E., Steilacoom, Wash. Ter. 
Oakey, James, Pierre, So. Dak. 
Palm, Emanuel J., Christian Lake, Minn. 
Parsons, Henry W., Lake Benton, Minn. 
Peebles, David, Sandy and West Jordan, Utah. 
Pike, Alpheus J., Dwight and Grafton, No. Dak. 
Piatt, Luther H., Wakarusa, Kan. 
Piatt, Merritt F., Spring Valley, Cal. 
Ruddock, Charles A., Benson and Campbell, 

Minn. 
Salazar, J. Pablo, San Rafael, New Mex. 
Scroggs, Miss Ella W., Rogers, Ark. 
Scioggs, Joseph W., Rogers, Ark. 
Thomas, Ozra A., John^s River and Wynooche, 

Wash. Ter. 
Thomson, R. J., Baltimore, Md. 
Thurston, Thomas W., Hope, No. Dak. 
Todd, John W., Barnesville, Minn. 
Travers, Robert M., Ravenna, Neb. 
Vivian, Richard, Freeport, Mich. 
Webb, Miss Mary G., Rogers,- Ark. 
Wiggins, Aaron W., New Cambria, Mo. 
Wolcott, William Henry, South Riverside, Cal. 
Wright, Malan H., Port Sanilac and Carsonville, 

Mich. 
Zercher, Henry J., Julesburg, Colo. 



itoxipts itx &\XQ\xst, 1888. 



MAINE-S104.86. | Kittery Point, by Rev. O. Holmes 

Farmington New Old South Ch., by '"fty'K^ eS^ **** 

lASTfe by" RevVow: W »" * We6t MiDOt < Mrs ' T ' V ' D ' *^- 

Hi&T, Mr 8 : simon p ag e;:::::::;: 11 <$> I NOT L n eSJS w ^ of whi <* 



$18 00 

21 50 
9 40 



1888. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



305 



Received by L. D. Stevens, 
Treas. N. II. Miss. Soc, 
Concord: 

First $8 00 

A Friend 10 00 

A Friend 5 00 

Gilsuni- 15 00 

Great Falls 32 00 

Henniker 92 10 

Mount Vernon, J. A. Stow- 

ell 5 00 

New Ipswicn 1 10 

Pelham 50 00 

Penacook, Mrs. A. W. Fisk, 5 00 

West Concord 15 00 

fi>238 "^ 

: Exeter, A Friend 86 00 

Hanover, Legacy of Mrs. Eliza M. 
Young, by Prof. C. F. Emerson; Ex. 100 00 
Ch. Dartmouth College, by J. V. 

Hazen 14 00 

Kingston, M is. A. Wood 5 00 

Lisbon, First, by Mary R. Cummings, 9 02 

Lyme, bv Rev. E. P. Butler 34 00 

Milford, Legacy of Lydia II. Frost, by 

A. and D. Heald, Ex 500 00 

North Hampton, J. L. l'hilbrook 10 00 

Warner, Woman's Miss. Soc. of Cong. 
Ch., by Miss R. B. Thompson 6 00 

VERMONT— $164.20. 

Barton, by Dr. R. B. Skinner 16 17 

Browuington, M. S. Storrs 5 00 

Chelsea, First, by Mrs. W. P. Town- 
send 8 48 

North Pownal, A. Friend 50 00 

Pittsford, A Friend _ 20 00 

Waterbury, by C. M. Sheldon 12 61 

Westminster, Mission Band, by Alice 

S. Dascomb... 10 00 

Windsor, by H. B. Thompson 42 00 

MASSACHUSETTS— $3,682.61; of which 
Legacies, $850.00. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas 2,000 00 

By request of Donors 542 00 

Amherst, Legacy of Mrs. Achsah 

Smith, $500; and Miss Mary Clark, 

$200, by E. W. Clark 700 00 

Auburndale, Mrs. S. G. Mosman 2 10 

Hyde Park, A Friend, of which $20 

special 40 00 

Leverett, First, by S. K. Field 28 51 

Medway, A Friend 100 00 

Millbury, C. E. Hunt 10 00 

Monterey, Anonymous 10 00 

North Abington, Rev. C. Jones 1 00 

North Brookfield, Mrs. H. M. N., of 

First Ch 10 00 

Provincetown, Cong. Ch. Miss. Soc, 

by Rev. I. R. Prior 11 00 

Quincy, J. H. Wheble 1 00 

Springfield, Mrs. J. Harmon 2 00 

Vt inchester, Legacy of Harriet N. 

Jackson, by A. C. Tenney,Ex 150 00 

Worcester, by E. Sawyer, special 25 00 

Mrs. Mary E. Gough 50 00 

RHODE ISLAND— $17.00. 

Newport, A Friend 15 00 

Woonsocket, A Friend 2 00 



CONNECTICUT— $2,064.67 

Legacy, $200.00. 



of which 



Miss. Soc. or Conn., W. W. Jacobs, 
Treas., by Rev. W. H. Moore, Sec, 

Received by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, 
Sec. Women's H. M. Union: 
Fairfield, Ladies of the First Ch. , for 
Salary Fund 



259 20 



18 00 



Centerbrook and Ivoryton, H. M. S.. 
by Mrs. L. D. Webber, for Salary 

Fund $50 00 

Cheshire, Y. P. S. C. E., by W. II. Al- 
ias, for Mo. Pelt Fund 2 50 

Chester, A Friend, by Rev. A. Hall... 10 00 

Connecticut, A Friend 102 50 

Connecticut, for New Work 500 00 

Cornwall, First, by S. C. Beers 28 65 

Darien,\V. M. Nash. 100 

Durham, by li. G. Newton 4 00 

Enfield, D. II. Abbe, by II. W. Hub- 
bard.. 5 00 

Fairfield, Abby 1$. Nichols, special... 5 00 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Lecte to 
const. Miss Harriet C. Leete a L. M. 50 00 

Hadlyme, by R. E. Hungerford 5 70 

Ivoryton, Mrs. J. E. Northrop, for 

Salary Fund 30 00 

Madison, Mrs. A. D. Lee, to const. C. 

T. LeeaL. M. 50 00 

Middletown, S. 11. Clarke, special 25 00 

New Haven, Humphrey Street Ch. and 
S. S., by H. E Bartlett, to const. 
Rev. F. R. Luckey, Miss M. L. Post, 
Miss M. Bullis, N. P. Smith, W. R. 
Chambers and E. G. Trowbridge L. 

Ms... 300 00 

Norfolk, by J. N. Cowles 27 62 

Northford, by E. Smith 30 00 

Norwich, from the estate of Miss Abby 
Coit Williams, dec, by G. D. Coit, 

Adm 200 00 

Norwich Town, F. S. Avery 15 00 

Old Lyme, First Ch., by R. Griswold. 75 00 

Roxbury, Cong. , S. S., special, by E. 
G. Seeley, through Rev. W. H. 

Moore, Sec. Miss. Soc. Conn 10 00 

Somers, by L. W. Percival 20 71 

Somersville, by E. C. Chapman 17 01 

South Windsor, First Ch., by C. J. 

Rockwell 13 90 

H. W. Sadd, special 10 00 

Stonington, add'l, by Rev. C. J. Hill. 10 00 

Torringford, by C. H. Barber 20 88 

Washington, by C. L. Hickox 118 00 

West Hartford, "Friends," special... 20 00 
Whitneyville, S. 8., by C. B. Gilbert, 

for Salary Fund 25 00 

Woodbury, Anonymous 5 00 

NEW YORK— $641.63 ; of which Leg- 
acy, $180.00. 

Received by Rev. A. G. Upton : 

Jamestown $16 25 

Batavia, on account of Trust Estate 
of Judge P. L. Tracy, by J. F. Tracy, 

Trustee 180 00 

Bay Shore, by Rev. C. W. King 66 00 

Brooklyn, Tompkins Avenue Ch.. 67 00 

Two Friends 8 00 

Cohoes, Mrs. Mary E. Clark 22 00 

East Bloomfield, by F. Munson «27 40 

Fairport, J. E. Howard, to const. Mrs. 

Clara Dudley a L. M..._ 50 00 

Gasport, Carrie S. Wilcox 4 34 

Hoosick Falls, A Friend 5 00 

Lewis and Wadham's Mills, by Rev. 

A. R. Crawford 30 50 

Maine,-Ch., $28; Cong., S. S., $3.36, by 

Rev. C. H. Kilmer 31 36 

Mt.*Vernon, Mrs. M. C. Kellogg, spe- 
cial 14 00 

New York, A Friend 12 00 

Orient, bv M. B.Brown 15 17 

Oswego Falls, bv Rev. C. Olmstead... 2 50 

Parkville, by Rev. E. Beecher 10 00 

Perry Center, A Friend 10 00 

Schr'oon Lake, by J. H. Pitkin.. 10 00 

Syracuse, Plymouth Ch., by H. C. 

Hemingwav _ 51 63 

Union Center, bv Rev. C. H. Kilmer. 3 48 

Upper Jay, B. Wells and Daughter... 5 00 



30G 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



October. 



NEW JERSEY-$40.00. 

Chester, A Friend $40 00 

FLORIDA— $59.90. 

Received by Mrs. L. R. Part- 
ridge, Treas. Woman's H. 
M. Union: 

Jacksonville $10 75 

Tampa.. 17 00 

27 75 

Glencoe, S. S.,$2.50; C. R. Howard, 
^2 50 5 00 

Nashua,' S.~ S.~, by A.'H." Crane! ....... 6 15 

Tavares, by Rev. A. T. Clarke 21 00 

TEXAS— $6.30. 

Cleburne, Trinity Ch., by C. W. Mertz 6 30 

INDIAN TERRITORY— $7.75. 

McAllister, by Rev. W. H. Hicks.... 5 00 

Vinita, by Rev. N. M. Wheat..: 2 75 

ARIZONA— $75.00. 

Prescott, by Rev. H. W. Houlding 75 00 

TENNESSEE— $4.00. 

Soddy. by Rev. L. Morgan 4 00 

OHIO— $181.74. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser: 

Atwater, by H. E. Brush.... $28 89 

Chardon 5 00 

Chester, by W. Johnston... 4 35 
Steubenviile, by Rev. C. W. 

Carroll 6 50 



Received in July by S. P. Churchill, 
Treas. Bohemian Board, Cleveland: 

Received by Mrs. Phebe. A. Crafts, 
Treas. O. W. H. M. U.: 

Harmar, W. M. S $25 00 

Hudson 1 00 

WestEnd, N. J 2 00 

Received by Mrs. Phebe A. Crafts, 
Treas. Ohio Woman's H. M. Union: 
Cleveland, Euclid Avenue 

Ch., L. H. M. S $20 00 

Hudson, L. H. M. S 7 00 

Oberlin, Second Ch., L. Soc. 10 00 

Centre Belpre, Cong. S. S., by Maud 
E. Tiffany 

Chagrin Falls, First, by J. J. Davis.. 

Cuyahoga Falls, Cong. S.